Return to Proposal Finder FY 1999 Proposal 9100

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Reestablish Safe Access into Tributaries of the Yakima Subbasin
BPA Project Proposal Number 9100
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Business acronym (if appropriate) YIN, WDFW
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Scott Nicolai
Mailing Address P.O. Box 151
City, State, Zip Toppenish, WA 98948
Phone 5098656262 6689
Fax 5098656293
E-mail snicolai@yakama.com
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 1999
Province Lower Mid-Columbia
Subbasin Yakima
 
Short Description Reestablish passage over artificial barriers into ten tributaries, to regain over 100 miles of anadromous habitat. Protect reaccessed habitat through fencing, and property and conservation easement purchase.
Target Species


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses:
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses:
Other Planning Document References


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

n/a or no information


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Reestablish safe juvenile chinook and steelhead passage into eight additional miles of habitat in the lower Wilson/Naneum drainage. a. Seek additional cost-share funding for construction.
1. Reestablish safe juvenile chinook and steelhead passage into eight additional miles of habitat in the lower Wilson/Naneum drainage. b. Subcontract engineering design work with currently approved cost-share funding from the eastern Washington Regional Fisheries Enhancement Group.
1. Reestablish safe juvenile chinook and steelhead passage into eight additional miles of habitat in the lower Wilson/Naneum drainage. c. Construct a total of 5 fishways and 5 irrigation diversion screens.
2. Conduct field surveys to map and describe passage barriers and unscreened diversion in ten tributaries to the Yakima River a. Collect maps, ownership information, formulate data sheets
2. Conduct field surveys to map and describe passage barriers and unscreened diversion in ten tributaries to the Yakima River b. Obtain permission to access private properties.
2. Conduct field surveys to map and describe passage barriers and unscreened diversion in ten tributaries to the Yakima River c. Conduct field surveys. Develop tributary barrier reports on findings.
2. Conduct field surveys to map and describe passage barriers and unscreened diversion in ten tributaries to the Yakima River d. Conduct field surveys.
3. Complete reports on the conclusions from the barrier and diversion surveys. a. Develop draft barrier reports, circulate for peer review.
3. Complete reports on the conclusions from the barrier and diversion surveys. b. Modify draft based upon input form others.
3. Complete reports on the conclusions from the barrier and diversion surveys. c. Circulate final reports to other fish managers and irrigation districts.
4. Secure cost-share funding for construction projects. a. Solicit cost-share funding for engineering and construction from the BOR, the eastern Washington Regional Fisheries Enhancement Group and the USFWS.
5. Formulate an construction plan to remedy passage problems a. Run calculations on cost per unit habitat gained from barrier construction at alternate sites
5. Formulate an construction plan to remedy passage problems b. Collect input from other fish managers on findings of report
5. Formulate an construction plan to remedy passage problems c. Finalize fishway and screen construction plan.
6. Construct fishways at migration barriers and reliable screens at gravity-fed diversions in ten tributaries, to regain more than 100 miles of habitat. a. Secure all applicable permits.
6. Construct fishways at migration barriers and reliable screens at gravity-fed diversions in ten tributaries, to regain more than 100 miles of habitat. b. Draft statements of work, circulate to contractors.
6. Construct fishways at migration barriers and reliable screens at gravity-fed diversions in ten tributaries, to regain more than 100 miles of habitat. c. Receive bids, award contracts.
7. Permanently protect the most productive habitats in treated stream reaches. a. Develop list of candidate sites for purchase and fencing.
7. Permanently protect the most productive habitats in treated stream reaches. b. Contact landowners to solicit involvement.
7. Permanently protect the most productive habitats in treated stream reaches. c. Develop voluntary MOA’s with landowners to initiate easement language, land appraisals, and fencing.
7. Permanently protect the most productive habitats in treated stream reaches. d. Compare purchase options, prioritize based upon cost/benefit analysis.
7. Permanently protect the most productive habitats in treated stream reaches. e. If necessary, conduct Habitat Evaluation Procedures to develop priority list for purchase.
7. Permanently protect the most productive habitats in treated stream reaches. f. Finalize purchases, construct fences.
8. Monitor results of construction. a. Conduct snorkle and/or electrofishing surveys in treated streams.
8. Monitor results of construction. b. Conduct redd surveys in treated streams.
8. Monitor results of construction. c. Include findings of surveys in annual and final reports.
8. Monitor results of construction. d. If necessary, conduct statistical analysis’ on smolt outmigration numbers at the Chandler juvenile facility.
9. Establish trust fund for the O&M of the screens and fishways. a. Place $426,757 into a trust fund account.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 05/01/99 11/01/99 2.0%
2 10/01/98 10/01/99 2.0%
3 10/01/98 12/01/99 1.0%
4 10/01/98 09/01/01 1.0%
5 10/01/98 05/01/99 1.0%
6 04/01/00 09/01/03 79.0%
7 10/01/98 09/01/03 5.0%
8 10/01/98 09/01/03 1.0%
9 10/01/03 10/01/03 8.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 1999 Cost
Personnel $ 62,904
Fringe $ 25,767
Supplies $ 32,600
Capital $ 90,000
Travel $ 3,336
Indirect $ 57,086
Subcontractor $125,108
Total Itemized Budget $396,801


Total estimated budget

Total FY 1999 project cost $396,801
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 1999 budget request $396,801
FY 1999 forecast from 1998 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2000 2001 2002 2003
All Phases $1,583,000 $1,583,000 $1,583,000 $426,757
Total Outyear Budgets $1,583,000 $1,583,000 $1,583,000 $426,757
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: Time constraints include construction season limitations, contractor schedules, permitting delays, and coordinating with irrigators to avoid conflicts with irrigation deliveries. Time constraints include weather limitations. Time constraints include construction season limitations, contractor schedules permitting delays, and coordinating with irrigators to avoid conflicts with irrigation deliveries. Time constraints include land availability, potential limitations of conservation easement recipients, weather limitations on land appraisals, contractor scheduling (for fence construction).


Section 6. References

n/a or no information


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract

Items to be funded include the following In project year #1- 1. Construction of five fishways and five irrigation screens in the lower eight miles of the Wilson Creek watershed; 2. Field surveys of passage barriers and unscreened diversions in 10 Yakima subbasin tributaries that do not experience chronic dewatering problems; 3. Completion of barrier and unscreened diversion reports based on field surveys in #2; 4. Solicitation of additional cost-share funding to construct additional fishways and screens based upon the findings of the barrier report; 5. Formulation of an construction plan to implement findings of the barrier report; and, 6. Tributary habitat protection through fencing of roughly 9 miles of riparian habitat, and/or conservation easements or property purchase of roughly 50 acres of floodplain. In project year #2 - 1. Construction of additional fishways and screens in some or all of the surveyed tributaries; and, 2. Additional tributary habitat protection through fencing of roughly 9 miles of riparian habitat, and/or conservation easements or property purchase of roughly 50 acres of floodplain. Project years #3 and #4 would continue as in project year #2, and would complete the action recommendations of the barrier report produced in year #1. The only activity in project year #5 is placement of funds in a trust fund, for the maintenance and eventual replacement of the fishways and irrigation screens. The goal of the project is to rebuild Yakima River spring chinook and steelhead populations. Project objectives include establishing safe passage into tributary habitats that have artificial barriers at their confluence. The target tributaries do not have chronic instream flow problems, and they historically had several hundred of miles of anadromous habitat. At present, only 11 miles remain. However, these tributaries have tremendous rearing potential in comparison to the mainstem. Many miles of tributary habitat still expresses healthy channel sinuousity, width/depth ratios, and thermally benign winter temperatures due to groundwater inflow. The mainstem Yakima’s hydrograph is regulated, i.e. flows are too high during summer releases, and too low during the winter to provide optimal rearing habitat. The Yakima Species Interaction Studies group has maintained population survey sites below the lowest migration barrier of some of the tributaries targeted through this proposal, and they have found relatively high densities of juvenile salmonids, including spring chinook and steelhead, compared to mainstem locations. Due to the rapid conversion of many streamside properties from commercial farming to suburban development, the project would also allocate $90,000/year to habitat protection through property acquisition, conservation easements and fencing. Thus this project also intends to “protect the best” from permanent loss. The project is relevant to the 1994 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program in that it will contribute to the protection and restoration of anadromous fish stocks in the Yakima Basin. Reconnecting functional habitat is an important component of the fish restoration effort. The project will also protect terrestrial wildlife species through riparian habitat fencing, and purchase of conservation easements and property. The project is based upon the scientific principle that reconnecting more than 100 miles of potentially productive tributary habitat to the mainstem, when only eleven miles can be accessed currently, will contribute to the rebuilding of natural Yakima River salmon and steelhead stocks. This is the overarching goal of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Production Facility. Tributary habitat reconnection in stream that do not currently have chronic instream flow problems is the main objective of this project. The final product will be reconnection of more than 100 miles of tributary habitat to the mainstem by the end of FY2003. The results of fishway construction will be monitored through snorkle and redd surveys in the treated streams. The snorkle survey results will be included in annual and final reports. Screening will be monitored through direct observation.


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

This project has not yet been reviewed

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