Return to Proposal Finder FY 2000 Proposal 20126

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Habitat Enhancement Within Transmission Corridors
BPA Project Proposal Number 20126
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
USDA Forest Service, Zigzag Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest
Business acronym (if appropriate) USFS
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Jeff Uebel
Mailing Address Zigzag Ranger District, 70220 E Hwy 26
City, State, Zip Zigzag, OR 97049
Phone 5036223191 680
Fax 5036225622
E-mail juebel/r6pnw_mthood@fs.fed.us
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 2000
Province Columbia Plateau
Subbasin Deschutes
 
Short Description Change vegetation management practices to retain more tree and shrub cover; increase short and long-term coarse woody debris levels and input; reduce terrestrial and riparian habitat impacts; improve connectivity between upland and riparian habitats.
Target Species Lower Columbia River steelhead, coho and chinnook and native cutthroat trout; Mid-Columbia


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 7.6 Habitat Goals, Policies and Objectives; 7.7 Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Public Landowners; 7.7A Coordination of Watershed Activities; 7.7A.1-6; 7.8 Water Availability; 7.10K Passage into Historic Habitat
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses:
Other Planning Document References Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision for Amendments to Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management Planning Documents Within the Range of the Northern Spotted Owl; Standards and Guidelines for Management of Habitat for Late-Successional and Old-Growth Forest Related Species Within the Range of the Northern Spotted Owl; Upper Sandy Watershed Analysis; Mt. Hood Land and Resource Management Plan; Final Environmental Impact Statement, Record of Decision and Mediated Agreement for the Control of Competing and Unwanted Vegetation, A Guide to Conducting Vegetation Management Projects in the Pacific Northwest Region, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments, Sandy River Subbasin BPA Powerline Right-of-Way Management Integrated Resource Analysis


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): wildlife


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

n/a or no information


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Maintain transmission line and tower safety. a. Prevent growth of vegetation into safety zone around each line and tower. Cut all vegetation within safety zone or which will grow into safety zone within 5 years around each line and tower.
1. b. Maintain vegetation height within 35 feet of transmission tower at 3 feet or lower. Site prep and establish native grasses - use as seed source - and low shrubs - huckleberries, etc.
2. Improve and retain streamside shading, species and structural diversity. a. Plant appropriate native trees and shrubs within riparian zone (except areas with well stocked and established tree/shrub component if desired/preferred species).
2. b. Remove tallest vegetation/individuals encroaching into safety zones; thin remainder. Retain a mix of species including both trees and shrub species. Apply range of residual spacings.
2. c. Prune trees to maintain and/or enhance shrub understory cover and shade.
2. d. Use solar pathfinder to determine level of solar radiation reaching stream. Use on at least 4 of the streams with temperature monitoring stations.
2. e. Establish camera points w/ associated photo points in representative stream areas. Photography bimonthly between May 1 and Oct 31 to visually monitor vegetative changes.
2. f. Conduct stand exam every 5 to 10 years depending upon safety zone height (5 yrs if <20 ft; 10 yrs if >20 ft). Include data in district GIS.
2. g. Develop and use special product sales to control vegetation. Limit amount of material removed during contract period. Where appropriate, collect KV funds for expected planting, thinning, pruning or other site betterment projects.
3. Reduce existing stream temperatures 1 to 4 degrees F below existing levels. a. Establish temperature monitoring stations above and below where streams enter and leave the corridor. Establish stations on at least 8 streams along the length of the corridor within the district boundary. Monitor daily.
3. b. Determine existing temperature regimes in the 8 streams.
3. c. Monitor solar radiation reaching stream on at least 4 of the streams being monitored. Perform 1 time per year between June 15 and July 15.
3. d. Locate and establish photomonitoring points within representative streamside/riparian areas to monitor canopy development and shading; 1 camera point & associated photo points per representative site. Monitor bimonthly between May 1 and Oct 31 yearly.
3. e. Establish and maintain an average shade cover of 75%; avoid actions which reduce cover below 50% (see objective 1a-c and f above).
4. Improve and maintain riparian travel corridors between upland, late successional habitats within the Bull Run Watershed Management Unit and high quality late successional and old growth habitats along the Clear Fork of the Sandy River. a. Plant Douglas fir and western red cedar under existing red alder and black cottonwood stands. Thin and release existing, established understory conifers favoring cedar and Douglas fir. Convert from hardwood to predominately conifer stands within 30 yrs,
4. b. Thin to increase diameter growth of Douglas fir and cedar present in overstory. Retain alder and other species for diversity.
4. c. Prune 100-150 overstory conifers/acre to maintain/enhance understory development/diversity.
4. d. Retain largest cut trees as snag or coarse woody debris; remove those excess to needs as firewood or other products. Collect KV funds to accomplish additional planting, thinning, pruning or other site improvement projects within the corridor.
4. e. Conduct stand exam at least every 10 years to monitor stand development and identify treatment needs/opportunities to maintain or enhance desired habitat needs or characteristics. Incorporate data into district GIS system.
4. f. Establish at least 1 camera point with associated photo points within each riparian travel corridor. Photograph yearly to monitor yearly vegetative changes.
5. Maintain/improve hiding cover and forage for wildlife. a. Plant native shrub and tree species which produce nuts, fruits, berries or other food materials preferred by birds and animals.
5. b. Thin vegetation at varying spacings; include random and irregular openings.
5. c. Prune conifers to establish/maintain diverse and healthy understory vegetation.
5. d. Maintain limited site distances into right-of-way corridor by retaining higher densities of trees, limiting the height and the number of trees pruned and by maintaining a healthy and vigorous understory.
5. e. Develop and use special product contracts/sales to control the quantity and location of removals.
5. f. Conduct stand exam at least every 10 years to monitor stand and vegetation development and condition and identify treatment needs/opportunities to maintain or enhance desired habitat needs or characteristics. Include in GIS system.
6. Increase the number and distribution of snags and coarse woody debris. a. Identify sites/areas where transmission line/tower safety zone considerations allow trees to reach heights of 30 ft or more.
6. b. Locate 5-10 trees per acre (DF or cedar preferred; others acceptable) suitable for retention/development as future snag/coarse woody debris recruitment. Thin all other trees away on a 20-25 ft spacing to increase diameter growth and increase limb size.
6. c. Top any selected tree within 15 ft of the safety zone around lines; remove all live branches within 10 ft of the removed top to reduce the risk or need for future treatment.
6. d. Obtain large logs (30 ft or greater in length, 24 inch diameter (small end)) from outside of the corridor area; place on sites where coarse woody debris is deficit, terrain less than 40% and with good access. Use ground based equipment.
7. Reduce the area and number of noxious weeds and other invasive non-native species. a. Establish and maintain native vegetation to shade out or prevent the regeneration of scotch broom and other invasive species in areas where such species are limited in area or number.
7. b. Implement biocontrol measures where there are large concentrations of invasive non-natives and/or noxious weeds.
7. c. Develop and implement manual control measures to reduce the population and extent of scotch broom in the lower half of the powerline corridor.
7. d. Conduct a stand exam at least every 10 years; include location and extent of existing noxious weed and other invasive non-native species.
8. Vegetation management activities will ultimately be self-supporting through the development and harvest special products or through funds generated by the sale of such products. a. Finalize and implement the special products plan developed between 1990 and 1996.
8. b. Work with BPA natural resource specialists and maintenance foremen to insure line and tower safety/access.
8. c. Work with Warm Springs natural resources, Cultural and Heritage Committee and interested tribal members to address and meet tribal and tribal member needs and to meet treaty rights.
9. Technology transfer with Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs a. Assist tribal resource specialists/tribal members to identify existing agreements, contracts, constraints etc. and locations of activities with Warm Springs transmission line corridor.
9. b. Assist tribal resource specialist to identify needs, opportunities, constraints within corridor. Use Zigzag experience as model.
10. Continued technology transfer with BPA natural resource specialists. a. Encourage BPA natural resource specialist and line maintenance foreman participation in vegetation management project planning and development.
10. b. Data collection and analysis, conceptual plan development for Larch Mountain transmission line corridor.
11. Technology transfer within the Forest Service, other governmental agencies and other land managers. a. Provide technical expertise and experience to other forests, districts and other land managers (public and private) as requested.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 10/01/99 09/01/99 15.0%
2 10/01/99 09/01/15 Establish and maintain streamside vegetation including species and structural diversity. 22.0%
3 10/01/99 09/01/09 Reduce current stream temperatures 1-4 degrees F. 2.0%
4 10/01/99 09/01/99 Increase species and structural diversity; increase number of large Douglas fir and western red cedar. 5.0%
4 10/01/99 09/01/99 Increase number, distribution and creation of snags; increase number and distribution of coarse woody debris 5.0%
5 10/01/99 09/01/99 Establish and maintain diverse wildlife forage and cover; favor berries, nuts etc. 10.0%
6 10/01/99 09/01/99 Develop 5-10 trees per acre of large diameter trees for future snag recruitment and future coarse woody debris input (also objective 4). 5.0%
6 10/01/99 09/01/02 Increase number and distribution of coarse woody debris. 10.0%
7 10/01/99 09/01/99 Reduce the number and area of noxious weeds and other invasive non-native plants. 10.0%
8 10/01/99 09/01/14 1.0%
9 10/01/99 09/01/99 5.0%
10 10/01/99 09/01/99 5.0%
11 10/01/99 09/01/99 5.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2000 Cost
Personnel 400 days @ GS-9; 400 days@ GS-7 - $90,000 $ 90,000
Fringe 39000 $ 39,000
Supplies $13,000 - temperature gauges, seedlings and incidental supplies. $ 13,000
Operating $90,000 for TSI, planting, stand exam and coarse wood debris placement contracts $ 90,000
NEPA 1 analysis for all projects for 5 years, 2000-2004: $20,000 $ 15,000
Travel $7500 for rigs (FOR & Mileage), travel, etc. $ 7,500
Other District overhead @ 21% $ 54,000
Total Itemized Budget $308,500


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2000 project cost $308,500
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2000 budget request $308,500
FY 2000 forecast from 1999 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Organization Item or service provided Amount Cash or In-Kind
USFS KV collections from special product sales $ 4,500 unknown
BPA Site Prep - Dozer rental @$65/hr for 40 hr. $ 2,600 unknown

 

Outyear Budget Totals

2001 2002 2003 2004
All Phases $170,000 $177,000 $184,000 $191,000
Total Outyear Budgets $170,000 $177,000 $184,000 $191,000
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: Plans will need to be updated or completed to identify specific locations and projects. NEPA analysis will be necessary for all project work. Specialists may be unavailable or have limited time to do planning, analysis and implementation.


Section 6. References

Reference Watershed?
Mt. Hood National Forest. 1990 Land and Resource Manage Plan Mt. Hood National Forest USDA Forest Service, Sandy OR. No
USDA Forest Service and USDI Bureau of Land Management. 1994. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Amendments to Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management Planning Documents In the Range of the Northern Spotted Owl Portland, Oregon. Yes
USDA Forest Service and USDI Bureau of Land Management. 1994. Record of Decision for Amendments to Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management Planning Documents Within the Range of the Northern Spotted Owl Portland, Oregon. Yes
USDA Forest Service and USDI Bureau of Land Management. 1994. Standards and Guidelines for Management of Habitat for Late-Successional and Old Growth Forest Related Species Within the Range of the Northern Spotted Owl Portland, Oregon. Yes
Mt. Hood National Forest. 1996. Upper Sandy Watershed Analysis. USDA Forest Service, Mt. Hood National Forest, Sandy, Oregon. Yes
Zigzag Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest. 1994 Sandy River Subbasin BPA Powerline Right-of-Way Management Integrated Resource Analysis BPA Project No. 93-91, Zigzag Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, Zigzag, Oregon. Yes
Northwest Power Planning Council. 1994 and as amended 1995 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 94-55, Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, Oregon. Yes
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region. 1990 A Guide to Conducting Vegetation Management Projects in the Pacific Northwest Region Forest Pest Management, Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service. Portland, OR. No
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region 1988 Record of Decision and Final Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Competing and Unwanted Vegetation Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service, Portland, OR. No
Burns, Judge James M., US District Court for the District of Oregon 1989 Mediated Agreement between the Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service and Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, et. al. No


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract

This project proposes to change vegetation management within a high voltage transmission line corridor. It proposes to develop, enhance and maintain fish and wildlife habitat while maintaining transmission tower and line safety and the safe and efficient transport of electrical power. It proposes to use the development, management and harvest of special forest products to do much of the vegetation management and and to help the program ultimately become economically self-sufficient. The project will restore connectivity between late successional and old growth habitats separated by a regularly disturbed transmission corridor. Snag and coarse woody debris numbers and distribution will be enhanced where feasible and practicable. Controlling vegetation which affects or will affect line and tower safety will increase hiding cover, reduce sight distances and enhance forage for wildlife and maintain higher shading levels along streams. Monitoring and evaluation will include periodic and regular vegetation exams, photo monitoring and the establishment and monitoring of stream temperature gauges. The project will continue as long as there are transmission lines in the Lolo Pass area.


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

This project has not yet been reviewed

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