Return to Proposal Finder FY 2000 Proposal 199202604

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Life History of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead
BPA Project Proposal Number 199202604
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Business acronym (if appropriate) ODFW
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Richard W. Carmichael
Mailing Address 211 Inlow Hall, EOU, 1410 ā€œLā€ Avenue
City, State, Zip La Grande, OR 97850
Phone 5419623777
Fax 5415684220
E-mail odfw2@eou.edu
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 2000
Province Blue Mountain
Subbasin Grande Ronde
 
Short Description Investigate the abundance, migration patterns, survival, and alternate life history strategies exhibited by spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead from distinct populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins.
Target Species spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 7.1C, 7.1D, 7.4L
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses: Information collected during this study relates to and will be useful for two actions described in the NMFS Hydrosystem Operations Biological Opinion. This study will provide data on multiple detections of wild PIT-tagged salmon at mainstem dams.
Other Planning Document References


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

Year Accomplishment
1994 Deployed rotary screw traps at sites in the Grande Ronde River below upper rearing areas and below Grande Ronde valley.
Pit tagged 1,500 juvenile salmon and obtained recapture data from mainstem dams
Completed annual progress report.
Presentation to Grande Ronde Model Watershed Board of Directors.
1995 Maintained Grande Ronde traps and deployed screw trap in Catherine Creek.
Pit tagged 1,500 juvenile salmon in both Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River and obtained recapture data from mainstem dams
Determined nighttime snorkeling to be the most effective method for locating juvenile salmon in winter.
Completed annual progress report.
Presentation at BPA review.
1996 Maintained Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek traps.
Pit tagged 1,500 juvenile salmon in both Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River and obtained recapture data from mainstem dams
Conducted summer and winter habitat surveys for juvenile chinook salmon.
Completed annual progress report.
Presentation to Northeast Oregon regional managers at ODFW Research Review.
Presentation at Oregon AFS.
1997 Establish a field office for Wallowa River life history study.
Maintained Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek traps. Deployed two traps in the Wallow River and one in the Lostine River.
Pit tagged 1,500 juvenile salmon in Catherine Creek, the upper Grande Ronde River, and the Lostine and obtained recapture data from mainstem dams.
Conducted summer and winter habitat surveys for juvenile chinook salmon.
Completed annual progress report.
Presentation at CBFWA Fish and Wildlife Program review.


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

Project ID Title Description Umbrella
9403300 Fish Passage Center's smolt monitoring program Trap data will be exchanged with the Lower Grande Ronde study to provide in-river information on migration timing No
8805305 Northeast Oregon Hatcheries Master Plan Provide information on local populations that is crucial for planning, implementation, and evaluation of supplementation in the Grande Ronde basin. No
9402700 Grande Ronde Model Watershed Provide information on habitat utilization and juvenile production that is used to idnetify and prioritize habitat improvement projects. No
9801001 Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program Screw trap abundance will be used to monitor the success of the captive program when juveniles are released. Parr surveys will provide reconnaissance information for juvenile collection. Life history information will be used to evaluate captive program. No
9600800 PATH: Plan for analyzing and testing hypotheses Provide data for life cycle model No
8805301 NEOH Grande Ronde (Nez Perce) Provide information on local populations that is crucial for planning and implementation of supplementation in the Grande Ronde Basin. Provide monitoring for evaluating impacts of this project on naturally reproducing populations No
8805302 NEOH Grande Ronde (CTUIR) Provide information on local populations that is crucial for planning and implementation of supplementation in the Grande Ronde Basin. Provide monitoring for evaluating impacts of this project on naturally reproducing populations No
8810804 STREAMNET Provide information for use in database. No
9405400 Bull Trout Studies in Central and Northeast Oregon Collect bull trout for tagging and provide meristic and recapture data. No
20512 ODFW Grande Ronde River Subbasin Umbrella Yes


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Document the in-basin migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek and the Lostine River tributary populations, including the abundance of migrants, migration timing and duration. a. Collect juvenile spring chinook salmon migrants by operating five rotary screw traps at selected trapping sites. The traps will be operated year round if possible and will only be removed if low flows or ice prevent operations.
1. b. Enumerate all spring chinook salmon collected in traps. Measure the length and weight for 80 migrants collected weekly at each trapping location. Calculate condition factor for these 80 salmon.
1. c. Mark approximately 50 spring chinook salmon migrants collected weekly at each trap. Salmon will receive a mark of water soluble acrylic paint that is applied with a Panjet marking instrument.
1. d. Determine trapping efficiencies for each trap throughout the trapping period using fish marked in Task 1.3.
1. e. Estimate the number of juvenile chinook salmon migrating from rearing areas based on number of chinook salmon collected in the traps, trap efficiencies, and mortality estimates associated with the marking procedure.
1. f. For each trap location, plot estimated number of migrants against time of the year to determine timing and duration of the juvenile migration periods.
1. g. Continuously monitor water temperature using a thermograph and monitor river height daily from a river gage at each trap.
2. Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for fall and spring migrating spring chinook salmon from tributary populations in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek, and the Lostine River. a. Interrogate each chinook salmon collected in the screw traps for a previously implanted PIT tag. Record tag number and measure lengths and weights of all PIT-tagged recaptures.
2. b. PIT-tag approximately 500 fall and spring migrating spring chinook salmon juveniles at rearing area traps that were not previously tagged and create a PIT tag data base for tagged fish. Tag 500 salmon from each tributary population.
2. c. Collect and PIT tag approximately 500 winter resident parr from rearing areas above the upper screw traps. Tag 500 salmon from each tributary population. Create a PIT tag data base for these fish.
2. d. Monitor PIT-tagged migrants at the lower Grande Ronde and Wallowa traps. Measure and record tag number, length and weight information for all PIT-tagged fish. Enter lower trap recovery data on PTAGIS database.
2. e. Obtain detection information for PIT-tagged fish recovered at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.
2. f. Determine mainstem dam detection rates for fall, winter and spring tagged fish from each tributary population.
2. g. Compare detection rates between treatment groups. Estimate overwinter mortality, the success of fall migration strategy, and the relative success of the fall migrant and spring migrant life history strategies for each tributary population.
3. Determine seasonal habitat utilization and preference of juvenile spring chinook salmon in the Lostine River. a. Identify the limits of the summer and winter rearing distribution of salmon juveniles. This task will be accomplished in conjunction with spawning ground surveys.
3. b. Identify and select sites to be sampled within upper rearing areas. Select replicate sites that are representative of all available habitat types (i.e. plunge pool, glide, etc.).
3. c. At each sampling site enumerate spring chinook salmon juveniles using snorkeling observations.
3. d. Record the habitat classification and describe the habitat of each sampling site. The following measurements will be taken: temperature, water velocity, maximum river depth, width at three different points, length, substrate composition, instream habitat
3. e. Estimate surface area of each sampling site (S.A. = Length X mean width) and calculate the density of juvenile salmon per unit area of habitat.
3. f. Determine habitat preference using preference/selectivity indices.
4. Characterize cold- and warm-water areas located in the Grande Ronde River basin and describe the patterns of use by juvenile spring chinook salmon. a. Write report describing thermal refuge use of salmon and steelhead in the Grande Ronde River basin.
5. Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for migrants from four local, natural populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins. a. Collect 500 juvenile salmon from Catherine Creek and the Lostine River and 1,000 juveniles from the Minam and Imnaha rivers in August and September. Locate juveniles by snorkeling and collect fish with seines. Use sanctuary nets to transfer fish.
5. b. PIT tag salmon 60mm FL or greater. Anesthetize salmon with MS222 and manually inject PIT tag with modified hypodermic syringes that are disinfected prior to each use. Fish will be allowed to recover after tagging and released near collection site.
5. c. Incorporate data into ASCII files according to criteria developed by the PIT Tag Steering Committee and submit files to the PIT Tag Information System (PTAGIS) database.
5. d. Import data from collection stations at Lower Granite, Little Goose, and McNary dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Files will be downloaded from PTAGIS and parr-to-smolt survival of the PIT tagged populations will be determined.
5. e. Analyze the results and interpret the analysis.
6. Document the annual migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles from four local, natural populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins. a. Plot the number of PIT tagged fish migrating over time for spring chinook from each population.
6. b. Analyze the data using ANOVA of a distribution analysis and interpret the data.
7. Determine survival to parr stage for spring chinook salmon in two local, natural populations in the Grande Ronde River Basin. a. Use snorkeling observation to determine the summer rearing distribution of parr and the relationship of parr distribution to redd distribution.
7. b. Collect parr using snorkelers to herd the fish into a seine, anesthetize parr, determine length and weight and give appropriate mark. Release fish at or near collection site after they recover from anesthesia.
7. c. Repeat collection survey two to three days later to enumerate recaptures.
7. d. Use mark-recapture methodology to estimate the total abundance of parr in summer.
7. e. Estimate survival by life stage using data collected in Task 9.2 combined with smolt abundance and adult escapement data from an ongoing related study.
8. Investigate the significance of alternative life history strategies of spring chinook salmon in two local populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha river basins. a. Estimate the total abundance of precocious males in late summer and determine what portion of the population exhibits this alternate life history strategy.
8. b. Estimate the abundance of juvenile salmon that remain in freshwater past their second spring and do not mature sexually and determine the portion of the total parr population that exhibits this alternate life history strategy.
8. c. Estimate the number of two year old smolts that out migrate past the mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams.
9. Document patterns of movement for juvenile O.mykiss from tributary populations in Catherine Creek, the upper Grande Ronde, and the Lostine River. Include data on migration timing, duration, and smolt abundance. a. Collect juvenile O. mykiss by operating five rotary screw traps at selected trapping sites. The traps will be operated year round if possible and will only be removed if low flows or ice prevent operations.
9. b. Enumerate all O. mykiss collected in traps. Measure the length and weight of 100 fish weekly at each trapping location. Calculate the condition factor for these 100 fish. Idnetify smolts based on visual examination.
9. c. Mark approximately 50 O. mykiss weekly at each trap. Fish will receive either a paint mark or a PIT tag for identification.
9. d. Determine trap efficiencies for each trap throughout the trapping period.
9. e. Estimate the number of O. mykiss migrating past the trap based on number of fish collected, trap efficiencies, recapture histories, and mortality associated with the marking procedures. Estimate annual smolt abundance for each tributary population.
9. f. For each trap location, plot the estimated number of migrants against time of the year to determine timing and duration of juvenile migration periods.
10. Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for summer steelhead from three tributary populations, Catherine Creek and the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers. a. Interrogate each O. mykiss juvenile collected in the traps for a previously implanted PIT tag. Record tag number and measure lengths and weights of all PIT-tagged recaptures.
10. b. PIT tag approximately 500 migrating steelhead smolts that were not previously tagged and create a PIT tag data base for these fish.
10. c. Monitor PIT-tagged migrants at the lower river traps. Measure and record tag number, length and weight information for all PIT-tagged fish. Enter lower trap recovery data on PTAGIS database.
10. d. Obtain detection information for PIT-tagged fish recovered at Lower Granite, Little Goose. Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day and Bonneville dams.
10. e. Determine mainstem dam detection rates for steelhead smolts from the three tributary populations.
11. Evaluate methods to estimate the proportion of O. mykiss captured during fall trapping that are migrating out of rearing areas and will undertake a smolt migration the following spring. a. PIT tag up to 1,000 juvenile O. mykiss that are collected in each of the three rearing traps in the fall. Create a PIT tag database for these fish.
11. b. Record recaptures of these fall-tagged fish both from in-basin sources and mainstem dam detections.
11. c. Use recapture data and collection efficiences to estimate the minimum number of smolts leaving the tributary populations that miagrated out of upper rearing areas in the fall.
11. d. Investigate the potential of altenative methods including but not limited to, radio tagging, tandem trapping, and genetic characterization of the juvenile O. mykiss population.
12. Begin to describe the population characteristics of the juvenile O. mykiss population in Catherine Creek. a. Identify the limits and distribution of parr using field sampling in combination with recent ODFW survey data.
12. b. Use passive seining techniques to collect parr throughout their distribution.
12. c. Mark parr with a paint mark or similar benign technique. Collect scale samples from 100 fish in each size category collected.
12. d. After several days collect a random sample of parr and use mark-recapture estimations to generate a parr population estimate.
12. e. Read scales to determine parr age and to reconstruct the age structure of O. mykiss parr populaiton.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 10/01/99 09/01/00 Document the in-basin migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek and the Lostine River tributary populations, including the abundance of migrants, migration timing and duration. 10.0%
2 10/01/99 09/01/00 Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for fall and spring migrating spring chinook salmon from tributary populations in the upper Grande Ronde River, Catherine Creek, and the Lostine River. 10.0%
3 10/01/99 09/01/00 Determine seasonal habitat utilization and preference of juvenile spring chinook salmon in the Lostine River. 10.0%
4 10/01/99 09/01/00 Characterize cold- and warm-water areas located in the Grande Ronde River basin and describe the patterns of use by juvenile spring chinook salmon. 5.0%
5 10/01/99 09/01/00 Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for migrants from four local, natural populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins. 5.0%
6 10/01/99 09/01/00 Document the annual migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles from four local, natural populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River basins. 5.0%
7 10/01/99 09/01/00 Determine survival to parr stage for spring chinook salmon in two local, natural populations in the Grande Ronde River Basin. 10.0%
8 10/01/99 09/01/00 Investigate the significance of alternative life history strategies of spring chinook salmon in two local populations in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha river basins. 10.0%
9 10/01/99 09/01/00 Document patterns of movement for juvenile O.mykiss from tributary populations in Catherine Creek, the upper Grande Ronde, and the Lostine River. Include data on migration timing, duration, and smolt abundance. 10.0%
10 10/01/99 09/01/00 Estimate and compare smolt detection rates at mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for summer steelhead from three tributary populations, Catherine Creek and the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers. 10.0%
11 10/01/99 09/01/00 Evaluate methods to estimate the proportion of O. mykiss captured during fall trapping that are migrating out of rearing areas and will undertake a smolt migration the following spring. 5.0%
12 10/01/99 09/01/00 Begin to describe the population characteristics of the juvenile O. mykiss population in Catherine Creek. 10.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2000 Cost
Personnel permanent = 189,865 seasonal = 132,228 $322,093
Fringe 36% for permanents = 68,351 45% for seasonals = 59,503 $127,854
Supplies $ 65,000
Capital Computer printer = 2,500 Truck Canopy = 1,500 $ 4,000
PIT tags 13,000 @ 2.90 each $ 37,700
Travel 100 d @ $90/d =9,000 8 Commercial flights@ 350 = 2,800 $ 11,800
Indirect 35.5% of PS and S&S (526,747) $186,995
Subcontractor Oregon State University $ 42,174
Total Itemized Budget $797,616


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2000 project cost $797,616
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2000 budget request $797,616
FY 2000 forecast from 1999 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2001 2002 2003 2004
All Phases $821,545 $846,191 $871,577 $897,724
Total Outyear Budgets $821,545 $846,191 $871,577 $897,724
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: -Salmon and steelhead in the Grande Ronde River are listed under ESA and thus, this research is regulated by NMFS and is subject to annual permitting. -Field activities on private land are subject to landowner permission.


Section 6. References

Reference Watershed?
Achord, S., et al. 1992. Research related to transportation of juvenile salmonids on the Columbia and Snake Rivers, 1991. Report to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. #DACW68-84-H0034. NMFS, Seattle. No
Bisson, P. A., et al. 1982. A system of naming habitat types in small streams, with examples of habitat utilization by salmonids during low stream flow. p. 62-73. In N. B. Armantrout (ed.) Acquisition and utilization of aquatic habitat inventory info. No
Bryson, D. 1993. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Grande Ronde River Management Plan. Final Report. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR. No
Burck, W. A. 1993. Life history of spring chinook salmon in Lookingglass Creek, Oregon. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Information Report (Fish) 94-1, Portland, OR. No
Keefe, M., D. J. Anderson, R. W. Carmichael, and B. C. Jonasson. 1995. Early life history study of Grande Ronde River basin chinook salmon. Annual Progress Report. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR. No
Lofy, P. T. and M. L. McLean. 1995. Evaluation of reestablishing natural production of spring chinook salmon in Lookingglass Creek, Oregon, using a non-endemic hatchery stock. Lower Snake river Compensation Plan 1994 Annual Report. CTUIR, Pendleton. No
Matthews, G. M.et al. 1990. Evaluation of transportation of juvenile salmonids and related research on the Columbia and Snake rivers, 1989. Report to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, #DACW68-84-H0034, NMFS, Seattle. No
Matthews, G. M., et al. 1992. Evaluation of transportation of juvenile salmonids and related research on the Columbia and Snake rivers, 1990. Report to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, # DACW68-84-H0034, NMFS, Seattle. No
Maule, A. G., J. W. Beeman, R. M. Schrock, and P. V. Harnes. 1994. Assessment of smolt condition for travel time analysis. Annual report. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR. No
Nickelson, T. E., J. D. Rodgers, S. L. Johnson, and M. F. Solazzi. 1992. Seasonal changes in habitat use by juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Oregon coastal streams. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 49:783-789. No
NWPPC (Northwest Power Planning Council). 1992. Strategy for salmon, Volume VII. No
Prentice, E. F., T. A. Flagg, C. S. McCutcheon, D. F. Brastow and D. C. Cross. 1990. Equipment, methods, and an automated data-entry station for PIT-tagging. American Fisheries Society Symposium 7:335-340, 1990. No
ODFW (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife). 1990. Grande Ronde River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR. No
Sankovich, P. M., et al. 1997. Smolt migration characteristics and mainstem Snake and Columbia river detection rates of PIT-tagged Grande Ronde and Imnaha river naturally-produced spring chinook salmon. Annual Report. BPA, Portland,OR. No
Snake River Recovery Team. 1993. Draft Snake River salmon recovery plan recommendations. National Marine Fisheries Service, Portland, OR. No
USACE (United States Army Corps of Engineers). 1975. Lower Snake River Fish and Wildlife Compensation Plan Special Report. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla, WA. No
USFS (United States Forest Service) and six co-author agencies. 1992. Upper Grande Ronde River Anadromous Fish Habitat Restoration and Monitoring Plan. U. S. Forest Service, Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker, OR. No


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

ISRP Preliminary Review , ISRP 99-2 Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Jun 15, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Recommendation: Fund. The project has high programmatic value and the proposal is suitable for a multi-year review cycle; ISRP will not need to review it next year.

Comments: The panel agreed that this is an excellent proposal that provides a comprehensive evaluation of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead life-history variation in relation to habitat characteristics such as substrate composition, stream depth, water temperature, and discharge. Comparison of techniques for estimating abundance of summer steelhead smolts is included in the project. One value is that they will be able to monitor the effects of hatchery releases on native populations. The data could be extrapolated for more general use. As hatcheries are about to be added in this area, this proposal will provide extremely valuable baseline and continuing data for evaluation and understanding of the experiments and mitigation efforts. Examples of adaptive feedback to management are also a strong point of the project.

The panel had several specific comments and questions: Why is Objective 8 considered "descriptive" and not subject to hypothesis testing? The PIs should justify how much more they need to know and these needs should justify the project's expense. Why is the habitat work needed, since they say they have already determined that juvenile salmon are most abundant in pools. It would seem that the habitat of the various rivers should be protected and restored in light of the dire situation of the salmon. Since apparently much field work has been done, the data should be analyzed and a report written.


CBFWA Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
2000
$700,000
Comment:

CBFWA: Nonwatershed Technical Group Comments Recommendation:
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Criteria all: Met? Yes -

CBFWA: Subregional Team Comments Recommendation:
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Objective 4 reduced, drop Objective 8. Low priority objectives were reduced or eliminated. General reduction in the scope of the project.

NWPPC Funding Recommendation , NWPPC 2000-6 Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Mar 1, 2000
2000
$700,000
Comment:
[Decision made in 9-22-99 Council Meeting]

NW Power and Conservation Council's FY 2006 Project Funding Review Funding category:
expense
Date:
May 2005
FY05 NPCC Start of Year:
$949,504
FY06 NPCC Staff Preliminary:
$949,504
FY06 NPCC July Draft Start of Year:
$949,504
Sponsor (ODFW) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

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