Return to Proposal Finder FY 2001 Ongoing Proposal 199000500

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Budgets for planning/design phase
Section 5. Budgets for construction/implementation phase
Section 6. Budgets for operations/maintenance phase
Section 7. Budgets for monitoring/evaluation phase
Section 8. Budget Summary

Reviews and Recommendations
No documents associated with this request


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation
BPA Project Proposal Number 199000500
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Business acronym (if appropriate) ODFW
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Richard W. Carmichael
Mailing Address 211 Inlow Hall
City, State, Zip La Grande, OR , 97850
Phone 5419623777
Fax 5419623067
E-mail rcarmich@eou.edu
 
Manager of program authorizing this project Richard W. Carmichael
 
Review Cycle FY 2001 Ongoing
Province Columbia Plateau
Subbasin Umatilla
 
Short Description Evaluate juvenile rearing, marking, tagging, adult survival, stock life history, fish health, mass marking, straying, sport fishing and catch contribution for salmon and steelhead reared in oxygen supplemented and standard raceways at Umatilla Hatchery.
Target Species


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


Biological Outcomes of this project: The biological outcome for this project is to achieve the following goals for adult returns to the Umatilla River: spring chinook salmon-11,0000; fall chinook salmon-21,000, and steelhead-9,670. Biological outcomes as part of the monitoring and evaluation project include improving the health, performance, and survival of hatchery produced fish. Specific outcomes include improving juvenile survival to Columbia River dams, achieving smolt-to-adult survivals of 0.3% for subyearling fall chinook salmon, 0.75% for yearling chinook salmon, and 2.7% for steelhead, improving escapement to the Umatilla River and reducing straying or the effects of straying in non-targeted basins, improving the contribution of hatchery fish to commercial and sport fisheries, and improving the health of broodstock and juveniles.
Biological Data: Data on hatchery rearing, including water quality, egg take, hatching success, length, weight, condition factor, descaling, smolt development, and tag detections of PIT-tagged fish is available to assess juvenile performance. Adult data, including smolt-to-adult survival estimates, performance of different rearing strategies, life history statistics, catch contribution, and straying evaluations are available to measure adult performance. Catch statistics, including angler hours, number caught and harvested, and catch rates are available to assess contributions to the sport fishery. Cost evaluations are available to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of each rearing strategy.


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

Year Accomplishment
1992 A study to evaluate rearing chinook salmon and steelhead in standard and oxygen supplemented raceways was initiated.
1992 Hatchery monitoring of steelhead revealed severe caudal fin erosion and led to a reduction in rearing densities.
1992 Fish health monitoring and evaluation began in the fall of 1991. This was the beginning of systematic documentation for pathogens and disease in the new Umatilla Hatcheries Oregon and Michigan raceways.
1993 Body tagging was eliminated from the tagging and marking program because it was found to be too costly and time consuming to be useful as a mass mark..
1993 Determined that subyearling spring chinook had a more severe level of BKD than fall release group and some reduction in survival may be anticipated.
1993 A sensitivity comparison was made between the direct fluorescent antibody test (DFAT) and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Rs. At subclinical infection levels the DFAT was found to be an unreliable indicator of infection.
1994 More than 2.4 million fall chinook salmon were successfully marked with blank-wire tags to improve the detection of strays at Snake River dams.
1994 Releases of subyearling spring chinook salmon were eliminated based on juvenile rearing evaluations. Growth and juvenile performance were significantly less than expected.
1994 There were significantly higher moralities in Michigan raceways over that in Oregon raceways for the fall release fish, however no differences in mortality rates were found between upper, middle and lower Michigan raceways.
1995 Measurements of ATPase showed that smolts reared in standard and high density raceways developed at similar rates, but data obtained did not provide additional information on the optimum release date.
1995 Bacterial kidney disease was a significant infectious disease in juvenile spring chinook salmon reared at Umatilla Hatchery. This was a direct correlation to the severity of infection in the female broodstock.
1995 There was no convincing evidence for horizontal transmission of Rs between first pass and re-use water raceways at Umatilla Hatchery
1996 We recommended continued production of steelhead in O2-supplemented raceways. We estimated 40% greater production per gallon of water.
1996 We estimated angler effort of more than 2900 h and the quota of 206 spring chinook salmon was reached for the 1996 fishery.
1996 Efforts began in 1996 to collect sufficient numbers of samples for ELISA from marked returning adults to make assessments of how rearing strategy might be affecting BKD and survival to adulthood.
1997 A study to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon at three densities was initiated. Growth and condition were similar for fish from all raceways.
1997 We determined that wire tagging all fall chinook salmon should continue. Only 5 of 50 Umatilla fish that arrived at Lower Granite Dam escaped. Because wire-tagged fish were removed, we recommended elimination of the ventral fin clip.
1997 We recommended that steelhead straying into the Umatilla basin should be addressed. More than 10% of returning adults were hatchery strays. As a result, tags from broodstock were examined prior to spawning.
1997 Adult spring chinook salmon reared as juveniles at Bonneville and Umatilla Hatcheries and spawned at South Fork Walla Walla Adult Facility exhibited low or negative levels of Rs antigen.
1998 We recommended earlier release of late-release steelhead. Survival of early-release groups averaged 0.83% compared to 0.13% for late group.
1998 PIT-tagging was initiated as monitoring at John Day dam came online. Initial results suggested similar performance of fish reared at three densities, with larger fish performing best.
1998 Pattern has become clearer in this Umatilla program that when chinook broodstocks are used with known clinical BKD females, the progeny either have low grade BKD loss or increased loss due to BKD.
1999 Radio-telemetry monitoring of steelhead showed poor outmigration performance of groups released in May and management changes to improve survival were recommended.


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Budget for Planning and Design Phase

Task-based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Planning and Design Phase

n/a or no information


Section 5. Budget for Construction and Implementation Phase

Task-based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Construction and Implementation Phase

n/a or no information


Section 6. Budget for Operations and Maintenance Phase

Task-based Budget

Objective Task Duration in FYs Estimated 2001 cost Subcontractor
2. Rear subyearling fall chinook salmon at three densities in MI raceways. d. Blank-wire tag 2.2 million fall chinook salmon to identify and manage strays into the Snake River as agreed under Section 7, ESA permit. 1 $193,311  


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Operations and Maintenance Phase

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2002 FY 2003
$211,236 $217,573 $199,110 $205,084


Section 7. Budget for Monitoring and Evaluation Phase

Task-based Budget

Objective Task Duration in FYs Estimated 2001 cost Subcontractor
1 Determine and compare smolt-to-adult survival, life history characteristics, and cost effectiveness of subyearling fall chinook salmon reared in MI and OR raceways. a. Recover CWT data from agencies monitoring all fisheries, Columbia River sport, Tribal, commercial fisheries, hatchery returns, and the Umatilla River fishery. 1 $ 4,463  
1 b. Recover and decode tags from marked adults returning to the Umatilla River. Determine age, length, sex ratios, Umatilla River return, total exploitation, and total survival. 1 $ 4,463  
1 c. Review UFH budget summaries and rearing records and compare cost effectiveness measures. 1 $ 4,464  
2 Determine and compare rearing performance, smolt condition, juvenile migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, life history characteristics, and cost effectiveness of subyearling fall chinook salmon reared at three densities in MI raceways. a. Sample fish monthly, prior to transfer and prior to release to determine mean length, weight, condition factor, and/or feed conversion, smolt status and descaling. 4 $ 6,540  
2 b. PIT-tag fish from each raceway, release tagged groups, and submit release reports. Recover PIT-tag data and compare relative survival and duration to John Day and Bonneville dams. 4 $ 14,400  
2 c. Coded-wire tag fish in each raceway, determine tag retention, and submit tag reports. Recover data from agencies monitoring fisheries, determine life history and survival data. Determine and compare cost effectiveness. 4 $ 59,400  
3 Determine and compare effects of release size on smolt condition and juvenile migration performance of subyearling fall chinook salmon. a. PIT-tag fish groups retained for extended rearing, release tagged groups, and submit release reports. Recover data and compare relative survival and duration to John Day Dam and Bonneville Dam 2 $ 4,463  
3 b. Collect sample fish from production group and from extended rearing group at bi-weekly intervals. Collect plasma samples for Thyroxin, freeze, and send for analysis.. 2 $ 4,463  
3 c. Summarize data and compare mean measurements for all groups by sampling date. 2 $ 4,463  
4. Determine rearing performance, smolt condition, juvenile migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, life history characteristics, and cost effectiveness of yearling fall chinook salmon reared in MI and OR raceways at UFH and Bonneville Hatchery. a. Sample prior to transfer and prior to release to determine mean length, weight, condition factor, and/or feed conversion, smolt status and descaling./ 3 $ 6,695  
4 b. PIT-tag fish from each raceway, release tagged groups, and submit release reports. Recover PIT-tag data and compare relative survival and duration to John Day and Bonneville dams. 3 $ 6,695  
4 c. Wire tag two groups at Bonneville Hatchery, determine tag retention, and submit tag reports. Recover data from agencies monitoring fisheries, determine life history and survival data. Determine and compare cost effectiveness. 3 $ 6,695  
5. Determine and compare straying of fall chinook salmon into the Snake and upper Columbia rivers for all groups. a. Wire tag groups at Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries, determine tag retention, submit tag release reports to PSMFC. 5 $ 4,463  
b. Transfer fish from raceways to acclimation ponds and release after acclimation. 5 $ 4,463  
c. Recover marked and tagged data from all sources in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Determine straying by group and rearing strategy. 5 $ 4,464  
6 . Determine smolt-to-adult survival, life history characteristics, and cost effectiveness of spring chinook salmon reared in MI and OR raceways and released in the fall. Compare survival of spring chinook salmon reared at UFH and Bonneville Hatcheries a. Recover data from agencies monitoring fisheries, determine life history and survival data. Determine and compare cost effectiveness. No additional cost in FY 2001. 0 $ 0  
7 Determine and compare rearing performance, smolt condition, juvenile migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, life history characteristics, and cost effectiveness of yearling spring chinook salmon reared in MI and OR raceways at UFH. a. Sample fish monthly, prior to transfer and prior to release to determine mean length, weight, condition factor, and/or feed conversion, smolt status and descaling. 5 $ 13,390  
7 b. PIT-tag fish from each raceway, release tagged groups, and submit release reports. Recover PIT-tag data and compare relative survival and duration to John Day and Bonneville dams. 5 $ 13,390  
7 c. Wire tag fish in each raceway, determine tag retention, and submit tag reports. Recover data from agencies monitoring fisheries, determine life history and survival data. Determine and compare cost effectiveness. 5 $ 26,780  
Objective 8 . Determine and compare smolt condition, smolt migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, and life history characteristics between spring chinook salmon reared as yearling smolts at Umatilla and three other hatcheries. a. Sample fish prior to transfer and prior to release to determine mean length, weight, condition factor, and/or feed conversion, smolt status and descaling. 5 $ 6,695 x
8 b. PIT-tag fish from each raceway, release tagged groups, and submit release reports. Recover PIT-tag data and compare relative survival and duration to John Day and Bonneville dams. . 5 $ 6,695  
8 c. Wire tag fish in each raceway, determine tag retention, and submit tag reports. Recover data from agencies monitoring fisheries, determine life history and survival data. Determine and compare cost effectiveness. 5 $ 6,695  
Objective 9. Monitor rearing performance, smolt condition, juvenile migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, life history characteristics, and cost effectiveness of summer steelhead reared in MI raceways. a. Sample fish monthly, prior to transfer and prior to release to determine mean length, weight, condition factor, and/or feed conversion, smolt status and descaling. 4 $ 13,390  
b. PIT-tag fish from each raceway, release tagged groups, and submit release reports. Recover PIT-tag data and compare relative survival and duration to John Day and Bonneville dams 4 $ 13,390  
9 c. Wire tag fish in each raceway, determine tag retention, and submit tag reports. Recover data from agencies monitoring fisheries, determine life history and survival data. Determine and compare cost effectiveness. 4 $ 26,780  
10. Monitor water quality in an index series of MI and OR raceways. a. Summarize water quality data collected from 1992-98. 1 $ 6,695  
11 . Coordinate in the development of a water quality sampling and monitoring program in the Umatilla basin. a. Review existing data, identify if additional sampling is needed during juvenile and adult migration periods. Coordinate with natural production evaluation to ensure hatchery evaluation sampling needs are incorporated into the monitoring program. 1 $ 6,695  
12. Determine annual recreational fishery for chinook salmon and steelhead in the Umatilla River including estimates of catch by tag code. Maximize tag recovery by monitoring catch from local fisheries. a. Identify recreational fishing for fall and spring chinook salmon and steelhead. 1 $ 7,364  
12 b. Develop and implement statistical estimate for effort, catch, harvest, and number harvested by tag code for fall and spring chinook salmon, and steelhead recreational fisheries. 1 $ 58,916  
12 c. Coordinate with biologists in developing a monitoring program for Tribal fisheries. 1 $ 7,365  
13. Participate in planning and coordination activities associated with anadromous fish production and monitoring and evaluation in the Umatilla basin. a. Participate in appropriate technical work groups and task teams to ensure research coordination, experimental, and sampling needs are met. 1 $ 53,560  
14. Monitor and evaluate the health and disease status of chinook salmon and steelhead juveniles reared at Umatilla Hatchery, of adult broodstocks providing gametes for the Umatilla program, and, as possible, of CWT marked fish. a. Examine morbid or moribund fish each month from each raceway, randomly examine gill tissue and body scrapings. Prior to release examine grab-sampled fish of each species and stock. 1 $ 19,678  
b. Develop disease profiles of fish reared under differing conditions and make comparative assessments between rearing strategies. 1 $ 19,678  
c. Conduct fish health investigations to determine the etiology of problems, identify appropriate therapy or rearing modifications, recommend prophylactic disease control measures as needed.. 1 $ 19,678  
d. Collect and assay weekly subsamples of ovarian fluid for culturable viruses from spawned females, collect and assay pyloric caeca/kidney/spleen samples, assay by ELISA, kidney samples from spawned spring chinook salmon females. 1 $ 19,677  
Objective 15. Complete an annual report of progress that summarizes results of work during the fiscal year. a. Write and submit a draft report by 1 December and submit a final report by 1 February. 1 $ 77,006  


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Monitoring and Evaluation Phase

FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2002 FY 2003
$616,419 $634,911 $581,034 $598,465


Section 8. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2001 Cost
Supplies wire-tags and supplies $ 97,724
Indirect 26.6% $ 25,995
Subcontractor temporary employees $ 69,592
Personnel FTE: 6 $221,955
Fringe $ 86,685
Supplies 0 $ 97,214
Travel $ 3,461
Indirect 26.6% $108,878
PIT tags # of tags: 12000 $ 28,800
Subcontractor temporary employees $ 16,618
Subcontractor lab analyses $ 500
Total Itemized Budget $757,422


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2001 project cost $757,422
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 40,000
Total FY 2001 budget request $717,422
FY 2001 forecast from 2000 $669,500
% change from forecast 7.2%


Reason for change in estimated budget

The increase in the estimated budget was the result of increased tagging costs and a reduction in the number of tags on-hand.


Reason for change in scope

Not applicable


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2002 2003 2004 2005
Operations and maintenance $199,110 $205,084 $211,236 $217,573
Monitoring and evaluation $581,034 $598,465 $616,419 $634,911
Total Outyear Budgets $780,144 $803,549 $827,655 $852,484
 

Other Budget Explanation

Not applicable


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

CBFWA Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Ongoing Funding: yes; New Funding: no
Date:
Jul 14, 2000
2001
$757,422
Comment:
The cost of CWTs for this project has dramatically increased due to the loss of an access to inexpensive tags. Prior to this year, the project sponsor's tag cost was $5/1000. Reduction in costs may occur if the fall chinook sub-yearling program is reduced at the Umatilla hatchery (198343500 and 198903500).

Proposed $40,000 in FY 2000 carry forward.


NWPPC Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Sep 13, 2000
2001
$693,311
Comment:
Rationale: Budget increase inappropriate in this review.

NW Power and Conservation Council's FY 2006 Project Funding Review Funding category:
expense
Date:
May 2005
FY05 NPCC Start of Year:
$572,848
FY06 NPCC Staff Preliminary:
$572,848
FY06 NPCC July Draft Start of Year:
$572,848
Sponsor (ODFW) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

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