Return to Proposal Finder FY 2000 Proposal 199107200

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program
BPA Project Proposal Number 199107200
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Idaho Department of Fish and Game
Business acronym (if appropriate) IDFG
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Paul A. Kline
Mailing Address 1800 Trout Rd.
City, State, Zip Eagle, ID 83616
Phone 2089394114
Fax 2089392415
E-mail pkline@idfg.state.id.us
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 2000
Province Mountain Snake
Subbasin Salmon
 
Short Description Establish captive broodstocks of Redfish Lake sockeye salmon. Spawn captive adults to produce eggs, juveniles, and adults for supplementation and future broodstock needs. Monitor nursery lake conditions. Evaluate juvenile outmigration by release option.
Target Species Snake River Sockeye Salmon


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 7.4D Captive Brood Stocks, 7.4E Cryopreservation, 7.5A.1 Snake River Sockeye Salmon
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses: Endangered Species Act recovery effort
Other Planning Document References NMFS T.M.# NMFS-NWFSC-2 Pacific Salmon and Artificial Propagation Under the Endangered Species Act. Numerous references to the utility of captive programs in recovery efforts. Reference to the development of comprehensive spawning matrices and the need for milt cryopreservation. NMFS Pre-decisional Snake River Salmon Recovery Plan - Chapter 3, Numerical Escapement Goals (page 47); Chapter 7, Artificial Propagaton (pages 99-100). NWPPC Return to the River - Chapter 8, Conclusion #10 under Hatcheries - Identifies hatchery programs for severely depressed stocks important sources of genetic information. Evaluations called for ty the ISG are essential and active components of the IDFG Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program. CBFWA FY1999 DraftAnnual Implementation Work Plan - Pages 152-154.


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

Year Accomplishment
1991 Development of first broodstock from the four anadromous adult returns (BY91 spawning).
First cryopreservation of sockeye milt.
Excellent rearing survival of wild -captured outmigrants transferred to Eagle Hatchery.
Primary facility improvements made to accommodate program at Eagle Hatchery.
1992 Cryopreservation of milt from the single male anadromous adult return.
First collection of residual sockeye salmon.
Development of a limited residual broodstock (BY92 spawning)
1993 Development of broodstocks from the eight anadromous adult returns (BY93 spawning). Maturing outmigrants collected in 1991 incorporated in the spawning matrix.
Cryopreservation of milt from anadromous males and captive outmigrants.
First release of pre-spawn adults (20) in Redfish Lake in September.
1994 Development of BY94 broodstocks from the single female anadromous adult return and first generation male progeny from BY91.
Development of BY94 supplementation groups using captive outmigrants and first generation progeny from BY91.
First release of pre-smolts (~14,200) to Redfish Lake.
Second release of pre-spawn adults (65) in Redfish Lake in September.
1995 Development of limited broodstocks using wild - captured residual and captive outmigrants (BY95 spawning).
Approximately 85,000 pre-smolts released in Redfish Lake using several supplementation strategies.
Approximately 9,000 pre-smolts released in Pettit Lake.
Approximately 850 hatchery-produced outmigrants (from 1994 supplementation) successfully overwintered and outmigrated as smolts in 1995.
First program smolt release (~3,800) in Redfish Lake Creek.
IDFG re-opens Redfish Lake kokanee fishery to help manage kokanee competition.
1996 Development of BY96 broodstocks from the single female anadromous adult return and first generation male progeny from BY93.
Development of BY96 supplementation groups using first generation progeny from BY93.
First development of safety net broodstock using cryopreserved milt.
Approximately 2,000 pre-smolts released in Redfish Lake.
First plant of eyed-eggs (~105,000) in Redfish Lake.
Pre-spawn adults (120) released to Redfish Lake with subsequent identification of approximately 30 redds.
Approximately 14,900 hatchery-produced outmigrants (from 1995 Redfish and Pettit lake supplementation) successfully overwintered and outmigrated as smolts in 1996.
Approximately 11,500 smolts released in Redfish Lake Creek.
1997 Development of BY97 supplementation groups using first generation progeny from BY94.
Approximately 250,000 pre-smolts released in three lakes.
Pre-spawn adults released to Redfish (80), Alturas (20), and Pettit (20) lakes. Redds observed in Redfish and Pettit lakes.
Eyed-eggs planted in Redfish (85,000) and Alturas (20,000) lakes.
Approximately 400 hatchery-produced outmigrants (from 1996 supplementation) successfully overwintered and outmigrated as smolts in 1997.
1998 Development of BY98 supplementation groups using first generation progeny from BY96 (females) and BY94 males.
Development of BY98 safety net groups using first generation progeny from BY96 (females), the single 1998 anadromous male return, and cryopreserved milt.
Approximately 142,000 pre-smolts released in three lakes.
Approximately 82,000 smolts released in Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River.
Approximately 58,400 hatchery-produced outmigrants (from 1997 supplementation) successfully overwintered and outmigrated as smolts in 1997.


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

Project ID Title Description Umbrella
9204000 Redfish Lake Captive Broodstock Rearing and Research Duplicate broodstock research and rearing by NMFS. Cooperative culture program contributing to the development of broodstocks for spawning and for supplementation. No
9107100 Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat Improvement Cooperative program by Shoshone-Bannock Tribes. Generates limnology and fish population information critical to overall recovery effort. Active lake fertilization program. No
9009300 Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus nerka University of Idaho genetic studies of broodstock and wild sockeye. Generates mtDNA data for program. No
8909600 Genetic Monitoring and Evaluation of Snake River Salmon and Steelhead NMFS genetic studies of broodstock and wild sockeye. Generates allozyme data for program. No
9305600 Assessment of Captive Broodstock Technology NMFS directed captive propagation research. Generates data on a range of subjects relevant to the program. No
9700100 Captive Rearing Initiative for Salmon River Chinook Salmon IDFG captive rearing experiment for Salmon River chinook salmon. Develops rearing protocols relevant to the program. IDFG Eagle Hatchery shares sockeye and chinook rearing responsibilities. No


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Develop captive broodstocks from Redfish Lake anadromous sockeye salmon. a. Develop the technology for captive broodstock propagation to meet program needs.
1. b. Trap returning anadromous adults, juvenile outmigrants, and residual sockeye salmon.
1. c. Quantify survival, maturation rates, age-at-maturity, sex ratio, and gamete quality of captive sockeye salmon.
1. d. Evaluate time held on chilled water (maturing adults) in relation to gamete quality, fertilization rates, and anomalies in broodstock progeny.
1. e. Establish spawning matrices in consultation with NMFS and the program technical oversight committee.
1. f. Produce genetically defined progeny for use in multiple release strategies to Stanley Basin lakes.
1. g. Collect samples for genetic analysis from all wild sockeye salmon incorporated in the program.
1. h. Cryopreserve milt from specific wild and broodstock sockeye salmon.
1. i. Conduct fertilization trials using cryopreserved milt from captive broodstock adults.
1. j. Maintain cryopreserved archives at three locations to spread the risk of loss from catastrophic events.
1. k. Produce “designer broodstocks” from cryopreserved milt to broaden the genetic base in future brood years.
2. Determine the contribution hatchery-produced sockeye salmon make toward recovery. a. PIT tag wild Redfish Lake outmigrating smolts and hatchery-produced progeny for evaluation purposes.
2. b. Estimate O. nerka outmigration from Stanley Basin lakes.
2. c. Evaluate outmigration success by broodstock lineage and release strategy.
2. d. Examine travel time to lower Snake River hydropower projects and evaluate survival by broodstock lineage and release strategy.
2. e. Identify location, timing, and spawning success for maturing adult broodstock sockeye salmon released to Stanley Basin lakes to spawn volitionally.
3. Describe O. nerka population characteristics for Stanley Basin lakes in relation to carrying capacity and broodstock program supplementation efforts. a. Estimate O. nerka population variables by mid-water trawl in four Stanley Basin lakes.
3. b. Trawl sufficient to estimate abundance and density by age-class.
3. c. Collect scale and otolith samples from trawl captures for age and microchemistry analysis. Take tissue samples for genetic analysis. Take stomachs for diet analysis.
3. d. Develop lake carrying capacity estimates cooperatively with Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.
3. e. Monitor sport fisheries in Redfish Lake to determine their impact on recovery efforts (emphasis on kokanee harvest).
4. Refine our ability to discern the origin of wild and broodstock O. nerka to provide maximum effectiveness in their utilization within the broodstock program. a. Use otolith microchemistry to identify the origin of O. nerka with unknown life histories.
4. b. Integrate microchemistry results with genetic information.
5. Technology Transfer a. Participate in the technical oversight committee process.
5. b. Network with technical experts on issues related to culture and broodstock techniques, genetics, pathology and monitoring and evaluations.
5. c. Continue efforts to develop a program management plan.
5. d. Coordinate public information transfer with project cooperators.
5. e. Provide written activity reports to satisfy the needs and requirements of IDFG, the technical oversight committee, NMFS, and BPA.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 10/01/91 09/01/00 Primary species conservation objective. Broodstock, rearing, spawning and supplementation. yes 65.0%
2 04/01/91 09/01/00 Primary supplementation / production objective. Outmigration monitoring and evaluation data. yes 20.0%
3 09/01/91 09/01/00 Primary critical nursery habitat management objective. Annual lake carrying capacity and supplementation coordination. yes 7.0%
4 10/01/91 09/01/00 Continuing life history monitoring. 3.0%
5 10/01/91 09/01/00 5.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2000 Cost
Personnel $218,900
Fringe $ 74,800
Supplies $ 62,500
Operating $120,183
Capital $ 60,000
PIT tags 6,000 $ 17,400
Travel Includes all costs associated with travel (air & ground transportation, perdiem, lodging). $ 17,250
Indirect 21.3% overhead on Personnel and Operating costs. $109,063
Total Itemized Budget $680,096


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2000 project cost $680,096
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2000 budget request $680,096
FY 2000 forecast from 1999 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2001 2002 2003 2004
All Phases $680,097 $680,000 $680,000 $680,000
Total Outyear Budgets $680,097 $680,000 $680,000 $680,000
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: No known constraints.


Section 6. References

Reference Watershed?
Bjornn, T.C., D.R. Craddock, and D.R. Corley. 1968. Migration and survival of Redfish Lake, Idaho, sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 97:360-373. No
Bromage, N. R. and R. J. Roberts. 1995. Broodstock Management and Egg and Larval Quality. Blackwell Science Ltd. Cambridge, MA. No
Chapman, D.W., W.S. Platts, D. Park, and M. Hill. 1990. Status of Snake River sockeye salmon. Don Chapman Consultants, Inc., Boise, ID. No
Cloud, J.G., Miller, W. H. and M.J. Levenduski. 1990. Cryopreservation of sperm as a means to store salmonid germ plasm and to transfer genes from wild fish to hatchery populations. The Progressive Fish Culturist 52:51-53. No
Cohen, J. 1989. Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences, 2nd ed. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Hillsdale, N.J. No
Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA). 1998. Fiscal Year 1998 Draft Annual Implementation Work Plan, Volume 1. Available from Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR. No
Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (CBFWP). 1994. Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR. No
Erdahl, D. A. 1994. Inland Salmonid Broodstock Management Handbook. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service. 712 FW 1. No
Everman, B.W. 1895. A preliminary report upon salmon investigations in Idaho in 1894. Bulletin of the United States Fisheries Commission, 15:253-284. No
Flagg, T.A. 1993. Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstock rearing and research, 1991-1992. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AI79-92BP41841. 16p. Portland, OR. No
Flagg, T.A., and W.C. McAuley. 1994. Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstock rearing and research, 1991-1993. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AI79-92BP41841. 99p. Portland, OR. No
Flagg, T.A., K.A. Johnson, and J.C. Gislason. 1994. Redfish Lake sockeye salmon broodstock programs. In: Proceedings of the 1993 Alaska Department of Fish and Game Sockeye Culture Workshop. Cooper Landing, Alaska. No
Flagg, T.A., C.V.W. Mahnken, and K. A. Johnson. 1995. Captive broodstocks for recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. American Fisheries Society Symposium 15:81-90. No
Flagg, T.A., W.C. McAuley, M.R. Wastel, D.A. Frost, and C.V.W. Mahnken. 1996. Redfish Lake sockeye salmon captive broodstock rearing and research, 1991-1994. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AI79-92BP41841. 98p. Portland, OR. No
Fleiss, J.L. 1981. Statistical methods for rates and proportions, 2nd ed. Wiley and Sons, New York, NY. No
Hard, J.J., R.P. Jones, M.R. Delarm, and R.S. Waples. 1992. Pacific salmon and artificial propagation under the Endangered Species Act. NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admisistration) Technical Memorandum NMFS (National Marine Fisheries Servi No
Johnson, K. 1992. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. Project No. 91-72, Contract No. DE-B179-91BP21065. No
Johnson, K. 1993. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. Project No. 91-72, Contract No. DE-B179-91BP21065. No
Johnson, K. and J. Pravecek. 1995. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. No. 91-72, DE-B179-91BP21065. No
Johnson, K. and J. Pravecek. 1996. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. No. 91-72, DE-B179-91BP21065. No
Kalish, J.M. 1990. Use of otolith microchemistry to distinguish the progeny of sympatric anadromous and non-anadromous salmonids. Fishery Bulletin, 88: 657-666 No
Kline, P.A. 1994. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. Project No. 91-72, Contract No. DE-BI79-91BP21065. No
Kline, P.A., and J. Younk. 1995. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. No. 91-72, DE-BI79-91BP21065. No
Kline, P.A., and J.A. Lamansky. 1997. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. No. 91-72, DE-BI79-91BP21065. No
Leitritz, E. And R.C. Lewis. 1976. Trout and salmon culture (hatchery methods). California Department of Fish and Game Fish Bulletin 164. No
McArthur, T. 1992. Statewide angler opinion and harvest surveys, creel census system. Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Job Performance Report, Project No. F-71-R-14, Subproject 1, Study 1. Boise, ID No
McDaniel, T.R., K.M. Prett, T.R. Meyers, T.D. Ellison, J.E. Follett, and J.A. Burke. 1994. Alaska Sockeye Salmon Culture Manual. Special Fisheries Report No. 6. Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Juneau. No
Pennell, W. and B.A. Barton. 1996. Principles of Salmonid Aquaculture. Elsevier Science B.V. Amsterdam, The Netherlands. No
Piper, G. R., I. B. McElwain, L.E. Orme, J. P. McCraren, L. G. Gowler, and J. R. Leonard. 1982. Fish Hatchery Management. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D.C. No
Pravecek, J.J. and K.A. Johnson. 1997. Research and recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Annual Report to U.S. DOE, Bonneville Power Administration, Division of Fish and Wildlife. No. 91-72, DE-B179-91BP21065. No
Rieman, B.E. 1992. Kokanee salmon population dynamics - kokanee salmon monitoring guidelines. Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Project No. F-73-R-14, Subproject II, Study II. Boise, ID. No
Rieman, B.E., D.L. Myers, and R.L. Nielsen. 1993. The use of otolith microchemistry to discriminate Oncorhynchus nerka of resident and anadromous origin. Idaho Department of Fish and Game. Boise, ID. No
Schiewe, M.H., T.A. Flagg, and B.A. Berejikian. 1997. The use of captive broodstocks for gene conservation of salmon in the western United States. Bull. Natl. Res. Inst. Aquacult., suppl. 3:29-34. No
Schmitten, R., W. Stelle, Jr., and R. P. Jones. 1997. Draft Proposed Recovery Plan for Snake River Salmon. National Marine Fisheries Service, Portland, OR. No
Sokal, R.R., and F.J. Rohlf. 1981. Biometry, 2nd ed. W.H. Freeman and Company, New York, NY. No
Spaulding, S. 1993. Snake River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) habitat/limnological research, 1992. Report of research to BPA, Contract DE-BI79-91BP22548. Portland, OR. No
Taki, D. and A. Mikkelsen. 1997. Snake River sockeye salmon habitat and limnological research, 1996. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-BI79-91BP22548. Portland, OR. No
Teuscher, D., D. Taki, W.A. Wurtsbaugh, C. Luke, P. Budy, H.P. Gross and G. Steinhart. 1994. Snake River sockeye salmon habitat and limnological research, 1993. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-BI79-91BP22548. Portland, OR. No
Teuscher, D., D. Taki, W.A. Wurtsbaugh, C. Luke, P. Budy, and G. Steinhart. 1995. Snake River sockeye salmon habitat and limnological research, 1994. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-BI79-91BP22548. Portland, OR. No
Teuscher, D., and D. Taki. 1996. Snake River sockeye salmon habitat and limnological research, 1995. Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-BI79-91BP22548. Portland, OR. No
Toole, C.L., and R.L. Nielsen. 1992. Effects of microprobe presicion on hypotheses related to otolith Sr:Ca ratios. Fishery Bulletin 41:239-255. No
Waples, R.S. 1991. Definition of species under the Endangered Species Act: application to Pacific salmon. NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Technical Memorandum NMFS (National Marine Fisheries Service F/NWC-194. No
Wheeler, P. A. , and G. A. Thorgaard. 1991. Cryopreservation of rainbow trout semen in large straws. Aquaculture 93:95-100. No
Zar, J.H. 1974. Biostatistical Analysis. 1974. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ. No


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

ISRP Preliminary Review , ISRP 99-2 Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Jun 15, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Recommendation: Fund. OK for a multi-year review cycle, review again in three to five years.

Comments: This proposal deals with a stock at imminent risk of extinction and continues a long-running captive rearing program. The proposal is clearly written with appropriate objectives and tasks. Project history and accomplishments are well documented, including specific data by year and by lake.

Criticisms of the proposal included that 1) Adult return should be one of the proposal's objectives and should be considered and measured in the tasks, including monitoring and evaluation. Success in the project is measured against smolt numbers (at various life stages), but not against adults, even recognizing that in some ways, this places an unfair burden of proof on the project. Nonetheless, ultimate success of the project (and related projects) depends solely on this parameter. 2) The proposal does not describe benchmarks of criteria that would terminate the project due to success or to failure. Future versions of the proposal should identify those benchmarks and address how they will dictate the ultimate fate of the project. 3). No mention is made of peer-reviewed publications as an end product of the Technology transfer section.


CBFWA Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
2000
$680,000
Comment:

CBFWA: Nonwatershed Technical Group Comments Recommendation:
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Technical Criteria 1: Met? Yes -

Programmatic Criteria 2: Met? No - Objectives do not meet definition.

Milestone Criteria 3: Met? Yes -

Resource Criteria 4: Met? Yes -


CBFWA: Subregional Team Comments Recommendation:
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
This project is important and should continue. We recommend funding in order achieve management objectives in this region. We would like to see an umbrella for all of the sockeye projects in this area for FY01.

NWPPC Funding Recommendation , NWPPC 2000-6 Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Mar 1, 2000
2000
$680,096
Comment:
[Decision made in 9-22-99 Council Meeting]; Funding level determination for BPA

NWPPC Funding Recommendation , NWPPC 2000-6 Recommendation:
Fund at current levels
Date:
Mar 1, 2000
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
(d) captive propagation - (Projects 9009300, 9107200, 9204000, 9305600, 9606700, 9801001, and 9801006 - various sponsors)

Issue: 1) Has NMFS developed a prioritization schedule for captive brood projects as previously requested by the Council, and; 2) if the answer is yes, does the Council find the interim standards for use of captive brood strategies adequately responsive to the Council's concerns that these projects are costly, and the feasibility of the technology is unproven?

Past Council Treatment: In its Fiscal Year 1998 and Fiscal Year 1999 recommendations, the Council expressed several categorical concerns with the captive broodstock projects being proposed for funding: (1) the projects are expensive, (2) they appear to be proliferating, (3) the feasibility of the technology had not been adequately reviewed, and, (4) an underlying question related to the question of whether these projects are primarily "ESA projects" or projects that are consistent with and part of the program funded by Bonneville. In the end, the Council recommended that existing captive broodstock programs be funded, but it called upon NMFS to work with the other anadromous fish managers to develop a set of interim standards for the application of captive broodstock technology. The Council advised that its continued funding support for the NMFS systemwide project was contingent on a set of acceptable standards being developed. The Council also stated that it would not recommend funding for any new captive broodstock projects absent an emergency, without those standards. The Council also stated its intention to require captive broodstock projects to follow the interim 3-step review process for artificial production projects. The Council has also asked that NMFS prioritize captive broodstock projects and provide that schedule to the Council to assist in the review of the budget proposals.

In February of this year, NMFS submitted the interim standards report requested by the Council. The region is using these interim standards as temporary guidance in discussions about captive propagation. The standards were incorporated into the guidelines and performance standards developed in the preservation/conservation purpose of artificial production under the APR process, and are, therefore, consistent with the principles, policies, and purposes as described in the report and recommendations.

Council Recommendation: To date, the Council has not received a prioritization of likely target populations and intervention programs to form a basis for programmatic and budget planning. Therefore, funding levels for existing programs should be held at current levels pending that prioritization. If and when the prioritization is provided, a review of these captive brood programs for consistency with APR report policies and standards must be conducted before additional funds are allocated to these programs or new programs. The Council recommends that projects 9009300, 9107200, 9204000, 9305600, 9606700, 9801001 and 9801006 be funded with the following conditions:

  • Funding should be held at levels required to fund these existing programs pending the prioritization that the Council has previously requested from NMFS, and expansion of existing programs should not be permitted. To date, the Council has not received a prioritization of likely target populations and intervention programs to form a basis for programmatic and budget planning.
  • The Council should not consider any new funding for this technique until adequate review has been completed, and, if possible, subbasin plans are in place.
  • A review of these captive brood programs for consistency with APR report policies and standards should be conducted before additional funds are allocated to these programs or new programs.
  • The Council recommends that the Tucannon project (#20020) be permitted to continue into the three-step artificial production review process. The low-cost and short duration attributes of this project and the status of the run being treated mitigate the Council's general concerns with captive propagation projects in this particular instance. NEPA and planning work may be funded with Fiscal Year 2000 funds, and the sponsor and BPA are to work with Council staff in identifying what needs, if any, there are for that work. Funding for implementation of the project will not be approved until three-step review is complete and applicable documents address the NMFS interim standards as well as the policies, purposes and performance standards in the APR report, and until NEPA requirements are satisfied.

NW Power and Conservation Council's FY 2006 Project Funding Review Funding category:
expense
Date:
May 2005
FY05 NPCC Start of Year:
$825,638
FY06 NPCC Staff Preliminary:
$825,638
FY06 NPCC July Draft Start of Year:
$825,638
Sponsor (IDFG) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

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