BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1997 Proposal

Section 1. Administrative
Section 2. Narrative
Section 3. Budget

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Administrative

Title of project
Klaskanine Watershed Restoration Project

BPA project number   5505400

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
Clatsop Soil & Water Conservation District

Sponsor type   OR-State/Local Agency

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameTom Iverson
 Mailing address750 Commercial, Suite 207
P.O. Box 716
Astoria, OR 97103
 Phone503/325-4571

BPA technical contact   , EWP

Biological opinion ID   

NWPPC Program number   

Short description
Fencing livestock, installing culverts and planting trees and grass.

Project start year   1997    End year   

Start of operation and/or maintenance   1997

Project development phase   Implementation

Section 2. Narrative

Related projects

Project history
New Project

Biological results achieved
New Project

Annual reports and technical papers
New Project

Management implications
New Project

Specific measureable objectives
Several benefits from this project would include the following: reduction of sediment inputs would increase egg survival and spawning habitat, improvement of culverts and other crossings would increase juvenile and adult fishpassage, improved summer flows and temperatures would increase egg and juvenile survival, improve water quality by controlling livestock in the stream and controlling coliform levels, would increase oxygen levels and rearing capacity.

Testable hypothesis
Fish biologists with ODF&W will be able to monitor catch results as well as on-going instream spawning, juvenile population and habitat surveys.

Underlying assumptions or critical constraints
An increase in salmonid smot-production of the Klaskanine River and its tributaries is an integral benefit from this type of work. Significant areas of the Columbia River Basin are not accessible to anadromous fish because they are blocked by natural or man-made barriers. The Lower Columbia geology consists of an underlying, relatively soft marine sedimentary rock. This results in a potential for erosion and sedimentation in the area.

Methods
The fences will be New Zealand type electric. This type of fence has been very successfully used on the Nehalem River project just being completed. This project will be performed by underemployed commercial fishermen.

Brief schedule of activities
We will build 80,000 feet of fence, install ten culverts and plant 3,000 trees.

Biological need
An increase in salmonid smot-production capacity of Klaskanine River, and its tributaries, is an integral benefit from this type of work. Significant areas of the Columbia River Basin are not accessible to anadromous fish because they are blocked by natural or man-made barriers. The Lower Columbia geology consists of an underlying, relatively soft marine sedimentary rock. This relusts in a greater potential for erosion and sedimentation in the area.

Critical uncertainties
None

Summary of expected outcome
Several benefits from this project would include the following: *reduction of sediment inputs would increase egg survival and spawning habitat, *improvement of culverts and other crossings would increase juvenile and adult fish passage, *improved summer flows and temperatures would increase egg and juvenile survival, *improved water quality by excluding livestock from the stream and controlling coliform levels would increase oxygen levels and rearing capacity, *restored riparian areas would provide future recruitment as woody debris and food from associated insects, *overall improvement in the instream and riparian areas would benefit both aquatic and terrestrial wildlife, while providing erosion and flood control.

Dependencies/opportunities for cooperation
Weather

Risks
None

Monitoring activity
Fish biologists with ODF&W will be able to monitor catch results as well as existing instream spawning, juvenile population, and habitat surveys. Eighty thousand (80,000) feet of fence will control livestock from tide water to the timberlands. The natural filtering of the water will help protect water quality from past and future farming and timber practices. Proper culverts and bridges allow salmon and agriculture to co-exist and opens up more natural fish habitat.

Section 3. Budget

Data shown are the total of expense and capital obligations by fiscal year. Obligations for any given year may not equal actual expenditures or accruals within the year, due to carryover, pre-funding, capitalization and difference between operating year and BPA fiscal year.

Historic costsFY 1996 budget data*Current and future funding needs
(none) New project - no FY96 data available 1997: 270,000

* For most projects, Authorized is the amount recommended by CBFWA and the Council. Planned is amount currently allocated. Contracted is the amount obligated to date of printout.

Funding recommendations

CBFWA funding review group   Below Bonneville Dam

Recommendation    Tier 2 - fund when funds available

Recommended funding level   $270,000