Return to Proposal Finder FY 2001 Ongoing Proposal 199604601

Proposal Table of Contents

Additional Documents

Section 1. General Administrative information
Section 2. Past accomplishments
Section 3. Relationships to other projects
Section 4. Budgets for planning/design phase
Section 5. Budgets for construction/implementation phase
Section 6. Budgets for operations/maintenance phase
Section 7. Budgets for monitoring/evaluation phase
Section 8. Budget Summary

Reviews and Recommendations
No documents associated with this request


Section 1. General Administrative Information

Title of Project Proposal Walla Walla Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement
BPA Project Proposal Number 199604601
Business name of agency, institution,
or organization requesting funding
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
Business acronym (if appropriate) CTUIR
 

Proposal contact person or principal investigator

Name Jed Volkman
Mailing Address
City, State, Zip Pendleton, OR 97801
Phone 5412764109
Fax 5412764348
E-mail jedvolkman@ctuir.com
 
Manager of program authorizing this project Gary James
 
Review Cycle FY 2001 Ongoing
Province Columbia Plateau
Subbasin Walla Walla
 
Short Description Protect and enhance riparian habitat with particular emphasis on the holding, spawning, and rearing areas of salmonid fishes, thus promoting natural ecological function and improved water quality and quantity.
Target Species


Project Location

[No information]


Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs)

Sponsor-Reported Relevant RPAs

Sponsor listed no RPAs for this project proposal

Relevant RPAs based upon NMFS & BPA Review

NMFS and BPA did not associate any reasonable and prudent alternatives with this project proposal


Biological Outcomes of this project: This project implemented nearly seven miles of stream restoration work in FY2000, with an additional 5-10 miles expected in FY 2001. The project focuses on areas of the basin that are expected to provide the greatest benefit to salmonid fishes. Pre-project surveys are done to identify factors most limiting salmonid production, typically excessive water temperatures and inadequate pool habitat. Restoration efforts are then designed to best meet these needs with a long-term goal of restoring proper floodplain and channel function. Expected biological outcomes include: 1. Improved survival of incubating eggs through reduction of sediment input and water temperatures. 2. Elevated juvenile densities and survival as a result of improved channel diversity, pool habitat, riparian cover, and return of invertebrate species. 3. Improved adult return and usage as a result of elevated pool holding habitat and spawning gravels. 4. Increased riparian and upland vegetation by excluding livestock, supplementing native plants, encouraging floodplain function, and stabilizing channel form to reduce erosion. . Livestock exclusion, supplemental planting and large wood reintroduction will primarily be used to meet biological outcomes. Only as needed, channel configuration work will be implemented to accelerate and protect bank improvements. Over time, and the return of a healthy riparian plant community, we expect improvements in bank stability, shade, insect drop, macroinvertebrate populations, large wood recruitment, pool formation, bank storage, and ultimately elevated juvenile outmigration and adult return. It's understood that ecological benefits associated with habitat restoration often require years to come to fruition. And, that biological outcomes, particularly those that are measurable, may be difficult to quantify and directly credit to restoration efforts. We have found that the recovery rate of project sites varies considerably with annual rainfall and past land use. Restoration approach also plays a significant role in the response of biological indicators. For example, salmonid populations will typically respond quickly to large wood and pool reintroduction. This may not, however, represent the best long-term management proposal for the site. Habitat restoration is a slow business at best and although some sites will provide measurable indicators almost immediately, others may take a decade to produce similar results.
Biological Data: The main objective of this project is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak and reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Project design focuses on correcting habitat factors most limiting salmonid production. The monitoring program is designed to measure biological outcomes resulting from restoration activities. The following pre and post project methods and resultant data are used to measure and evaluate biological outcomes and allow for adaptive management. 1. Summer stream temperatures (max, min, mean) are monitored from May through October of each year. This information is useful in demonstrating changes over time as a result of project activities and also as an indicator of watershed health for future restoration needs. 2. Cross-sections are collected pre-project then once every five years thereafter. This information is useful in demonstrating changes in channel grade, width to depth ratios and habitat type. 3. Fixed location photo-points are taken in early July of each year. This information provides managers with a visual tool of change over time and aids in the promotion of restoration activities. 4. Fish population estimates are collected (electroshocking) pre project then once per year thereafter. This effort has consistently demonstrated that habitat restoration efforts are improving the suitability of the site for salmonid rearing and refuge. Exceptionally large increases in abundance have been found following instream improvements such as weirs, revetments, etc. The information is also useful in determining habit use, species composition, and densities. 5. In an effort to better understand trends in vegetation, stem counts will be included during the summer of 2000. Data collected will include stems per acre and be categorized to shrub or tree type. The fixed-points established for cross-sections mentioned in number "2" above will serve as reference points for the vegetation counts. Counts will be done during the first year, then once every other year thereafter. Information on plant survival and planting technique will be correlated to vegetation counts and used to direct future planting efforts.


CBFWA-Generated Information

Database Administrator notes on the history of this proposal form: None
Type of Project (assigned by CBFWA Analysts): anadromous


Section 2. Past Accomplishments

Year Accomplishment
1997 Developed long term leases with landowners on Blue Creek (Langert and Gardner)
1997 With NRCS and ODFW cooperatively designed instream work for project on Couse Creek (Shumway)
1997 Developed project design for Blue Creek projects
1997 Obtained all necessary archeological and instream work clearances
1997 Developed subcontracts for weed control, planting, heavy equipment rental, fencing, rock, and tree supply
1997 Constructed 3-vortex rock weirs, four log weirs, 2 rootwad revetments, one log revetment on Blue Creek
1997 Constructed four rock barbs, 3 log revetments, placed 40 trees as large woody debris on Couse Creek (Shumway)
1997 Placed 1500 willow cuttings on Blue Creek, 2000 willows on Couse Creek
1997 Collected monitoring information including water temperatures, photo points, cross-sections, and salmonid population estimates
1997 Identified habitat limited sites within basin, prioritized sites, selected potential project sites for restoration in 1998
1997 Completed annual report of progress
1998 Secured cost-share of $10,000 for WSU watershed assessment for Walla Walla Basin
1998 Developed long-term lease with landowner on Mainstem Walla Walla River (Lampson)
1998 Obtained all necessary archeological clearances
1998 Developed project design for Mainstem Walla Walla River
1998 Developed subcontracts for weed control, planting, heavy equipment rental, fencing, rock and tree supply
1998 Chemically treated for weeds, then disced, raked, and seeded 18 acres of native grass on mainstem Walla Walla River
1998 Planted 350 bare-root stock plants and with aid of an excavator and stinger, planted 880 willow cuttings and 246 cottonwood posts on Blue Creek Project Areas
1998 Planted 700 bare root stock plants on Couse Creek
1998 Collected monitoring information including water temperatures, photo points, cross-sections, and salmonid population estimates
1998 Identified habitat limited sites within basin, prioritized sites, selected potential project sites for restoration in 1999
1998 Completed annual report of progress
1999 Secured $100,000 of cost-share for riparian restoration work from the State of Washington Governor's Salmon Funds Program
1999 Developed long term leases with landowners on Couse Creek (Hasso) and Patit Creek (Brown) for a total of 5 stream miles
1999 Obtained all necessary instream work clearances for Blue Creek and archeological clearances for Couse and Patit Creeks
1999 Constructed one rock vortex weir and placed 5 large rootwads with boles into existing pool habitat on Blue Creek
1999 With aid of excavator, placed 800 additional willow cuttings to excavated trenches on Blue Creek Project Sites
1999 Planted 3000 bare-root stock plants into project area on Couse Creek (Shumway)
1999 Cooperatively with the FSA of Washington and Oregon developed a landowner lease that allows both the CTUIR and federal CREP program to be implemented together
1999 Developed fencing plans and contracts for construction on Patit Creek and Couse Creek
1999 Constructed 1.8 miles of livestock exclusion fence on Couse Creek (Hasso)
1999 Constructed 4 miles of livestock exclusion fence on Patit Creek
1999 Secured $55,000 dollars of cost-share for riparian restoration work from the State of Washington Salmon Funding Recovery Board to be used in FY2000
1999 Chemically treated for weeds, then disced, raked, and seeded 18 acres of native grass on Mainstem Walla Walla River
1999 Collected monitoring information including water temperatures, photo points, cross-sections, and salmonid population estimates
1999 Identified habitat limited sites within basin, prioritized sites, selected potential project sites for restoration in 2000
1999 Completed annual report of progress
2000 Sign long term lease with landowner on Patit Creek (Fletcher) protecting an additional 1 mile of stream
2000 Design restoration plan for Patit Creek (Brown) and Couse Creek (Hasso)
2000 Plant 4000 bare root stock plants and 3000 willow cuttings (excavator/stinger) within project area on Couse Creek (Hasso)
2000 Secure all archeological and instream work clearances
2000 Construct 2 miles of riparian fence and plant 4000 bare root stock plants on Patit Creek (Fletcher)
2000 With NRCS, design off-channel watering system, plant 3000 bare root stock plants, construct two rootwad revetments, three rock weirs, and place large woody debris on Patit Creek (Brown)
2000 Collect monitoring information including water temperatures, photo points, cross-sections, vegetation counts, and salmonid population estimates
2000 Identify habitat limited sites within basin, prioritize sites, select potential project sites for restoration in 2001
2000 Complete annual report of progress


Section 3. Relationships to Other Projects

n/a or no information


Section 4. Budget for Planning and Design Phase

Task-based Budget

Objective Task Duration in FYs Estimated 2001 cost Subcontractor
1. Identify, prioritize, and select habitat restoration sites, develop long term riparian easements with landowners. a. Identify potential project sites through watershed assessment, public outreach, landowner contact, and interagency communication ongoing $ 5,000  
b. Conduct on-site visits, evaluate site potential for restoration (access, landowner participation, cost-share, likelihood of success, benefit to salmonid species) ongoing $ 3,000  
c. Select top priority sites for future restoration efforts ongoing $ 1,000  
d. Develop long-term (15 years or longer) or perpetual easements. 1, ongoing $ 3,000  
2. Pursue cost-share opportunities and obtain necessary state and federal clearances a. Develop grants, proposals and coordinate with local, state, and federal agencies to develop cost-share projects. Recruit project volunteers, including local students, watershed council, and summer youth. 1, ongoing $ 6,000  
b. Secure instream fill permits; Corps of Engineers 404, Division of State Lands removal/fill, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife HPA, archeological clearances, NEPA, ESA. 1, ongoing $ 4,000  
3. Identify site-specific limiting factors, develop project design, prepare pre-project contracts a. Conduct pre-project field surveys (including time with hydrologist) to identify habitat factors most limiting salmonid production. 1, ongoing $ 14,200  
b. Develop project design (in some cases will require time for hydrologist). 1, ongoing $ 8,226  
Solicit bids and develop subcontracts for weed control, planting, heavy equipment rental, fencing, rock and tree supply. 1, ongoing $ 5,216  


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Planning and Design Phase

FY 2003 FY 2005 FY 2004 FY 2002
$ 55,777 $ 62,671 $ 59,124 $ 52,620


Section 5. Budget for Construction and Implementation Phase

Task-based Budget

Objective Task Duration in FYs Estimated 2001 cost Subcontractor
4. Implement and maintain riparian habitat enhancement projects in the Walla Walla River Basin a. Establish and collect pre-project photo-points, transects, fish population assessments, and vegetation counts. $ 6,000  
b. Implement project-this task may include riparian fencing, native grass seeding, tree and shrub plantings, bioengineering techniques, noxious weed treatment in project areas, construction of instream structures. $103,787 x


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Construction and Implementation Phase

FY 2003 FY 2005 FY 2004 FY 2002
$123,356 $138,603 $130,758 $116,374


Section 6. Budget for Operations and Maintenance Phase

Task-based Budget

Objective Task Duration in FYs Estimated 2001 cost Subcontractor
5. Provide Project Administration a. Develop and prepare quarterly reports for submission to BPA. Content will include a summary of significant results and activities, problems encountered, and planned activities 1 $ 1,000  
b. Develop and prepare annual report of progress to BPA. 1 $ 5,000  
c. Develop and prepare BPA funding proposal as per requirements and deadlines established for fiscal year 2002. 1 $ 2,000  
6. Conduct Annual Project Maintenance a. Maintain riparian plantings. This may include watering, maintenance/replacement of weed guards, protective tubes, and replacement planting as a result of mortality. typically necessary during the first 3 yrs of project $ 46,276  
b. Conduct annual weed control as necessary to reduce competition from noxious and invasive non-native weeds. Methods might include hand pulling, herbicide and biological control methods. typically necessary during the first 3 yrs of project $ 5,000 x
c. Conduct annual maintenance on instream structures, streambank stabilization/bioengineering structures, and riparian fence/water gaps. mostly required in early stages of project, fence repairs may be necessary for length of easement $ 31,484 x


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Operations and Maintenance Phase

FY 2003 FY 2005 FY 2004 FY 2002
$101,977 $114,582 $108,096 $ 96,205


Section 7. Budget for Monitoring and Evaluation Phase

Task-based Budget

Objective Task Duration in FYs Estimated 2001 cost Subcontractor
7. Collect long-term monitoring information, evaluate success of methodology, and implement adaptive management. a. Collect post-project monitoring data including photo points, fish population densities, transects, vegetation counts. 1 $ 4,010  
b. Analyze monitoring data, conduct on-site visits and compare project methods taken by the CTUIR and others to determine project success and allow for adaptive management. ongoing $ 6,710  


Outyear Objective-Based Budget

n/a or no information


Outyear Budgets for Monitoring and Evaluation Phase

FY 2003 FY 2005 FY 2004 FY 2002
$ 12,044 $ 13,533 $ 12,767 $ 11,363


Section 8. Estimated Budget Summary

Itemized Budget

Item Note FY 2001 Cost
Personnel FTE: .79 $ 26,500
Fringe @30% $ 7,950
Supplies $ 500
Travel $ 2,097
Indirect @34% $ 12,595
NEPA included in personnel above $ 0
Personnel FTE: .56 $ 18,818
Fringe @30% $ 5,645
Supplies $ 18,532
Travel $ 3,166
Indirect @34% $ 15,694
Subcontractor $ 47,932
Personnel FTE: 1.15 $ 38,624
Fringe @30% $ 11,587
Supplies $ 5,844
Travel $ 4,214
Indirect @34% $ 20,491
Subcontractor $ 10,000
Personnel FTE: .15 $ 5,000
Fringe @30% $ 1,500
Supplies $ 500
Travel $ 1,000
Indirect @34% $ 2,720
Total Itemized Budget $260,909


Total estimated budget

Total FY 2001 project cost $260,909
Amount anticipated from previously committed BPA Funds $ 0
Total FY 2001 budget request $260,909
FY 2001 forecast from 2000 $285,000
% change from forecast - 8.5%


Reason for change in estimated budget

The change in estimated budget results from budget cuts made in FY 2000. Increases for FY 2001 above are primarily a result of cost-of-living/expenses and personnel merit.


Reason for change in scope

NA


Cost Sharing

Not applicable
 

Outyear Budget Totals

2002 2003 2004 2005
Planning and design $ 52,620 $ 55,777 $ 59,124 $ 62,671
Construction/implementation $116,374 $123,356 $130,758 $138,603
Operations and maintenance $ 96,205 $101,977 $108,096 $114,582
Monitoring and evaluation $ 11,363 $ 12,044 $ 12,767 $ 13,533
Total Outyear Budgets $276,562 $293,154 $310,745 $329,389
 

Other Budget Explanation

Not applicable


Reviews and Recommendations

This information was not provided on the original proposals, but was generated during the review process.

CBFWA Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Ongoing Funding: yes; New Funding: no
Date:
Jul 14, 2000
2001
$260,909
Comment:
The change in estimated budget results from budget cuts made in FY 2000. Increases for FY 2001 above are primarily a result of cost-of-living/expenses and personnel merit.

NWPPC Funding Recommendation Recommendation:
Fund
Date:
Sep 13, 2000
2001
$251,122
Comment:
Rationale: Budget increase inappropriate in this review.

NW Power and Conservation Council's FY 2006 Project Funding Review Funding category:
expense
Date:
May 2005
FY05 NPCC Start of Year:
$277,617
FY06 NPCC Staff Preliminary:
$277,617
FY06 NPCC July Draft Start of Year:
$277,617
Sponsor (Confederated Tribes Of The Umatilla Indian Reservation) Comments (Go to Original on NPCC Website):

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