Return to Proposal Finder FY 2000 Proposal 199005200

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Performance/Stock Productivity Impacts of Hatchery Supplementation
BPA Project Proposal Number 199005200
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Biological Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey (formerly National Biological Survey)
Business acronym (if appropriate) BRD
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Reg Reisenbichler
Mailing Address Western Fisheries Research Center, 6505 NE 65th St
City, State, Zip Seattle, WA 98115
Phone 2065266282
Fax 2065266654
E-mail reg_reisenbichler@
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 2000
Province Mainstem/Systemwide
Subbasin Systemwide
 
Short Description Measure genetic effects from artificial propagation of steelhead and spring chinook to provide increased understanding of the reputed failure of steelhead supplementation in Idaho's Clearwater River and an improved basis for planning, conducting, and eval
Target Species Steelhead and (spring) chinook salmon


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 7.3B.2
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses: N/A
Other Planning Document References Independent Science Group 1996; National Research Council 1996.


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

Year Accomplishment
1995 Publication: Reisenbichler, R.R., and G.S. Brown. 1995. Is Genetic Change From Hatchery Rearing of Anadromous Fish Really a Problem? Pages 578-579 in H.L. Schramm, Jr., & R.G. Piper [eds] Uses and Effects of Cultured Fishes in Aquatic Ecosystems. America
1996 Publication: Reisenbichler, R.R. 1996. Effects of supplementation with hatchery fish on carrying capacity and productivity of naturally spawning populations of steelhead. Pages 81-92 in G.E. Johnson, D.A. Neitzel, and W.V. Mavros [eds.] Proceedings from
1997 Publication: Reisenbichler, R.R.. 1997. Genetic factors contributing to declines of anadromous salmonids in the Pacific Northwest. Pages 223-244 in D.J. Stouder, P.A. Bisson, and R. J. Naiman [eds.] Pacific Salmon and Their Ecosystems: Status and Future
1998 Reisenbichler, R.R. 1998. Questions and partial answers about supplementation--genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish. Pages 29-38 In E.L. Brannon and W.C. Kinsel [eds] Proceedings of the Columbia River anadromous salmonid rehabilitation and p
1998 Publication in review: Reisenbichler, R.R., and S.P. Rubin. Genetic changes from artificial propagation of Pacific salmon affect the productivity and viability of supplemented populations. ICES Journal of Marine Science.


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Compare the growth and survival of genetically marked offspring from wild, Clearwater River, steelhead (W) and from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery (Dworshak NFH) steelhead (H) rearing together in two natural streams in the Clearwater River system, Idaho. 1. Sample hatchery fish at Dworshak NFH, and capture wild adults at Selway Falls. Determine the dipeptidase (PEPA) genotypes of adults; retain only wild fish homozygous for the common allele (up to 30 females and 20 males), only hatchery fish homozygous for
1. 1. Sample juveniles residing in the streams at the end of each growing season, and trap juveniles migrating downstream. Determine relative survival and size of the offspring of HxH, HxW, and WxW fish. Estimate the standing stock of experimental fish in the
2. Compare the growth and survival of genetically marked offspring of wild spring chinook salmon from Warm Springs River (W) and of Warm Springs Hatchery fish (H) in two natural streams near the Deschutes River system, Oregon. Comparisons of HxH and WxW f 2. Capture hatchery and wild adults, combine their gametes to create genetically marked groups of HxH, HxW, and WxW fish at the superoxide dismutase (s-SOD) locus, and release these experimental groups of fish as eyed embryos or swim-up fry in the Little Whi
2. 2. Sample juveniles residing in the study streams at the end of each growing season, and trap juveniles migrating downstream. Determine relative survival and size of the offspring of hatchery and wild fish.
3. Compare the growth and survival of genetically marked offspring from local wild fish (W) and from hatchery fish (H) in hatchery ponds at Dworshak, Clearwater, or Warm Springs hatcheries. Comparisons of HxH and WxW fish will be completed for each of four 3. Rear genetically marked HxH, HxW, and WxW groups of fish, spawned in Tasks 1a or 2a, together in hatchery troughs or ponds using standard hatchery rearing practices and release the fish at the standard time of release.
3. 3. Compare the relative survival and size of experimental fish shortly before the standard release date.
3. 3. Mark the experimental fish with an external mark so that they can be recognized when they return as adults. Determine relative return rates and sizes of these fish when they return as adults. Approximately 100 juvenile spring chinook salmon will be tran
4. Test for selection on the genetic marks by comparing the growth and survival of juvenile fish with the different genotypes rearing together in natural streams and in hatcheries. The test fish will be the offspring of hatchery fish. The tests will be rep 4. At the respective hatcheries, mate adults heterozygous at the locus used for genetic marks (sSOD-1 or PEPA). Release at least 20,000 of the resulting fish (from each year-class) in a study stream, and rear at least 60,000 in the hatchery.
4. 4. Take a sample of juvenile fish from the study stream at the end of each growing season, and determine the mean size and relative survival of fish with the different genotypes.
4. 4. Compare the relative survival and size of experimental fish with the different genotypes immediately before the standard release date at the hatchery.
4. 4. Determine relative return rates and sizes of fish with the different genetic marks when they return to the hatchery as adults.
5. Determine the effect of egg size on subsequent growth and survival of juvenile steelhead in streams and in the hatchery. Conduct the experiment with two year-classes of steelhead from Dworshak NFH. 5. Take eggs and determine egg size from approximately 60 females. Divide the lots of eggs into three size categories (small, medium, large). Split the milt from males so that each male fertilizes the eggs from one female in each size category. Thermally
5. 5. Take a sample of juvenile fish from the study stream(s) at the end of each growing season, and determine the mean size and relative survival of fish from the different size groups.
5. 5. Compare the relative size and survival of fish from the different size groups immediately before the standard release date for Dworshak NFH.
6. Test for an effect of incubation temperature by comparing the growth and survival of juvenile steelhead from matings early in the season, incubated at 7?C and from matings made later, incubated at 12?C. Crosses will be timed to result in simultaneous eme 6. Spawn adult steelhead at Dworshak NFH on the appropriate dates and incubate at the respective temperatures to achieve simultaneous button-up. Mark the otoliths of the juveniles thermally. Release approximately one-half of the resulting fish (from early a
6. 6. Take a sample of juvenile fish from the study stream at the end of each growing season, and determine the mean size and relative abundance of fish from the two treatments (early, 7?C vs. late, 12?C).
6. 6. Compare the relative survival and size of early and late experimental fish immediately before the standard release date at the hatchery.
6. 6. Determine relative return rates and sizes of fish with the different genetic marks when they return to the hatchery as adults.
7. Test for an effect of cryopreservation by comparing the growth and mortality, and the response to various stressors of juvenile fish from “fresh” and cryopreserved milt. Juvenile fish will be reared at the Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) and sub 7. Take milt from at least 12 hatchery males. Divide the milt into two equal portions; cryopreserve one portion and hold the other portion in plastic bags filled with oxygen and held on ice. Take the eggs from the same number of female hatchery fish. Divi
7. 7. Split each treatment (fresh or cryopreserved milt) group for each mating, and incubate separately at WFRC until button-up. Divide each family and assign to rearing vessels so that each family is represented equally in each vessel. Two sets of tanks will
7. 7. Monitor the growth and survival, by treatment, of the fish in the mixed tanks, and test for differences between treatments. During December-February, as the fish approach age-1, divide the fish from the unmixed tanks into replicate vessels, and evaluate

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 06/01/91 07/01/02 N/A 17.0%
2 06/01/91 12/01/02 19.0%
3 06/01/91 12/01/02 17.0%
4 06/01/91 12/01/02 20.0%
5 01/01/95 12/01/01 20.0%
6 01/01/94 06/01/00 7.0%
7 01/01/96 12/01/99 0.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2000 Cost
Personnel $179,726
Fringe $ 54,280
Supplies $ 9,000
Operating $ 24,600
PIT tags 300 $ 870
Travel $ 17,958
Indirect $116,675
Subcontractor $ 92,123
Total Itemized Budget $495,232


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2000 project cost $495,232
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2000 budget request $495,232
FY 2000 forecast from 1999 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Organization Item or service provided Amount Cash or In-Kind
U.S. Geological Survey Personnel & equipment $ 50,200 unknown

 

Outyear Budget Totals

2001 2002
All Phases $519,000 $485,000
Total Outyear Budgets $519,000 $485,000
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: Timely or successful completion of objectives 2-5 depend on adequate escapements of hatchery or wild adults.


Section 6. References

Reference Watershed?
Chilcote, M.W., S.A. Leider, and J.J. Loch. 1986. Differential reproductive success of hatchery and wild summer-run steelhead under natural conditions. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 115(5): 726-735. No
Hindar, K., N. Ryman, and F. Utter. 1991. Genetic effects of cultured fish on natural fish populations. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 48: 945-957. No
Independent Science Group. 1996. Return to the River. Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR. Prepublication copy. No
Leider, S.A., P.L. Hulett, J.J. Loch, and M.W. Chilcote. 1990. Electrophoretic comparison of the reproductive success of naturally spawning transplanted and wild steelhead trout through the returning adult stage. Aquaculture 88(3-4): 239-252 No
National Research Council. 1996. Upstream: salmon and society in the Pacific Northwest. No
Nickelson, T.E., M.F. Solazzi, and S.L. Johnson. 1986. Use of hatchery coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) presmolts to rebuild wild populations in Oregon coastal streams. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 43(12): 2443-2449. No
Reisenbichler, R.R., and J.D. McIntyre. 1977. Genetic differences in growth and survival of juvenile hatchery and wild steelhead trout, Salmo gairdneri. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 34(1): 123128. No
Reisenbichler, R.R. 1996. Effects of supplementation with hatchery fish on carrying capacity and productivity of naturally spawning populations of steelhead. Pages 81-92 in G.E. Johnson, D.A. Neitzel, and W.V. Mavros [eds.] Proceedings from a Workshop on No


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

This project has not yet been reviewed

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