Return to Proposal Finder FY 1999 Proposal 9137

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal John Day Watershed Restoration
BPA Project Proposal Number 9137
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon
Business acronym (if appropriate) CTWSRO
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Patty O’Toole
Mailing Address P.O. Box C
City, State, Zip Warm Springs, OR 97761
Phone 5415533233
Fax 5415533359
E-mail potoole@warmsprings.com
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 1999
Province Lower Mid-Columbia
Subbasin John Day
 
Short Description Protection and restoration actions to improve water quality and fish habitat, eliminate passage barriers for anadromous (spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead trout, and Pacific lamprey) and resident fish, and reduce summer water temperatures.
Target Species


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 5.4D.8, 7.8H.2, 7.8G.2, 7.10, 10.2.C, 7.8.2
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses:
Other Planning Document References


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

n/a or no information


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Return Flow Cooling #1 North : Improve water quality and quantity for anadromous and resident fish in the John Day River. a. Install approximately 1760’ of perforated pipe over a 22 acre project area to replace failing wooden drains installed over 70 years ago.
. b. Install a valve station at the drain confluence with the river to allow adjustment of the local water table as necessary.
. c. Install a safety screen over the outlet pipe.
. d. Place approximately 20 cubic yards of 36” minus riprap around the outlet pipe to prevent streambank and bed erosion.
. e. Shape all construction spoils and plant grasses and hardwoods as appropriate to reduce erosion and to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery.
. f. Repair the existing riparian exclusion fence.
2. Indian Creek Diversion: Improve water quality and fish habitat and eliminate passage barriers for anadromous and resident fish in Indian Creek, a tributary to the John Day River. a. Install a permanent concrete and rock diversion structure with positive fish passage facilities at existing ditch head (legal point of diversion).
. b. Construct a concrete turnout box and spillway; install trash screen to protect turnout box; and install headgate in turnout box and water measurement weir as appropriate.
. c. Incorporate layflat stanchions in spillway for insertion of flash boards to regulate water level at headgate.
. e. Place approximately 80 cubic yards of 36” minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the river on grade relative to the point of diversion to ensure flow over the fishway under all normally occurring water conditions
. f. Incorporate the existing hydraulically powered fish wheel to screen fish from the ditch.
. g. Stabilize the east and west banks of the stream as necessary with riprap rock to protect the installation.
. h. Shape existing spoils on the banks and plant grasses and hardwoods to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery in the disturbed areas.
3. Southside Ditch Diversion (Chouinard): Improve water quality and fish habitat and eliminate passage barriers for anadromous and resident fish in the John Day River (approximately 5 miles east of Dayville, OR). a. Install a permanent diversion structure with fish passage facilities at the site of the existing annually installed structure.
. b. Construct a concrete turnout box and spillway; incorporate a trash screen and headgate.
. c. Incorporate layflat stanchions in spillway for insertion of flash boards to regulate water level at headgate.
. d. Place approximately 180 cubic yards of 36" minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the river on grade relative to the point of diversion to ensure flow over the fishway under all normally occurring water conditions.
. e. Install 100 feet of 24 inch PVC pipe immediately downstream of headgate to replace existing high loss open conveyance.
. f. Incorporate the existing hydraulically powered fish wheel to screen fish from the ditch.
. g. Stabilize the east and west banks of the stream as necessary with riprap rock to protect the installation.
. h. Shape existing spoils on the banks and plant grasses and hardwoods to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery in the disturbed areas.
4. Courchesne Diversion: Improve water quality and fish habitat and eliminate passage barriers for anadromous and resident fish in Long Creek, a tributary to the Middle Fork John Day River (approximately 5 miles east of Long Creek, OR). a. Install an infiltration gallery at the site of the existing annually installed structure.
. b. Install a shutoff valve and riser to allow backflushing the system if necessary.
. c. Install 400 feet of PVC conveyance pipe.
. d. Place approximately 36 cubic yards of 24" minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the creek on grade to assure erosion or headcutting will not damage the gallery or bypass the collection system.
. e. Stabilize the east and west banks of the stream as necessary with riprap rock to protect the installation.
. f. Shape existing spoils on the banks and plant grasses and hardwoods to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery in the disturbed areas.
5. Keerins Diversion: Improve water quality and fish habitat and eliminate passage barriers for resident fish in the Upper South Fork John Day River. a. Install a permanent diversion structure with fish passage facilities at the site of the existing annually installed structure.
. b. Construct a concrete turnout box and spillway; install trash screen and headgate.
. c. Incorporate layflat stanchions for installation of flash boards to regulate water level in spillway.
. d. Place approximately 48 cubic yards of 36" minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the river on grade relative to the point of diversion to ensure flow over the fishway under all normally occurring water conditions.
. e. Incorporate water measuring device.
. f. Stabilize the banks of the stream adjacent to the structure as necessary with riprap to protect the installation.
. g. Shape existing spoils on the bank and plant grasses and hardwoods to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery.
6. Panama Canal Diversion: Improve water quality and fish habitat and eliminate passage barriers for anadromous and resident fish in the John Day River. a. Install a permanent diversion structure with fish passage facilities at the site of the existing annually installed structure.
. b. Construct a concrete turnout box and spillway; install trash screen and headgate.
. c. Incorporate layflat stanchions for installation of flash boards to regulate water level in spillway.
. d. Place approximately 200 cubic yards of 36" minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the river on grade relative to the point of diversion to ensure flow over the fishway under all normally occurring water conditions.
. e. Incorporate the existing water measuring device and hydraulically powered fish wheel to screen fish from the ditch.
. f. Stabilize the banks of the stream adjacent to the structure as necessary with riprap to protect the installation.
. g. Shape existing spoils on the bank and plant grasses and hardwoods to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery.
. h. Rebuild existing riparian corridor fence.
7. Lemons Ditch Diversion: Improve water quality and fish habitat and eliminate passage barriers for anadromous and resident fish in the John Day River near Mt. Vernon, OR. a. Install a permanent diversion structure with fish passage facilities at the site of the existing annually installed structure.
. b. Construct a concrete turnout box and spillway; construct trash screen to protect turnout box; and install headgate in turnout box.
. c. Incorporate layflat stanchions for installation of flash boards to regulate water level in spillway.
. d. Place approximately 260 cubic yards of 36" minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the river on grade relative to the point of diversion to ensure flow over the fishway under all normally occurring water conditions.
. d. Place approximately 260 cubic yards of 36" minus riprap in conjunction with sheet steel piling in the bed of the river on grade relative to the point of diversion to ensure flow over the fishway under all normally occurring water conditions.
. e. Incorporate the existing water measuring device and hydraulically powered fish wheel to screen fish from the ditch.
. f. Stabilize the banks of the stream adjacent to the structure as necessary with riprap to protect the installation.
. g. Shape existing spoils on the bank and plant grasses and hardwoods to promote rapid riparian vegetative recovery.
. h. Rebuild existing riparian corridor fence.
8. Upper Basin Cottonwood Reserves Demonstration Project: Demonstrate actions to improve riparian diversity, productivity, provide for long-term instream habitat components, preserve local genetic materials, and enhance water quality in the John Day basin.i a. Identify locations of key cottonwood reserve areas on private and federal lands, in addition to those already identified.
. b. Secure final cooperative agreements with landowners and agencies, on their respective lands, where reserves will be established
. c. Outline perimeters of proposed reserves.
. d. Secure sufficient materials and construct protective barriers around identified reserves.
. e. Collect young plant materials to be "banked" in the Monument Plant Nursery and BLM Clarno Cottonwood Nursery.
9. Seasonal Corridor Fencing Demonstration Project: Demonstrate actions to improve riparian diversity and productivity, provide for long-term instream habitat components, and enhance water quality in the John Day basin. a. Select final list of landowners willing to participate in a demonstration project.
. b. Negotiate and secure final cooperative agreements with landowners.
. c. Locate final position for seasonal corridor fences.
. d. Secure solar panels, electric fence, posts, and other materials sufficient to construct seasonal enclosure.
. e. Construct enclosure prior to grazing turnout.
. f. Monitor vegetative response.
. g. Remove electric wire and solar panel following plant dormancy
10. Beaver Management Program: Continue implementation of program reintroducing beaver where suitable habitat is identified, manage beaver that are in conflict with human activities, and inform the public regarding the benefits of beaver management a. Continue implementation of the intergovernmental agreement. Identify additional participants, if any. Incorporate modification and amendments, if any.
. b. Continue transplant program. Select next five priority watersheds Complete habitat review and suitability analysis, complete communication plan, and incorporate monitoring of additional transplants into monitoring plan. Complete additional relocations.
. c. Continue public education efforts. Continue presentations to local schools, agencies, and organizations. Broaden current local educational effort to encompass regional distribution.
11. Stream Gauge Operations: Collect river flow data downstream of the upper Mainstem restoration projects for use in benefit analysis and evaluation and to assist with planning future actions. a. Amend current contract and memorandum of agreement with Oregon Water Resources Department for water year 1998 to extend through 1999.
. b. Transfer funds to OWRD.
. c. .Receive collected data.
. d. .Analyze data in combination with other monitoring efforts.
12. Watershed Trust Fund: Complete planning for creation of a watershed trust fund for the John Day basin; provide for the long-term implementation of watershed restoration program; provide flexibility in implementation; and assurance of long-term results. a. Update 1996 watershed trust fund proposal developed by a consortium of John Day basin cooperators.
. b. Organize local and regional support for proposal.
. c. Prepare presentations, discussion papers, fact sheets, and other informational/supporting materials.
. d. Develop elements of proposal package including, but not limited to:authorizing legislation, restoration principles and objectives, consolidated projects schedules from water optimization study and implementation plans, funding sources, and fund operation.
. e. Develop and negotiate funding agreements with participating agencies and foundations.
13. Monument Native Plant Nursery: Create a local source for native/local plant materials used in restoration activities; provide educational opportunities for the Monument School; reduce costs of conservation plants offered to local landowners; and improve a. Develop plant materials collection and sale contract templates.
. b. Purchase supplies and equipment for the collection and care of native plants in the nursery.
. c. Collect cottonwood and other native materials for "banking" in the nursery.
. d. Provide funds to "buy down" the landowner costs for conservation trees.
14. Implement 1999 Monitoring Effort: Improve assessments of completed projects and evaluate to a sufficient level in order to assist with future planning efforts. a. Amend or revise the 1998 annual monitoring plan to incorporate 1999 projects as necessary.
. b. Implement specific monitoring efforts including, but not limited to: Collection of water and ambient air temperature data; Monitoring channel.bank configuration changes; and Assess vegetative response.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 07/01/98 09/01/99 7.8%
2 07/01/99 09/01/99 6.6%
3 07/01/98 09/01/99 15.8%
4 07/01/98 09/01/99 7.8%
5 07/01/98 09/01/99 10.2%
6 07/01/99 09/01/99 19.4%
7 07/01/98 09/01/99 14.8%
8 10/01/98 09/01/99 2.3%
9 10/01/98 09/01/99 1.5%
10 10/01/98 09/01/99 6.9%
11 10/01/98 09/01/99 2.1%
12 10/01/98 09/01/99 2.4%
13 10/01/98 09/01/99 1.2%
14 10/01/98 09/01/99 1.2%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 1999 Cost
Supplies $134,424
Travel $ 2,500
Subcontractor Grant Soil and Water Conservation District $ 52,737
Other $ 26,095
Total Itemized Budget $215,756


Total estimated budget

Total FY 1999 project cost $215,756
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 1999 budget request $215,756
FY 1999 forecast from 1998 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

Not applicable  

Other Budget Explanation

Not applicable


Section 6. References

n/a or no information


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract

The project objectives are intended to increase in-season river flows through a combination of irrigation efficiency measures, reduce bank instability, sedimentation, and bedload movement thereby improving water quality, reducing or eliminating migratory delays from passage impediments, improve riparian condition and implement an annual monitoring program. Forty-seven percent of costs will come from sources other than BPA. This project responds to and is consistent with tribal, state and federal goals and objectives within the regions plans and programs. Previous projects of this type have demonstrated success in addressing limiting factors identified for aquatic resource production in the basin. They follow a comprehensive assessment of the watershed and a detailed stream restoration plan. The benefits are to an entirely wild stock and habitat. The projects utilize standard design criteria, and were selected using an interagency evaluation and prioritization process. The effects of project implementation scenarios on river flows and stream temperatures were analyzed through studies of the basin hydrology. Hydrologic and temperature models were prepared for the mainstem to assist in the evaluation. The effects of individual projects were also assessed for impacts on stream flow, temperature, sediment, and other resources. These projects will be incorporated into the annual monitoring plan and follow standard methods for the examination of water and water quality. Channel and riparian surveys will follow standard methods of assessment. In addition to the on-the-ground objectives, the long term restoration needs of the basin will be addressed. Planning will include developing a trust fund based on the restoration needs of the basin.


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

This project has not yet been reviewed

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