Return to Proposal Finder FY 2000 Proposal 20142

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Snake River Temperature Control Project, Phase III
BPA Project Proposal Number 20142
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, University of Idaho, Oregon Graduate Institute
Business acronym (if appropriate) CRITFC
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Jeff Fryer
Mailing Address 729 NE Oregon, Suite 200
City, State, Zip Portland, OR 97232
Phone 5037311266
Fax 5032354228
E-mail fryj@critfc.org
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 2000
Province Columbia Plateau
Subbasin Snake Lower
 
Short Description Accurate characterization of Lower Snake River temperatures correlated with adult fall chinook salmon and steelhead passage and spawning success, and development of a flow/temperature management plan to maximize benefits of providing cooler water.
Target Species Fall chinook salmon Steelhead


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 5.1A.1, 6.1D.7, 7.5B.3
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses: VI.A.1.b.4), VI.A.1.c.2, Incidental Take statement 17
Other Planning Document References Wy-kan-ush miwa-kish-wit


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

n/a or no information


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

Project ID Title Description Umbrella
Lower Columbia River Adult Passage Project Overlaps with Corps project which is tagging 1000 fall chinook to measure fallback and survival rates No


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Develop a next-generation monitoring and modeling system for the Snake River Basin. a. Implement a tri-level thermograph monitoring system in the Lower Snake River.
1. b. Pilot integration of detailed monitoring and modeling for the Little Goose reservoir
1. c. Development of a real-time monitoring and modeling system for the Snake River Basin
2. Characterize temporal and 3D spatial variability of temperature as a function of hydrosystem operations a. Simulate flow and temperature distribution for actual hydrosystem operations for the duration of the project.
2. b. Characterize model biases and uncertainties
2. c. Relate occurrence and characteristics of cooler corridors and pools to seasonality and hydrosystems operation
3. Characterize migration of adult fall chinook migrating through the Snake River. a. Tag Snake River chinook and steelhead at Ice Harbor, Bonneville and Lower Granite dams with temperature and depth-sensitive radio tags
3. b. Monitor passage of radio tagged fish through the lower Snake River.
3. c. Relate salmonid behavior to temperature distributions.
4. Explore management options to enhance fall chinook salmon behavior a. Simulate flow and temperature distribution for a range of scenarios of hydrosystem exploration
4. b. Contrast occurrence and characteristics of bulk reservoir temperatures and cooler corridors and pools for the various scenarios hydrosystems operation
4. c. Promote the development of consensus planning for strategies that improve migration of adult salmonids.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 10/01/99 09/01/03 Develop a next-generation monitoring and modeling system for the Snake River Basin. Installation of tri-level thermographs 43.0%
2 10/01/99 09/01/03 Characterize temporal and 3D spatial variability of temperature as a function of hydrosystem operations 26.0%
3 10/01/99 09/01/03 Characterize migration of fall chinook migrating through the Snake River. 50-60 fall chinook and steelhead tagged per year 31.0%
4 11/01/00 09/01/03 Explore management options to enhance fall chinook salmon behavior 0.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2000 Cost
Personnel $ 35,100
Fringe $ 11,056
Supplies $ 1,000
Capital Archival transmitters $ 0
Travel $ 5,000
Indirect $ 19,245
Subcontractor University of Idaho-Radio Tagging $114,198
Subcontractor Scientist $ 5,000
Subcontractor University of Idaho-Monitoring $120,000
Subcontractor Oregon Graduate Institute $250,692
Subcontractor Mal Karr $ 3,200
Total Itemized Budget $564,491


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2000 project cost $564,491
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2000 budget request $564,491
FY 2000 forecast from 1999 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Organization Item or service provided Amount Cash or In-Kind
USGS Salary for Dr. Ted C. Bjornn $ 10,000 unknown

 

Outyear Budget Totals

2001 2002 2003
All Phases $635,102 $579,453 $394,861
Total Outyear Budgets $635,102 $579,453 $394,861
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: Tagging schedule may be constrained by the schedule of releases of cold water from Lower Dworshak.


Section 6. References

Reference Watershed?
Baptista, A.M., M. Wilkin, et al. 1998. Towards a multi-purpose forecast system for the Columbia River estuary. Ocean Community Conference '98, Baltimore, Maryland. 6 pp. No
Bennett D. et al. 1997. Thermal and velocity characteristics in the lower Snake River reservoirs, Washington, as a result of regulated upstream water releases. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers final completion report. Project 14-16-0009-1579. 178 pp. No
Bjornn, T.C. and five authors. 1998. Passage of chinook salmon through the lower Snake River and distribution into the tributaries, 1991-1993, Part 1 of final report. University of Idaho for U.S. Corps of Engineers and Bonneville Power Adminstration. Yes
Blumberg, A.F., and G.L. Mellor, 1995. A description of a three-dimensional coastal ocean circulation model. In Three-Dimensional Coastal Ocean Models, v. 4, N. Heaps, ed., AGU, 1-16. No
Karr, M. H. 1992. Snake River water temperature control project, 1992 operations and results. Summary report. Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR. No
Karr, M. H. 1993. Snake River water temperature control project, 1993 operations and results. Summary report. Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR. No
Karr, M. H., B. Tanovan, et al. 1992. Snake River water temperature control project interim report: Model studies and 1991 operations. Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, University of Idaho. No
Lynch, D.R., Ip, J.T.C., Naimie, C.E., and F.E. Werner. 1996. Comprehensive Coastal Circulation Model with Application to the Gulf of Maine, Continental Shelf Research, 16(7), 875-906. No
McKenzie S., 1998. Assembly and Review of Available Continuous Temperature Data, Columbia/Snake River Mainstem Water Temperature Workshop, Portland Conference Center, Dec. 3-4, Abstract. No
Yearsley J. and K. Whilden, 1998. Description of Temperature Assessment Model, Columbia/Snake River Mainstem Water Temperature Workshop, Portland Conference Center, Dec. 3-4, Abstract. No


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract

Enhanced understanding of temperature effects on fish migration is critical to the effective and ecologically sound management of the Columbia/Snake hydrosystem. We hypothesize that: H1: Natural and operationally induced thermal stratification create cooler-water features in reservoirs that are of significance to adult migrants, particularly fall chinook salmon in the Lower Snake River (LSR). H2: Management of thermal stratification is a feasible and effective complement to maintaining bulk reservoir temperature below pre-determined limits. H3: Technology exists to develop integrated monitoring and modeling systems able to reliably guide the management of thermal stratification towards improved fish passage. To evaluate H1 and H2, we propose to investigate the 3D spatial distribution of temperature in the LSR and to enhance understanding of the response of fall chinook salmon to this distribution. In the process, we will demonstrate H3. Temperature distribution will be described through integrated real-time monitoring and modeling. Monitoring will include tri-level thermograph observations, complemented by higher-density thermistor chains. Ancillary meteorological and flow data will also be collected. Modeling will use numerical solutions of flow and heat balance equations, resulting in 3D descriptions of water levels, velocities and temperatures. Fish behavior will be determined by radio tagging and monitoring migration of fall chinook salmon and steelhead throughout the LSR. Tags will record temperatures and depths experienced by migrating fish. Migration information will be correlated in space-time with temperature distributions from system-wide modeling and monitoring. This correlation will be used with scenario modeling to explore enhancement of fish passage through hydrosystem management.


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

This project has not yet been reviewed

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