BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1997 Proposal

Section 1. Administrative
Section 2. Narrative
Section 3. Budget

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Administrative

Title of project
Grande Ronde Basin, Joseph Creek Subbasin, Wallowa Valley Ranger District Project Implementation

BPA project number   5508100

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
USFS

Sponsor type   OR-Federal Agency

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameKevin Martin / Duane Kloes
 Mailing addressWallowa Mountains Office
88401 Hwy. 82
Enterprise, OR 97828
 Phone503/426-4978

BPA technical contact   , EWP

Biological opinion ID   

NWPPC Program number   

Short description
Streams requiring rehabilitation in the Grand Ronde Basin, Joseph Creek Subbasin were prioritized in 1983 by a team of agency and tribal biologists representing the Forest Service, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation. Program objectives are to rehabilitate instream aquatic and riparian habitats for salmon and steelhead production. Quality instream and overhead cover will be directly improved utilizing three complementary approaches; 1) instream structure additions - large woody material, boulders, root wads, and/or combinations of these. 2) riparian fencing - exclosure units designed to optimize recovery efforts. 3) streamside vegetation plantings - native deciduous and coniferous species.

Project start year   1997    End year   2001

Start of operation and/or maintenance   1988

Project development phase   Implementation

Section 2. Narrative

Related projects
Projects completed to date that relate in application within the Joseph
Creek Subbasin; (NOTE: Below projects overlap, ie; planting within exclosure
units).

Miles of Riparian Protection Fence

Chesnimnus Creek - 25.3 = 12.65 miles of stream exclosure

Devils Run Creek - 5.5 = 2.75

Elk Creek - 8.1 = 4.05

Peavine Creek - 6.5 = 3.25

Davis Creek - 5.6 = 2.80

Vance Draw - 1.5 = 0.75

Dry Forks Creek - 1.0 = 0.50
53.5 = 26.75

Miles of stream with ongoing riparian revegetation programs

Chesnimnus Creek - 10.65

Devils Run Creek - 2.75

Elk Creek - 5.10

Peavine Creek - 3.25
21.75

Miles of stream treated with instream habitat improvement structures

Chesnimnus Creek - 14.25

Devils Run - Creek 3.75

Elk Creek - 5.10

Peavine Creek - 3.25

TNT Creek - 1.20

Vance Draw - .75
28.30

Project history
As stated previously, in 1988 the Wallowa Valley Ranger District, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration began a extensive program of riparian/fisheries restoration and enhancement.

The Bonneville Power Administration has previously funded this project under contract No. DE-A179-84-BP-17578, Project No. 84-9;

FY 93 - $ 16,590
FY 92 - $ 54,971
FY 91 - $116,904
FY 90 - $102,653
FY 89 - $128,648
FY 88 - $102,856

Biological results achieved
To date The Wallowa Valley Ranger District has accomplished 26.75 miles of riparian/fisheries restoration within the Joseph Creek Subbasin. Fisheries habitat improvement accomplishments occur in three major work activities:

(1) Project monitoring, evaluation and reporting.
(2) Maintenance of previous projects.
(3) Implementation of habitat rehabilitation projects.

Biological results achieved as a results of a comprehensive restoration program include, re-establishment of riparian vegetation, including trees and shrubs, increased bank stability, increased stream shading resulting in decreased water temperatures, increased spawning and rearing habitat, increased soil productivity, decreased sediment production, and a rejuvenated riparian zone.

Annual reports and technical papers
Annual reports include those made to the Bonneville Power Administration
under Contract no. DE-AI19-84-BP-17578, Project No. 84-9.

Management implications
An indirect and highly beneficial effect of the ten year effort has been the building of a fisheries program on the Wallowa Valley Ranger District which has resulted in an increased awareness of the importance of streams and fish habitat by District personnel and the public. The Joseph Creek watershed is managed exclusively for wild steelhead trout production. Current steelhead production potential for the Grand Ronde Basin is estimated at 16,566 adults and 432,844 smolts (ODFW 1986).

Knowledge gained from this program has increased the knowledge pool for habitat restoration. Measuring the results of completed projects has allowed fisheries professionals to design current and future restoration projects with predicable results. Knowledge includes such factors as what works, what does not, and what restoration activities cost. In addition, the Blue Mountains Natural Resource Instituteœ has adopted Elk Creek as a Demonstration Project for the purpose of "demonstrating" the knowledge gained from restoration activities and how to transfer and apply that knowledge to other public and private lands.

Specific measureable objectives
Limiting factors associated with instream and riparian habitat degradation
were identified by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, USDA Forest
Service, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation (1984). These
Factors are:
1) High summer water temperatures
2) Low summer flows
3) Lack of riparian vegetation
4) Lack of (instream) habitat diversity
5) Lack of channel stability

Specific measurable objectives are;
1) Stream Surface Shaded; Objective - Between 60% and 100% of the stream surface should be shaded form June to September during the hours of 10 A.M. and 4 P.M.

2) Stream Bank Stability; Objective - Stream banks should have 80% or more of their total lineal distance in a stable condition.Ė

3) Streambed Sedimentation; Objective - No more than 15% of stream substrate should be covered by inorganic sediment.

4) Grass-Forb Cover; Objective - Riparian zones should provide at least 80% of the site enhancement potential.

5) Shrub Cover; Objective - Riparian zones should provide at least 80% ofthe site enhancement potential.

6) Tree Cover; Objective Riparian zones should provide at least 80% of the site enhancement potential crown cover for sites that would naturally be dominated by trees. For riparian zones that naturally contain only a few trees per acre (20 or less), optimum tree cover for wildlife is considered to be 100% of potential.

Testable hypothesis
NA

Underlying assumptions or critical constraints
None

Methods
Fisheries habitat improvement implementation will occur in three major work activities:

(1) Project monitoring, evaluation and reporting.
-pre-project monitoring
-post-project monitoring, first year after accomplishment and every 3 to 5 years following until objectives are met.
-evaluation and reporting, first year after accomplishment

(2) Maintenance of previous projects.
-as needed (funded on a separate project proposal)

(3) Implementation of habitat rehabilitation projects. Individual projects may include one or all of the items listed below, action items dependant on the need of the individual stream reach;
-instream habitat restoration
-hand planting of riparian vegetation
-construction of riparian protection fencing

Brief schedule of activities
DRY FORKS: Scheduled 1997

This creek was part of the 1990 stream survey (see file for results and discussion). It is a Class IV stream but has potential for Class II (ie., low gradient, and relatively large drainage area). Project Work Plan on file. The survey length was 2.9 miles, divided into 3 reaches. Reach 1 is in need of LOM debris and fencing to control livestock grazing. Reach 2 is in need of revegetation and LOM debris. Reach 3 is in need of increasing pool habitat, revegetation of the riparian area, and fencing to control livestock grazing.

Location: T3N R47E Sec. 30, 25, & 26

Description: Reach 1 - (1) Addition of instream habitat (LOM). (2) Construction of approximately 1.6 miles of riparian protection fence to control livestock grazing. Reach 2 - (1) Plant with Lodge Pole Pine, approximately 8 AC. (2) Addition of instream habitat (LOM). Reach 3 - (1) Mechanically increase pool habitat with addition of instream structure. (2) Plant with Lodge Pole Pine, approximately 2.5 AC. (3) Construction of approximately 1.0 mile of riparian protection fence to control livestock grazing. All reaches will receive post project monitoring.

Cost: $26,972

TNT GULCH: Scheduled 1997

TNT Gulch is a major flow contributor to Devils Run Creek. This creek was part of the 1991 stream survey (see file for results and discussion). It is a known Steelhead fisheries (ODF&W). The creek has been severely degraded due to past management activities. Sediment production is high, instream habitat and riparian vegetation, producing shade are non-existent, also floodplain has been severely compacted. Two miles of stream are in need of instream habitat, revegetation of the riparian zone, and fencing to control livestock grazing. Project Work Plan on file.

PROJECT 1

Location: T3N R47E Sec. 10, parallel to Rd. 4690

Description: (1) Construction of 4.0 miles of riparian protection fence. Fence line was laid out FY 89. (2) Revegetation of riparian zone with Lodge Pole Pine, approximately 10 AC. (3) Pre- and post-project monitoring.

Cost: $38,364

PROJECT 2

Location: T3N R47E Sec. 14, parallel to Rd. 4690

Description: (1) Reconstruct an existing exclosure on TNT Gulch. This fence was constructed in 1989 to protect seedlings. It has served that purpose and is no longer required for that purpose. The fence includes the stream channel, the fence is no longer needed to protect seedlings. This project purposes to reduce the size of the exclosure from 15 AC to approximately 4 AC, and include only the stream channel and immediate riparian zone. This will reduce maintenance requirements and increase livestock forage available, while continuing to protect the stream channel. (2) Addition of large woody material. (3) Plant with Lodge Pole and Ponderosa Pine. (4) Pre and post project monitoring.

Cost: $25,000

WEST FORK PEAVINE CREEK: Scheduled 1998

Location: T4N R46E Sec 19

The W. Fork Peavine Creek is a second order stream, rising of the west rim of Getchel Ridge and flowing four miles in a southeasterly direction to join East Fork Peavine to form Peavine proper. West Fork Peavine Creek is a Class II stream. This creek was part of the 1992 stream survey (see file for results and discussion).

Description: The W. Fork Peavine Creek is a second order stream, rising of the west rim of Getchel Ridge and flowing four miles in a southeasterly direction to join East Fork Peavine to form Peavine proper. West Fork Peavine Creek is a Class II stream. In 1994 large woody material was added to the West Fork to create diversified instream habitat, cover, and create pools. What is required is (1) establishment of fixed photo points, (2) two exclosure fences and (3) riparian plantings.

Cost: $7,000

GOULD GULCH: Scheduled 1998

Location: T2N R45E Sec. 15

Gould Gulch is a major supplier of high quality water to Elk Creek. Late, summer flows in Gould Gulch are supplied by springs located within the riparian zone.

Description: This project is to construct a exclosure fence protecting a spring source that is being negatively impacted by grazing livestock, loss of water due to ground compaction, loss of water quality due to sediment production, loss of riparian dependant plant species. Project size is approximately 1 acre.

Costs: $2,000

SWAMP CREEK: Scheduled 1998 and 1999

PROJECT 1

This Creek was part of the 1992 stream survey (see files for results and discussion). Class I. Project work plan on file.

Location: T3N R45E Sec. 18, 19, and 30 NE. Project area is located 1/4 mile downstream of the Swamp Creek cow camp continuing downstream for 2 miles.

Description: In 1986 41 log weirs were constructed within this reach. This project was completed with KV program dollars. Since the original construction in 1986 no maintenance activities have occurred. A inventory of the structures conducted 1992 reveals that 12 structures are in need of intensive maintenance or reconstruction to bring the structures up to design goals. Note: The 1986 project also included willow plantings and construction of a riparian pasture fence to control livestock access.

Cost: $5,000

PROJECT 2

Location: T3N R45E Sec 31, T2N R45E Sec 6, 7, 18, 19

Description: In 1995 the Forest Service acquired approximately 6 miles of Swamp Creek that had been previously privately owned. During private ownership the property was managed for livestock grazing and timber production. This project is to (1) construct 8 miles of riparian protection fencing (exclosure), and (2) reintroduce large woody material into the channel.

Cost: $50,000 (#30,000 first year, $20,000 second year)

ALDER CREEK-HEADWATERSϥ: Scheduled 1998

A tributary to Chesnimnus Creek of the Joseph Creek drainage. A formal inventory of 2.2 miles was conducted in 1986 by ODF&W from the National Forest boundary to the National Forest boundary. The streambank condition indicate erosion is taking place; the majority of stream banks are unstable and soil movement common perhaps due to excess runoff. Stream shade is lacking along with vegetative diversity. The stream also lacks habitat diversity. The creek is in need of instream habitat, vegetative cover and fencing to control livestock grazing. Historically a known Anadromous/Steelhead fisheries. Project Work Plan on file.

Location:T3N R47E Sec. 31 & 32.

Description: (1) Addition of instream habitat diversity (LOM). (2) Revegetate with deciduous vegetation, approximately 8.5 AC. (3) Construction of approximately 4.5 miles of fence to control livestock grazing. (4) Construction of 1/2 mile of Elk Proof exclosure fencing protecting 1/4 mile of stream channel. These materials are on hand, this will be a cooperative project between Range and Fisheries. (5) Pre- and post-project monitoring.

Cost: $17,886

McCARTY CREEK•:œ Scheduled 1999

This creek is a contributor of high quality flow (ie; cool and clear) to Peavine Creek. It was part of the 1990 stream survey and is a known Steelhead fisheries (ODF&W), (see file for results and discussion). Class II. Project Work Plan on file.

Location: T3N R46E Sec. 17

Description: (1) Addition of habitat structures (LOM) to increase habitat diversity. (2) Construction of approximately 1.6 miles of riparian protection fence to control livestock grazing. (3) Plant with deciduous species to enhance riparian vegetation to provide stream shade, approximately 4 AC. (4) Pre- and post-project monitoring.

Cost: $28,861

TAMARACK GULCH: Scheduled 2000

This creek was part of the 1990 stream survey (see file for results and discussion). Class II. Project Work Plan on file. Stream survey length was 1.6 miles, the creek was divided into 2 reaches. The survey indicated that Reach 1 and 2 are in need of increased pool habitat, stream shade, fencing to control livestock grazing, and addition of LOM debris. Work is planned for FY 91-92.

Location: T3N R47E Sec. 35

Description: Reach 1 and 2 - (1) Mechanically increase pool habitat with addition of LOM. (2) Plant with Lodge Pole Pine to increase stream shade, supplement with deciduous vegetation, approximately 10 AC. (3) Construct approximately 3.2 miles of riparian protection fence to control livestock grazing. (4) Addition of LOM to increase instream habitat. (5) Post project monitoring.

Cost: $26,972

CONIFER PLANTING Scheduled 1997 to 2001

The conifer planting would occur within riparian zones that have been logged or grazed heavily in the past. The project would involve planting 15 acres within the riparian areas along steelhead and resident rainbow habitat in the Joseph Creek Section 7 Watershed. Many of the areas will be small locations throughout the stream length (less than one acre), which increases the amount of planting time per acre, thus, increasing cost. The results from the project will be future shade, LWM recruitment, and lower stream temperatures.

Location: Various within the Joseph Creek Watershed

Cost: $6,000 per year

Biological need
The Joseph Creek Subbasin is managed exclusively for wild steelhead trout production. Current steelhead production potential for the Grand Ronde basin is estimated at 16,566 adults and 432,844 smolts (ODFW 1986). To reach this production potential additional fisheries/riparian restoration must occur within the Joseph Creek Subbasin.

Critical uncertainties
None

Summary of expected outcome
The results of continued restoration efforts include, re-establishment of riparian vegetation, including trees and shrubs, increased bank stability, increased stream shading resulting in decreased water temperatures, increased spawning and rearing habitat, increased soil productivity, decreased sediment production, and a rejuvenated riparian zone.

Dependencies/opportunities for cooperation
ĖThe projects only restriction is funding.

Risks
ĖThe are NO risks associated with implementing this project.

Monitoring activity
Aspects of monitoring will include;
1) Establish and photograph fixed photo points
2) Establish permanent stations and record streamwater temperature
3) Monitor channel morphology, establish and monitor permanent stream transects
4) Establish and monitor planting plots for survival and growth

Section 3. Budget

Data shown are the total of expense and capital obligations by fiscal year. Obligations for any given year may not equal actual expenditures or accruals within the year, due to carryover, pre-funding, capitalization and difference between operating year and BPA fiscal year.

Historic costsFY 1996 budget data*Current and future funding needs
(none) New project - no FY96 data available 1997: 96,336
1998: 40,886
1999: 54,861
2000: 32,972

* For most projects, Authorized is the amount recommended by CBFWA and the Council. Planned is amount currently allocated. Contracted is the amount obligated to date of printout.

Funding recommendations

CBFWA funding review group   Snake River

Recommendation    Tier 2 - fund when funds available

Recommended funding level   $96,336