Return to Proposal Finder FY 2000 Proposal 199604000

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Objectives, tasks and schedules
Section 5. Budget
Section 6. References
Section 7. Abstract

Reviews and Recommendations
Title Type File Size File Date


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Evaluate the Feasibility and Risks of Coho Reintroduction in Mid-Columbia
BPA Project Proposal Number 199604000
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Yakama Indian Nation
Business acronym (if appropriate) YN
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Lynn Hatcher
Mailing Address P.O. Box 151
City, State, Zip Toppenish, WA 98948
Phone 5098656262
Fax 5098656293
E-mail lynn@yakama.com
 
Manager of program authorizing this project
 
Review Cycle FY 2000
Province Columbia Cascade
Subbasin Wenatchee
 
Short Description Determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning coho population within the mid-Columbia tributaries, while keeping adverse ecological impacts on other salmonid species of concern within acceptable limits.
Target Species Coho


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


NPPC Program Measure Number(s) which this project addresses: 7.1H, 7.4A, 7.4O, 7.4F
FWS/NMFS Biological Opinion Number(s) which this project addresses: Section 7 Consultation on 1998 Coho Releases in Methow River Basin (no # assigned)
Other Planning Document References Wy Kan Ush Me Kush Wit, Spirit of the Salmon


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

Year Accomplishment
1992 Yakima Basin - Evaluation of coho predation on fall chinook.
1997 Yakima Basin - Evaluation of coho predation on fall chinook.
1997 Yakima Basin - Evaluation of coho predation on fall chinook (CONTINUED).
1998 Yakima Basin - Evaluation of coho predation on fall chinook.
1998 Yakima Basin - Evaluation of coho predation on spring chinook.
1998 Yakima Basin - Evaluation of coho competition with rainbow/steelhead and cutthroat trout in Little Naches River and tributaries.
1998 Yakima Basin - Determination of Little Naches River mainstem coho distribution.
1996 Methow Basin - Evaluation of vulnerability associated with hatchery coho smolts upon emergent summer chinook fry.
1997 Methow Basin - Define the “window”of summer chinook fry vulnerability.
1997 Methow Basin - Observe the macrohabitat utilization between hatchery coho smolts and other juvenile salmonids (primarily summer chinook fry).
1997 Methow Basin - Macrohabitat habitat utilization (CONTINUED).
1998 Methow Basin - Monitor hatchery coho residualism.
1998 Methow Basin - Monitor hatchery coho residualism (CONTINUED).
1998 Methow Basin - Evaluation of spring chinook fry presence/absence.
1998 Methow Basin - Evaluation of spring chinook fry presence/absence (CONTINUED).


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

Project ID Title Description Umbrella
9603302 Yakima River Coho Restoration 9604000 and 9603302 have similar goals. Certain study objectives are non-basin specific. Therefore, in the experimental design and monitoring/evaluation plan several of the generic questions will be developed and implemented in the Yakima River Basin. No


Section 4. Objectives, Tasks and Schedules

Objectives and Tasks

Objective Task
1. Wenatchee Basin - Measure smolt-to-smolt survival rates for hatchery coho released in the Wenatchee Basin. a. A portion of each release group (approximately 7K fish per treatment/release group) will be PIT tagged to evaluate absolute smolt-to-smolt survival to the lower Columbia River.
2. Wenatchee Basin - Measure smolt-to-adult survival rates for hatchery coho released in the Wenatchee Basin. a. Smolt-to-adult survival will be monitored based on Rock Island minus Rocky Reach dam counts and/or Tumwater Dam adult fish passage counts.
3. Wenatchee Basin - Determine the geographic spawning areas of returning and naturally produced coho spawners. a. Boat/foot surveys will be conducted initially in stream reaches close to the smolt release sites, and will branch out from these release sites if the appropriate numbers of redds are not located.
4. Wenatchee Basin - Evaluate the potential for direct predation of hatchery coho smolts on salmonid fry. a. Identify the highest density spring chinook of redds in Nason Creek. A direct predation experiment conducted at this location would represent a worst-case predation scenario. Apply rates of coho predation on spring chinook
4. CONTINUED a. observed in the upper Yakima (1998 study) in order to determine the number of coho smolts to release in Nason Creek. Operate a rotary trap during the coho smolt outmigration period to collect stomach samples.
5. Wenatchee Basin - Monitor the long-term productivity of the coho supplementation program. a. Stock productivity will be expressed as the number of returning hatchery adults (F2) resulting from the initial number of adults (including jacks) spawned for a specific broodyear (F1).
5. CONTINUED a. The number of returning hatchery adults will be estimated based on the mainstem Columbia River counts between Rock Island and Rocky Reach, and Tumwater and/or the Chiwawa adult weir
6. Methow Basin - Measure smolt-to-smolt survival rates for hatchery coho released in the Methow Basin. a. See the Wenatchee discussion. The only differences in experimental design with respect to smolt-at-release to smolt-to-the-lower Columbia River survival are that a larger number of fish (8K) will be PIT-tagged to account for the lower passage
6. CONTINUED a. (2 more dams).
7. Methow Basin - Measure smolt-to-adult survival rates for hatchery coho released. a. Smolt-to-adult survival will be calculated based on the Wells Dam passage counts.
8. Methow Basin - Determine the geographic spawning areas of returning and naturally produced coho spawners. a. The location and date of each redd found will be recorded. In addition, physical data will be recorded from a random sample of redds in each subbasin (i.e., Methow, Twisp and Chewuch basins).
9. Methow Basin - Determine the extent of hatchery coho residualism. a. If residualization is a serious problem, it most likely will be detectable near the points of smolt release. Snorkel survey reaches will be established between one river mile upstream and three river miles downstream of the release point.
10. Methow Basin - Monitor the long-term productivity of the coho supplementation program. a. Productivity will be expressed as the number of returning hatchery adults (F2) resulting from the initial number of adults (including jacks) spawned for a specific broodyear (F1). The number of returning hatchery adults will be estimated at Wells Dam.
11. Wenatchee/Methow basins - Develop facilities to meet the objectives of the experimental program. a. Modify/construct experimental production facilities which include those for adult capture, holding and spawning, egg incubation, juvenile rearing, acclimation and release, and monitoring.
12. Wenatchee/Methow basins - Operation of experimental facilities. a. Operate/maintain experimental facilities associated wth the task listed in Objective 11 directly above.
13. Wenatchee/Entiat/Methow basins - Determine whether it is feasible to establish a viable localized broodstock for hatchery supplementation in the mid-Columbia. a. Release coho smolts from mid-Columbia locations and capture returning adults at various established traps with the intent of egg banking at an existing, yet to be determined mid-Columbia facility.
14. Wenatchee/Entiat/Methow basins - Evaluate the long-term changes in the genetic and life history profiles of a non-native stock of hatchery coho introduced to mid-Columbia River tributaries. a. Monitor divergence between lower Columbia River hatchery stocks (LCRHS) and broodstock used by the YIN to obtain information on traits of adaptive value within the mid-Columbia basin.
15. Wenatchee/Entiat/Methow basins - NEPA. Develop an Environmental Impact Statement on the long-term restoration phase of the project. a. Follow the policies and guidelines as defined in the National Environmental Policy Act.

Objective Schedules and Costs

Objective Start Date End Date Measurable Biological Objectives Milestone FY 2000 Cost %
1 04/01/99 12/01/07 Wenatchee Basin - Smolt to smolt survival X 7.0%
2 09/01/00 12/01/20 Wenatchee Basin - Smolt to adult survival X 4.0%
3 09/01/00 12/01/20 Wenatchee Basin - Spawning ground counts X 4.0%
4 09/01/00 12/01/02 Wenatchee Basin-Direct predation on salmonids X 17.0%
5 09/01/00 12/01/20 Wenatchee Basin - long-term productivity X 2.0%
6 04/01/98 12/01/07 Methow Basin - Smolt to smolt survival X 5.0%
7 04/01/98 12/01/20 Methow Basin - Smolt to adult survival X 2.0%
8 04/01/99 12/01/20 Methow Basin - Spawning ground counts X 2.0%
9 04/01/98 04/01/01 Methow Basin - Coho residualism X 2.0%
10 04/01/99 12/01/20 Methow Basin - Long-term productivity X 2.0%
11 06/01/97 12/01/07 Wenatchee/Methow ba. Facility development X 16.0%
12 09/01/97 12/01/20 Wenatchee/Methow ba. Facility Oper./Main. X 18.0%
13 09/01/99 12/01/15 Wen./Entiat/Methow ba. Broodstock develop. X 8.0%
14 04/01/99 12/01/20 Wenatchee/Methow ba. Genetic monitoring X 3.0%
15 06/01/99 12/01/01 Wen./Entiat/Methow ba. NEPA X 6.0%


Section 5. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2000 Cost
Personnel $212,000
Fringe 26% $ 55,000
Supplies $ 25,000
Operating $190,000
Capital $ 75,000
NEPA EIS $ 50,000
Construction $ 30,000
PIT tags 20,000 $ 58,000
Travel $ 25,000
Indirect 24% $178,000
Other Vehicle, Insurance $ 20,000
Subcontractor Egg banking USFWS $ 65,000
Subcontractor WDFW, USFS, Colville Tribe $200,000
Subcontractor Genetic monitoring $ 25,000
Subcontractor Acclimation construction $175,000
Subcontractor Fish health USFWS $ 20,000
Subcontractor Acclimation design $ 15,000
Total Itemized Budget $1,418,000


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2000 project cost $1,418,000
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2000 budget request $1,418,000
FY 2000 forecast from 1999 $ 0
% change from forecast 0.0%


Reason for change in estimated budget

Not applicable


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2001 2002 2003 2004
All Phases $1,650,000 $2,550,000 $2,850,000 $1,850,000
Total Outyear Budgets $1,650,000 $2,550,000 $2,850,000 $1,850,000
 

Other Budget Explanation

Schedule Constraints: Resolving the objectives of the project depends on efficient collection of mostly field data. Unforeseen logistical problems caused by watershed environmental conditions, like hydrology and it effects on trapping, may cause schedule changes.


Section 6. References

Reference Watershed?
Allee, J.B. 1974. Spatial requirements and behavioral interactions of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). Doctoral dissertation, University of Washington, Seattle. No
Allee, B.A. 1981. The role of interspecific competition in the distribution of salmonids in streams. Pages 111-122 in E.L. Brannon and E.O. Salo, editors. Proceedings of the salmon and trout migratory behavior symposium. Univ. of Wash. Press, Seattle. No
Bisson, P.A., K. Sullivan, and J.L. Nielsen. 1988. Channel hydraulics, habitat use, and body form of juvenile coho salmon, steelhead and cutthroat trout in streams. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 117:262-273. No
Bugert. R.M. and T.C. Bjornn. 1991. Habitat use by steelhead and coho salmon and their responses to predators and cover in laboratory streams. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 120:486-493. No
Bugert. R.M., T.C. Bjornn, and W.R. Meehan. 1991. Summer habitat use by young salmonids and their response to cover and predators in a small southeast Alaska stream. Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 120:474-485. No
Burns, J.W. 1971. The carrying capacity for juvenile salmonids in some northern California streams. California Fish and Game 57(1):44-57. No
Bustard, D.R., and D.W. Narver. 1975a. Aspects of the winter ecology of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 32:667-680. No
Bustard, D.R., and D.W. Narver. 1975b. Preference of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and cutthroat trout (Salmo clarkii) relative to simulated alteration of winter habitat. J. Fish. Res. Bd. Canada 32:681-687. No
Cailliet, G.M., M. S. Love, and A.W. Ebeling. 1986. Fishes - A field and laboratory manual on their structure, identification and natural history. Waveland Press, Incorporated. Prospect Heights, Illinois. No
Chapman, D.W. 1962. Aggressive behavior of juvenile coho salmon as a cause of emigration. J. Fish. Res. Bd. Canada, 19: 1047-1080. No
Chapman, D.W. 1965. Net production of juvenile coho salmon in three Oregon streams. Trans. Amer. Fish. Soc. 94: 40-52. No
Chapman, D.W. 1986. Salmon and steelhead abundance in the Columbia River in the nineteenth century. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 115:662-670. No
Chapman, D.W., A.Giorgi, M. Hill, A. Maule. S. McCutcheon, D. Park, W. Platts, K. Pratt, J. Seeb, L. Seeb, and F. Utter. 1991. Status of Snake River chinook salmon. Prepared for the PNUCC Committee. Don Chapman Consultants, Inc. Boise, Idaho. No
Craig, J.A. and R.L. Hacker. 1940. The history and development of the fisheries of the Columbia River. Bulletin XLIX, Bureau of Fisheries, Washington D.C. No
CRITFC (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission). 1995. Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit: Spirit of the Salmon. The Columbia River Anadromous Fish Plan of the Nez Perce, Umatilla, Warm Springs, and Yakama Tribes. No
Eggers, D.M. 1979. Comment on some recent methods for estimating food consumption by fish. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 36:1018-1019. No
Fast, D.E., J.D. Hubble, and B.D. Watson. 1986. Yakima River spring chinook enhancement study. Project Annual Report. Bonneville Power Administration. Project 82-16. No
Fausch, K.D. 1992. Experimental analysis of microhabitat selection by juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and coho salmon (O. kisutch) in a British Columbia Stream. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 50:1198-1207. No
Foerster, R.E., and W.E. Ricker. 1953. The coho salmon of Cultus Lake and Sweltzer Creek. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 10:293-319. No
Frasier, F.J. 1969. Population density effects on survival and growth of juvenile coho salmon and steelhead trout in experimental stream channels. Pages 253-265 in T.G. Northcote, editor. Symposium on salmon and trout in streams. H.R. MacMillan No
Frasier (1969) continued: Lectures in Fisheries, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. No
Fulton, L.A. 1970. Spawning areas and abundance of steelhead trout and coho, sockeye, and chum salmon in the Columbia River Basin-past and present. United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Special scientific report-Fisheries Number 618. Washington, DC No
Gibson, R.J. 1981. Behavioral interactions between coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) at the juvenile stages. No
Gibson (1981) continued: Can. Tech. Rep. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 1029. 116pp. No
Glova, G.J. 1984. Management implications of the distribution and diet of sympatric populations of juvenile coho salmon and coastal cutthroat trout in small streams in British Columbia, Canada. Progressive Fish Culturist 46:269-277. No
Glova, G.J. 1986. Interaction for food and space between experimental populations of juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and coastal cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) in a laboratory stream. Hydrobiologia 131:155-168. No
Glova, G.J. 1987. Comparison of allopatric cutthroat trout stocks with those sympatric with coho salmon and sculpins in small streams. Environmental Biology of Fishes 20(4):275-284. No
Groot, C. and L. Margolis. 1991. Pacific salmon life histories. UBC Press, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. No
Hansel, H.C., S.D. Duke, P.T. Lofy, and G.A. Gray. 1988. Use of diagnostic bones to identify and estimate original lengths of ingested prey fishes. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 117:55-62. No
Hard, J.J., R.P. Jones Jr., M.R. Delarm, and R.S. Waples. 1992. Pacific salmon and artificial propagation under the endangered species act. NMFS, Technical Memorandum NMFS-NWFSC-2, October 1992. No
Hartman, G.F. 1965. The role of behavior in the ecology and interaction of underyearling coho salmon and steelhead trout. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 22:1035-1081. No
He, E., W.A. Wurtsbaugh. 1993. An empirical model of gastric evacuation rates for fish and an analysis of digestion in piscivorous brown trout. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 122:717-730. No
Hunter, J.G. 1959. Survival and production of pink and chum salmon in a coastal stream. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 16:835-886. No
Johnston, J.M. 1967. Food and feeding habits of juvenile coho salmon and steelhead trout in Worthy Creek, Washington. Master of Science Thesis, University of Washington, Seattle. No
Lestelle, L.C., G.R. Blair, and S.A. Chitwood. 1993. Approaches to supplementing coho salmon in the Queets River, Washington. Pages 104-119 in L. Berg and P.W. Delaney, eds. Proceedings of the Coho Workshop, Nanaimo, B.C., May 26-28, 1992. No
Lister, D.B., and H.S. Genoe. 1970. Stream habitat utilization by cohabiting underyearlings of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon in the Big Qualicum River, British Columbia. J. Fish. Res. Bd. Can. 27:1215-1224. No
McHenry, M., R. Mosely and S. Chitwood. 1989. Coho salmon fry supplementation in coastal Washington streams: Progress Report I. Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, Washington Department of Fisheries, and Quinalt Indian Nation. June 1989. No
Miller, W.H. 1990. Analysis of salmon and steelhead supplementation. United States Department of Energy. Bonneville Power Administration Project Number 88-100. Portland, Oregon. No
Mullan, J.W. 1983. Overview of Artificial and Natural Propagation of Coho Salmon (Onchorhynchus kisutch) on the Mid-Columbia River. Fisheries Assistance Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Leavenworth, Washington. December 1983. No
Nilsson, N.A. 1966. Interactive segregation between fishes. In: The biological basis of freshwater fish production. S.D. Gerking editor. Blackwell Scientific Publishing, Oxford, Great Britain. No
NMFS (National Marine Fisheries Service). 1991. Status review for lower Columbia River coho salmon. National Marine Fisheries Service. Seattle, WA. June 1991. No
NMFS. 1995. Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Three Contiguous ESUs of Coho Salmon Ranging from Oregon through Central California. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Federal Registe No
NPPC (Northwest Power Planning Council). 1994. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. NPPC 94-55, Portland, OR. No
Parties to U.S. v. Oregon. 1987. Columbia River Fish Management Plan. Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. Portland, OR. No
Reeves, G.H., F.H. Everest and T.E. Nickelson. 1989. Identification of physical habitats limiting the production of coho salmon in western Oregon and Washington. U.S. Forest Service, Pac. N.W. Res. Sta., Gen. Tech. Report PNW-GTR-245. Corvallis, OR. No
Reiser, D.W. and T.C. Bjornn. 1979. Habitat requirements of anadromous salmonids. U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. General Technical Report PNW-96. October 1979. No
Ricker, W.E. 1941. The consumption of young sockeye salmon by predaceous fish. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada 5:104-105. No
Ruggerone, G.T. 1989. Gastric evacuation rates and daily ration of piscivorous coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum. Journal of Fisheries Biology 34:451-463. No
Ruggerone, G.T., and D.E. Rogers. 1992. Predation on sockeye salmon fry by juvenile coho salmon in the Chignik Lakes, Alaska: Implications for salmon management. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 12:87-102. No
Spaulding, J.S., T.W. Hillman, J.S. Griffith. 1989. Habitat use, growth, and movement of chinook salmon and steelhead in response to introduced coho salmon. Pages 156-208 in Don Chapman Consultants, Incorporated. Summer and winter ecology of juvenile No
Spaulding (continued): chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Wenatchee River, Washington. Chelan County Public Utility District, Washington. No
Stein, R.A., P.E. Reimers, and J.D. Hall. 1972. Social interaction between juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and fall chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in Sixes River, Oregon. J. Fish. Res. Bd. Can. 29:1737-1748. No
Steward, C.R. and T.C. Bjornn. 1990. Supplementation of salmon and steelhead stocks with hatchery fish: A synthesis of published literature. In W.H. Miller (editor), Analysis of salmon and steelhead supplementation, Part 2. Report to Bonneville No
Steward (continued): Power Administration (Proj. 88-100), Portland OR. No
Swain, D. P., and B.E. Riddell. 1990. Variation in agonistic behavior between newly emerged juveniles from hatchery and wild populations of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 47: 566-571. No
Taylor, E.B. 1991. Behavioural interaction and habitat use in juvenile chinook, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and coho, O. kisutch, salmon. Animal Behaviour 42:729-744. No
Taylor, W.R., and G.C. Van Dyke. 1985. Revised procedures for staining and clearing small fishes and other vertebrates for bone and cartilage study. Cybium 9:107-119. No
Thompson, R.B. 1966. Effects of predator avoidance conditioning on the post-survival rate of artificially propagated salmon. Ph.D. dissertation submitted to University of Washington, Seattle. No
Tripp, D., and P. McCart. 1983. Effects of different coho stocking strategies on coho and cutthroat trout production in isolated headwater streams. Canadian Technical Report of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 1212:175 p. No
Van Deventer, J.S., and W.S. Platts. 1983. Sampling and estimating fish populations from streams. Transactions North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference 48:349-354. No
USDOE-BPA (U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration). 1996. Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0169). Portland, OR. No
YIN (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Indian Nation). 1998. Mid-Columbia Coho Study Plan. Submitted to Bonneville Power Administration for scoping of project EIS. November, 1998. No
YIN (Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Indian Nation). 1998. Yakima Coho Salmon, Draft Project Status Report. No


Section 7. Abstract

Abstract


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

ISRP Preliminary Review , ISRP 99-2 Recommendation:
Fund in part
Date:
Jun 15, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Recommendation: Fund in part. Recommend full funding for objectives 6-10; partial funding for objectives 11-15 based on costs related to implementation of objectives 6-10 in the Methow. Do not fund objectives 1-5 until coho reintroduction in the Methow has shown success in terms of naturally reproducing fish.

Comments: This was a very complex and detailed proposal involving a large number of tasks. They did a good job of recognizing the problems and risks associated with their proposed activities. They did an excellent job of justifying the efforts and it would take too much space to review them in detail. The 0.001% return rate of adult coho to Wells Dam is definitely a cause for concern and is worthy of further investigation, especially in light of the relative success at Yakima. It is not likely that they will be able to develop a naturally producing run without first addressing the reasons for coho extirpation from the area. Feasibility would be better, and more cost effectively, determined by first seeing if coho reintroduction would work in one of the tributaries rather than in multiple subbasins. The Methow, as proposed, would be a good tributary to test the feasibility.


CBFWA Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
2000
$100,000
Comment:

CBFWA: Nonwatershed Technical Group Comments Recommendation:
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Technical Criteria 1: Met? NA -

Programmatic Criteria 2: Met? yes -

Milestone Criteria 3: Met? yes -

Resource Criteria 4: Met? yes -


CBFWA: Subregional Team Comments Recommendation:
Date:
Aug 20, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
This is a very worthwhile project but the costs seem excessive at this point. We recommend funding for FY00 at the same level as FY99. Based on the outcome of joint discussions between the mid Columbia managers, the work plan should be revised. There appears to be staff members listed for funding on additional projects (i.e. research manager in this proposal also identified in project #9506325 listed for 12 mo of support as a fisheries biologist, project manager in this proposal is identified as the enhancement manager position in project #9701325 for 12 mo of support). Project sponsor has reviewed the proposal and agreed to a reduced funding level of $100,000.

ISRP Final Review , ISRP 99-4 Recommendation:
Fund in part
Date:
Oct 29, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
Fund in part to continue monitoring in the Methow River Basin. Apparently they are abandoning efforts in the Methow River Basin and pursuing reintroduction in the Wenatchee River Basin. They need to develop a proposal with better justification for that effort.

Even though returns to the Methow River Basin have been low, the study of coho reintroduction feasibility should be continued there until a complete, comprehensive justification for switching the focus to the Wenatchee River Basin has been completed. This is too important a decision to change sub-basins without development of a detailed study plan and testable hypotheses beforehand.


NWPPC Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund in part
Date:
Nov 8, 1999
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:

NWPPC Funding Recommendation , NWPPC 2000-6 Recommendation:
Fund in part
Date:
Mar 1, 2000
[There are no budget numbers associated with this review.]
Comment:
(7). Evaluate the Feasibility and Risks of Coho Reintroduction in Mid-Columbia; YIN; Project ID # 9604000; CBFWA 00 Rec. $100,000

Description/Background: Determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning coho population within the mid-Columbia tributaries, while keeping adverse ecological impacts on other salmonid species of concern within acceptable limits.

Final ISRP Evaluation: Fund in part to continue monitoring in the Methow River Basin. The study of coho reintroduction feasibility should be continued in the Methow until a complete, comprehensive justification for switching the focus to the Wenatchee River Basin has been completed. Changing subbasins is too important a decision without the development of a detailed study plan and testable hypotheses.

Sponsor's Policy Response: No written response submitted.

Council Recommendation: Fund in part. Withhold full funding for the project until: 1) a detailed written report on the Methow coho reintroduction project is submitted. This report will describe the background, methods, data collected, discussion and analysis of results, and problems encountered. Also included will be a policy and scientific rationale for the decision to switch the emphasis of the reintroduction project to the Wenatchee subbasin. 2) Complete the 3- step review process for the proposed coho reintroduction project in the Wenatchee subbasin. With the review, the project sponsors will submit a detailed study plan describing the proposed work. A combined step process may be appropriate to help expedite the process. Provide interim funding to carry out the three-step review (i.e. staff analysis of monitoring results, short and long-term production plans, etc.). Also provide sufficient funding through April 30, 2000 to cover all fish rearing costs and associated project costs, including needed acclimation site development, to keep the coho reintroduction project on schedule for Fiscal Year 2000. Appropriate interim funding levels will be determined at a later time working with BPA and the project sponsors. Full funding for the balance of Fiscal Year 2000 (including the Fiscal Year 2000 proposed funding of $100,000) will be contingent on three-step review process and final Council recommendation.


NWPPC Funding Recommendation , NWPPC 2000-6 Recommendation:
Fund in Part
Date:
Mar 1, 2000
2000
$100,000
Comment:
[Decision made in 12-7-99 Council Meeting]; Fund in n part: Methow and Step-3

NW Power and Conservation Council's FY 2006 Project Funding Review Funding category:
expense
Date:
May 2005
FY05 NPCC Start of Year:
$2,288,859
FY06 NPCC Staff Preliminary:
$2,288,859
FY06 NPCC July Draft Start of Year:
$2,288,859
Sponsor (Confederated Tribes And Bands Of The Yakama Indian Nation) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

Sponsor (Confederated Tribes And Bands Of The Yakama Indian Nation) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

Sponsor (Confederated Tribes And Bands Of The Yakama Indian Nation) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

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