BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1997 Proposal

Section 1. Administrative
Section 2. Narrative
Section 3. Budget

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Administrative

Title of project
Natural Population Conservation Coordination Program

BPA project number   5507900

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
Bill M. Bakke

Sponsor type   OR-Consultant

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameBill M. Bakke
 Mailing addressBill M. Bakke
6261 SW 47th Place
Portland, Oregon 97221
 Phone503/246-5890

BPA technical contact   , EWP

Biological opinion ID   

NWPPC Program number   7.1D.2

Short description
Project would provide a coordinated natural production program among state and tribal agencies.

Project start year   1997    End year   1999

Start of operation and/or maintenance   2000

Project development phase   Planning

Section 2. Narrative

Related projects
7.1C.3, 7.1C.4, 7.1D.1 This project is closely related but distinct from collecting information on natural populations (7.1C.3), monitoring natural populations (7.1C.4), and development of a conservation policy for natural populations (7.1D.1).

Project history

Biological results achieved

Annual reports and technical papers

Management implications

Specific measureable objectives
Established protocol, objectives, and standards for the conservation of natural and wild populations within and among states and tribes.

Testable hypothesis
Have the states and tribes established protocol, objectives and standards for conservation of natural and wild populations by 1999 that are approved by the Independent Scientific Advisory Board?

Underlying assumptions or critical constraints
The assumption is that the fish management agencies and tribes want to complete this task for the improved management of Columbia River salmon and steelhead.

Methods
Establish a technical team of 9 members to develop the conceptual framework of a natural population conservation program including the protocols, objectives, and standards. The product of this scientific team will be presented to the state and tribal agencies for review and comment. The final draft program will go to the Independent Scientific Advisory Board for comment. A final program will then go to the Power Planning Council for public review and adoption.

Brief schedule of activities
In 1997 the technical team will meet to develop the conceptual framework for the natural population conservation program. Once this work is done (12 months) it will be provided to the state and tribal fish agencies for review and comment. The review and comment period will extend into 1998. In 1998 the technical team will produce its final report and recommendations to the Independent Scientific Advisory Board. Once the ISAB has provided the technical team its comments, the final report will go to the Power Planning Council which will provide the recommendations to the public for review and comment and adopted in 1999 or 2000, depending on their schedule.

Biological need
The Power Planning Council's fish and wildlife program calls for the conservation of biological diversity and gene conservation. This proposal will establish a framework for natural and wild salmonid populations that will fulfill those Council policies. At this time the management of Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations lacks specific management direction, coordinated among the comanagers, for the long-term, sustainable production of wild and natural populations of anadromous salmonids. This proposal will provide the means by which the Power Council and the fish agency comanagers can establish a comprehensive management program for all elements of production. In addition, this program will allow the agencies to develop management plans that will track the biological condition of each wild and natural population such that adaptive management is a possibility and populations not listed under the ESA can be managed so they do not decline to the point of emergency management under the ESA.

Critical uncertainties
Will a coordinated program for the conservation of natural and wild populations be adopted by the comanagers? Will the program, if adopted, be enough to prevent loss of biological diversity, genetic diversity, and stem the extinction of natural populations of anadromous salmonids in the Columbia River basin?

Summary of expected outcome
A coordinated program for natural and wild populations of salmonids will be adopted and implemented by the comanagers. This scientifically sound program will prevent further loss of biological diversity and genetic information represented by these populations. These populations are then the basis for long-term and sustained production of salmon and steelhead for public benefit.

Dependencies/opportunities for cooperation
This project is dependent upon cooperation and adoption by the comanagers, the Power Planning Council and acceptance of the public. The continued implementation of this project will depend upon support from the comanagers, Power Planning Council and BPA.

Risks
The risks associated with this project relate to the loss of biological diversity and genetic information represented by natural and wild populations if the project is not implemented. This loss will severely compromise the ability of the comanagers to meet production goals and to maintain sustainable fisheries over the long-term.

Monitoring activity
Once the comanagers adopt a coordinated program for the conservation of natural and wild anadromous salmonids in the Columbia River basin, this program should be evaluated by the comanagers annually and by the Independent Scientific Advisory Board every five years to determine whether the objectives of the program are being achieved. An annual report on the progress of the program and the status of natural, wild populations should be provided to the Power Planning Council and the public each year.

Section 3. Budget

Data shown are the total of expense and capital obligations by fiscal year. Obligations for any given year may not equal actual expenditures or accruals within the year, due to carryover, pre-funding, capitalization and difference between operating year and BPA fiscal year.

Historic costsFY 1996 budget data*Current and future funding needs
(none) New project - no FY96 data available 1997: 140,500
1998: 50,000

* For most projects, Authorized is the amount recommended by CBFWA and the Council. Planned is amount currently allocated. Contracted is the amount obligated to date of printout.

Funding recommendations

CBFWA funding review group   System Policy

Recommendation    Tier 3 - do not fund