Return to Proposal Finder FY 1999 Proposal 199005500

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Steelhead Supplementation Studies in Idaho Rivers
BPA Project Proposal Number 199005500
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Idaho Department of Fish and Game
Business acronym (if appropriate) IDFG
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Alan Byrne
Mailing Address IDFG - Fisheries Research P.O. Box 25
City, State, Zip Boise, ID 83709
Phone 2084658404
Fax 2084658434
E-mail abyrne@idfg.state.id.us
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 1999
Province Lower Snake
Subbasin Salmon, Clearwater
 
Short Description Evaluate the feasibility of using artificial production to increase natural steelhead populations and to collect life history, genetic, and disease data from wild steelhead populations in Idaho.
Target Species


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses:
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses:
Other Planning Document References


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

n/a or no information


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. a. Outplant adults from each brood source into isolated habitat suitable for steelhead. Study streams will be tributaries of Salmon River. Enclose stream section with picket wires. Monitor spawning activity.
. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. b. In stream: Estimate parr production by snorkel surveys, trapping juvenile emigrants, and PIT-tagging.
. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. c. In stream: Estimate the smolt yield and number of emigrants from each brood year in streams by trapping and from PIT-tag detections at mainstem dams.
. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. d. In hatchery: Spawn and rear in the hatchery wild and hatchery brood sources for three consecutive years. Determine % eye-up, survival, growth, health, condition to smolt stage. Handle/rear each brood equally, but in separate raceways at Sawtooth Hatchery.
. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. e. In hatchery: Release PIT-tagged smolts at weir sites to coincide with natural smolt migration. Using PIT tag detections, measure travel time and estimate survival to Lower Granite Dam of outplanted smolts from each brood source.
. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. f. In hatchery: Identify the brood source of adults returning to the weir. Compare smolt-to-adult survival, sex ratio, length, weight, age, fecundity, and timing of return of adults of each brood source.
. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. Evaluate the brood sources in a hatchery and natural stream environment. g. Estimate recovery & frequency of supplementation required to establish viable steelhead populations. Establsih & maintain library of supplementation research done elsewhere. Establish contacts & exchange pertinent information with other agencies.
2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. a. Snorkel the South Fork Red River and Red River upstream of the South Fork Red River each summer to obtain baseline juvenile steelhead parr densities.
2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. b. Stock 50,000 marked (45,000 with CWT and 5,00 PIT-tagged) fingerlings reared at Clearwater Hatchery into the South Fork Red River in early September for four consecutive years (done 1993 - 1996).
2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. c. Stock 5000 tagged smolts reared at the Clearwater Hatchery into Red River in April for 4 consecutive years (1996-99).
2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. d. Operate the Red River weir to catch returning adult steelhead from 1997 - 2002. Determine the origin of adults and sex, measure length, and pass upstream.
2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. e. Using the snorkel information compare parr production per female of each group.
2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. f. Estimate recovery rates and the frequency of supplementation required to establish viable steelhead populations from results tasks 1- 5.
3. Assess the abundance, habitat, and life history characteristics of existing wild steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages. a. Use weirs & traps to document timing, number, length, age of wild juvenile steelhead in selected streams.
3. Assess the abundance, habitat, and life history characteristics of existing wild steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages. b. Estimate wild adult steelhead escapement into streams with weirs. Record adult lengths, sex ratio, age, date of return.
3. Assess the abundance, habitat, and life history characteristics of existing wild steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages. c. Obtain baseline genetic (non-lethal sampling of tissue/fins for DNA analysis) and pathogenic data on steelhead populations from representative streams throughout the state.
3. Assess the abundance, habitat, and life history characteristics of existing wild steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages. d. Record temperature throughout the year in selected streams in the Salmon and Clearwater drainages. Presently, we are recording temperatures in 40 streams.
3. Assess the abundance, habitat, and life history characteristics of existing wild steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages. e. Snorkel streams that can serve as indicators of steelhead population within the major drainages. Fish Creek and Gedney Creek are being used as indicator streams for the Lochsa and Selway drainages, respectively.
3. Assess the abundance, habitat, and life history characteristics of existing wild steelhead populations in the Salmon and Clearwater river drainages. f. Using PIT-taggged fish from traps (see task a), estimate steelhead outmigration from each stream, determine growth rate, develop smolt migration timing, and where sample size is large enough estimate smolt-to-adult survival.
4. Evaluate broodstock management at existing hatchery weirs in relation to IDFG natural production objectives. a. Review existing policy for passing adults and stocking hatchery fry, fingerlings, and smolts upstream of hatchery weirs. Monitor adult escapement, juvenile densities, and smolt production, upstream of the weir sites.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 01/01/93 12/01/08 5.0%
2 01/01/93 12/01/03 10.0%
3 01/01/93 12/01/24 70.0%
4 01/01/93 12/01/24 5.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 1999 Cost
Personnel $100,000
Fringe $ 35,000
Supplies $ 8,000
Operating $ 20,000
Capital $ 15,000
Tag $ 23,200
Travel $ 10,000
Subcontractor $ 10,000
Other $ 37,000
Total Itemized Budget $258,200


Total estimated budget

Total FY 1999 project cost $258,200
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 1999 budget request $258,200
FY 1999 forecast from 1998 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2000 2001 2002 2003
All Phases $258,000 $268,000 $278,000 $288,000
Total Outyear Budgets $258,000 $268,000 $278,000 $288,000
 

Other Budget Explanation

Not applicable


Section 6. References

n/a or no information


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract

The goal of supplementation is to use artificial propagation to increase natural fish production without a negative effect on the productivity and abundance of existing natural populations. The Northwest Power Planning Council identified supplementation to generate much of the increases to meet its goal of doubling anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River. The goal of supplementation: an increase in natural production, is a departure from previous hatchery management. Guidelines and procedures for supplementation are not established. This project was designed to investigate potential benefits and risks with small-scale experiments and to develop protocols for biologically sound steelhead supplementation. We used the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) guidelines to formulate the research design. The major objectives of this research are: 1. Assess the performance of hatchery and wild brood sources to reestablish steelhead in streams where extirpated. 2. Evaluate the ability of returning adults from hatchery smolt and fingerling releases to produce progeny in natural streams. 3. Collect baseline population status, life history attributes, and genetic data from wild steelhead populations in key indicator tributaries of the Salmon and Clearwater drainages. We minimized the risk to natural populations of steelhead and chinook salmon by choosing study streams, for Objectives 1 and 2, that are vacant of steelhead or are no longer managed as viable populations. Our manipulative experiments are small-scale, includes stocking for three or four brood years, and are not intended to produce viable populations of steelhead.


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

CBFWA: Nonwatershed Technical Group Comments Recommendation:
Date:
May 13, 1998
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Comments:

Criteria 1: Technical Criteria - Yes

Criteria 2: Objectives Criteria - Yes

Criteria 3: Milestones Criteria - Yes

Criteria 4: Resources Criteria - Yes:


CBFWA Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
May 13, 1998
1999 2000 2001
$258,200 $258,000 $268,000
Comment:

ISRP Review , ISRP 1998-1 Recommendation:
Adequate
Date:
Jun 18, 1998
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
This proposal has three objectives. The first objective is to compare wild and hatchery returns, but returns have not been high enough to implement this objective. This should be done only with considerable caution, due to the extremely small numbers of fish remaining. The second objective is to evaluate whether returning hatchery adults spawn naturally. The third objective is to gather baseline background data. The baseline study ought to be done. The experimental design should be described in greater detail, but is adequate to establish that such important factors as replication, control, and power have been taken into account. The paired watershed design is a good approach and the power analysis establishes that an ecologically meaningful project can be conducted with the sample size possible.

NW Power and Conservation Council's FY 2006 Project Funding Review Funding category:
expense
Date:
May 2005
FY05 NPCC Start of Year:
$589,086
FY06 NPCC Staff Preliminary:
$589,086
FY06 NPCC July Draft Start of Year:
$589,086
Sponsor (IDFG) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

Return to top of page