Return to Proposal Finder FY 1999 Proposal 9010

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Assess Fish Habitat & Salmonids in Walla Walla Watershed in Washington
BPA Project Proposal Number 9010
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Business acronym (if appropriate) WDFW
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Glen Mendel
Mailing Address 401 S Cottonwood St.
City, State, Zip Dayton, WA 99328
Phone 5093821005
Fax 5093822427
E-mail snakeriv@dfw.wa.gov
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 1999
Province Lower Mid-Columbia
Subbasin Walla Walla
 
Short Description To determine fish passage, rearing and spawning conditions for steelhead and potential reintroduction of salmon, and to assess steelhead & bull trout distribution, densities, genetic composition in Walla Walla watershed.
Target Species Mid-Columbia River Natural Steelhead, Wild Bull Trout


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses:
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses:
Other Planning Document References


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

n/a or no information


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed a. Establish 4-5 constant recording stream discharge monitors in the lower Walla Walla River, Touchet River and possibly lower Mill Creek to identify available water for salmonid passage and rearing during April or May through October.
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed b. Conduct periodic stream discharge measurements to calibrate constant recording discharge monitors and at other sites to provide information on water discharge available for salmonid passage and rearing.
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed c. Conduct periodic flights of the lower Walla Walla and Touchet rivers to determine continuity of stream flows for adequate fish passage and rearing.
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed d. Deploy constant recording water temperature monitors at various sites in the Walla Walla, Touchet, Mill Creek, and tributaries to determine temperature limitations for salmonid passage, rearing or spawning (April-October).
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed e. Establish fixed water quality monitors and periodically collect water quality data (eg. dissolved oxygen, turbidity, pH, total phosphorus, etc.) to determine suitability and limitations for salmonids (April-October).
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed f. Conduct habitat survey in portions of stream with potential for salmonid use to quantify habitat conditions & limiting factors.
1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla Watershed g. Conduct an Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) Study of the lower mainstem Walla Walla River to determine recommended flows needed for fish passage and rearing. Begin planning for an IFIM study for the Touchet River in 2000.
2. Determine salmonid distribution, habitat use and relative abundance in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla watershed. a. Conduct steelhead and bull trout spawning surveys. Conduct extensive surveys and then establish index areas throughout the basin.
2. Determine salmonid distribution, habitat use and relative abundance in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla watershed. b. Conduct electrofishing or snorkel surveys during summer to determine salmonid rearing distribution. In index areas determine fish density, abundance, and habitat use.
3. Identify, and genetically characterize stocks of naturally produced steelhead and bull trout in the Walla Walla Watershed. a. At existing adult steelhead trap sites in Oregon & Washington collect up to 100 fin clips from each adult natural steelhead & bull trout for DNA analysis. Supplement with steelhead tissue samples from for electrophoretic analysis for comparitive analysis
3. Identify, and genetically characterize stocks of naturally produced steelhead and bull trout in the Walla Walla Watershed. b. Collect fin clips/tissue from juvenile steelhead/rainbow/bull trout during electrofishing for salmonid distribution, density, abundance surveys for genetic analyses to supplement adult collection, if necessary.
3. Identify, and genetically characterize stocks of naturally produced steelhead and bull trout in the Walla Walla Watershed. c. Conduct DNA or electrophoretic analyses at the WDFW genetics laboratory and compare with other genetic analyses for nearby populations to identify steelhead and bull trout stocks.
3. Identify, and genetically characterize stocks of naturally produced steelhead and bull trout in the Walla Walla Watershed. d. Use the genetic stock identification information to plan for development of local steelhead broodstocks for hatchery production in the Walla Walla Watershed.
4. Compile and disseminate results and conclusions for watershed restoration planning. a. Annually distribute written data summaries and complete a final written report for distribution
4. Compile and disseminate results and conclusions for watershed restoration planning. b. Report results orally to various organizations

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 04/01/99 12/01/01 55.0%
2 04/01/99 12/01/01 20.0%
3 04/01/99 12/01/01 15.0%
4 04/01/99 08/01/02 10.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 1999 Cost
Personnel $ 71,166
Fringe $ 20,282
Supplies $ 54,325
Travel $ 7,640
Indirect $ 26,859
Subcontractor $ 3,520
Total Itemized Budget $183,792


Total estimated budget

Total FY 1999 project cost $183,792
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 1999 budget request $183,792
FY 1999 forecast from 1998 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2000 2001 2002
All Phases $179,234 $159,000 $ 25,000
Total Outyear Budgets $179,234 $159,000 $ 25,000
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: ESA listings of bull trout and/or steelhead may delay scheduled activities until ESA permits are obtained, or listings may require modifications to proposed actions to reduce potential impacts to listed species. High flows in area streams may require delay of monitoring devices until flows subside in May or June.


Section 6. References

n/a or no information


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract

Fish habitat in streams within the Walla Walla watershed of southeast Washington and northeast Oregon has been severely degraded by urban and domestic development, farming, grazing, irrigation, logging, recreational activities, floods and flood control efforts. Historically, the Walla Walla basin produced substantial runs of both spring chinook and summer steelhead. Chum and coho also were likely present. Salmon have been absent from the basin since approximately the 1920's due to irrigation dams, extensive water withdrawals and habitat degradation (CTUIR 1989). Native steelhead runs have also declined. Steelhead and bull trout in the Walla Walla watershed are candidate species, or proposed for listing, respectively, under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1995) calls for regular updating of subbasin plans (7.0C) and collection of population status, life history and other data on wild and naturally spawning populations (7.1C and 7.1C.3), which includes bull trout (10.5A). It also calls for improved hatchery production, or developing new hatchery supplementation programs, while proceeding with extreme caution to avoid damaging remaining wild and naturally spawning populations (7.2). The Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) recommends developing, implementing and evaluating supplementation plans and risk assessments (7.3, 7.3B.1, 7.4A). It also requires writing a hatchery production Master Plan (7.4B, 7.4L) that includes identification of factors limiting production and setting project goals and objectives. A watershed assessment and coordination of habitat planning efforts is recommended (7.6C). The FWP also states that instream flow needs should be established and protected (7.8G). The Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 1997) and the NPPC (1997) recommended that watershed assessments precede implementation of restoration projects (III.B.11). The NPPC has funded several projects in the Walla Walla basin (9601100, 9601200, 9604600, 8805302) with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation (CTUIR), and the Walla Walla Conservation District (9606400). Additional aquatic resource efforts are underway in the basin by Corps of Engineers (COE) for resource planning and environmental restoration (COE 1997, COE 1992) and by a citizen watershed council in Oregon (BOR 1997). The Columbia and Walla Walla County Conservation Districts supmitted a proposal to the Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE) for funding a watershed planning effort in 1998. A Subbasin Plan (CTUIR 1989) and a draft hatchery production Master Plan (CTUIR 1993) have also been compiled for the watershed. All these efforts in the Walla Walla watershed are for planning or implementing watershed and fish stock restoration programs. The WDFW is proposing to conduct a watershed habitat and salmonid fish stock assessment in the portion of the Walla Walla Basin within Washington State (>70% of the basin). The project would assess the habitat conditions (particularly stream flows, water temperatures, and water quality) that affect steelhead and bull trout use and passage in the lower portion of the basin, as well as the potential for adult and juvenile passage should spring chinook or other salmon species be reintroduced. Habitat and fish stock assessment in the middle and upper watershed within Washington would evaluate the amount of potential rearing and spawning habitat available, habitat limiting factors for steelhead, bull trout and salmon (if they are reintroduced in the future), and habitat conditions, habitat use, distribution, abundance and genetic stock identification for existing natural populations of steelhead and bull trout. The specific objectives are as follows: 1. Assess habitat conditions for anadromous and resident salmonids in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla watershed. 2. Determine salmonid distribution and relative abundance in the Washington portion of the Walla Walla watershed. 3. Identify, and genetically characterize stocks of naturally produced steelhead and bull trout in the Walla Walla watershed (including part of Oregon). 4. Compile and disseminate results and conclusions for watershed restoration planning. Methods proposed for this study include habitat and fish components. A series of fixed monitoring sites for measurement of stream discharge and spring and summer water temperatures and water quality would be established and operated. Additional measurements will be taken periodically at other locations. Habitat surveys such as Hankin and Reeves (1988) or use of habitat suitability models for spring chinook (Raleigh et al. 1986) and rainbow/steelhead trout (Raleigh et al. 1984) will be conducted at selected sites throughout the basin to determine the number and quality of pools and cover as well as quantify other habitat measures and habitat limiting factors. Data collection for the distribution and abundance of salmonids will include steelhead and bull trout spawning surveys and electrofishing or snorkeling for juvenile fish during the summer. Genetic stock identification for natural steelhead and bull trout will consist of taking samples of tissue or fin clips at existing adult trap sites, from recovered carcasses, or from juveniles during electrofishing surveys. A DNA sequencer, or gel electrophoresis will be used to analyze allelle frequencies and compare with other steelhead and bull trout populations. The information proposed for collection is critical for planning and implementing watershed restoration, resource management for sensitive and depressed salmonid populations, as well as for planning hatchery supplementation or continuing hatchery mitigation for steelhead, or for reintroduction of spring chinook or other salmon in the Walla Walla basin. Some results would be available within one year, and the final project report would be available in 2002. Annual summaries and coordination with CTUIR, ODFW, COE, WDOE and the Walla Walla and Columbia Conservation Districts, as well as others, would receive high priority.


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

This project has not yet been reviewed

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