BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1997 Proposal

Section 1. Administrative
Section 2. Narrative
Section 3. Budget

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Administrative

Title of project
Interannual Effects of Marine Conditions on Salmon Distribution, Growth and Abundance

BPA project number   5517700

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
TBD

Sponsor type   Placeholder

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameTBD
 Mailing address
 Phone

BPA technical contact   ,

Biological opinion ID   Research M&E Program, hypo D.2.1

NWPPC Program number   

Short description

Project start year   1997    End year   2007

Start of operation and/or maintenance   0

Project development phase   PLANNING

Section 2. Narrative

Related projects

Project history

Biological results achieved

Annual reports and technical papers

Management implications

Specific measureable objectives

Testable hypothesis
HYPOTHESIS D.2.1: DISTRIBUTION, GROWTH, AND ABUNDANCE OF SALMON FROM THE COLUMBIA RIVER IN OCEAN REARING DO NOT VARY WITHIN OR AMONG YEARS IN RESPONSE TO CHANGES IN OFFSHORE MARINE CONDITIONS.

Underlying assumptions or critical constraints
Offshore here means the open North Pacific Ocean along the continental shelf region, and distant offshore areas of the North Pacific. All offshore studies should be components of a coordinated research effort by Alaska, Canada, and the Pacific Northwest. It makes no sense for various regions to separately study oceanic fisheries ecology without integration.

The BIOP calls for BPA, COE, and BOR to cooperate in investigations of the relationship between fluctuations in the ocean environment and salmon abundance (#13,d., p. 120). Although the BIOP does not specifically deal with the relationship between management of non-salmonids in the offshore region and abundance of salmon, the interactions caused by that management may be amenable to modification. The BIOP calls for investigation by BPA of effects on salmon of production of hatchery fish (#13.h., p. 121).

Methods
A long-term investigation of ecology of salmon in offshore marine environments is needed. It should include systematic sampling of physical and biological oceanographic factors, including salinity, temperature, currents, nutrient availability, and invertebrate densities in the water column. In addition, researchers should systematically sample fish populations, probably with purse seines or surface trawls, obtaining data on distributions, population structure, growth, and food habits. Such data would permit investigators to better understand fluctuations in marine survival of salmon and the role of enhancement of stocks. The early years of research in this project will necessarily be descriptive and correlative. While experimental modification of the environment is difficult, apart from modifications in numbers of smolts recruited to the sea from various enhancement programs, and certain aspects of fishery management, it is imperative for managers to better understand the offshore region and its influence upon salmon production. Recent papers have noted the importance of interdecadal cycles in marine productivity.

Initial phases of this study should examine broad-scale ocean phenomena. Early phases would lead to correlative, retrospective analysis of relationships. At least temperature, salinity, plankton, and chlorophyll-a obtained in various investigations would be examined. Recent Canadian papers have demonstrated the value of this type of work in providing clues for modeling fish behavior and for assessing carrying capacity issues.

Brief schedule of activities

Biological need

Critical uncertainties

Summary of expected outcome

Dependencies/opportunities for cooperation

Risks

Monitoring activity

Section 3. Budget

Data shown are the total of expense and capital obligations by fiscal year. Obligations for any given year may not equal actual expenditures or accruals within the year, due to carryover, pre-funding, capitalization and difference between operating year and BPA fiscal year.

Historic costsFY 1996 budget data*Current and future funding needs
(none) New project - no FY96 data available 1997: 1,000,000
1998: 1,000,000
1999: 1,000,000
2000: 1,000,000
2001: 1,000,000

* For most projects, Authorized is the amount recommended by CBFWA and the Council. Planned is amount currently allocated. Contracted is the amount obligated to date of printout.

Funding recommendations

CBFWA funding review group   System Policy

Recommendation    Tier 2 - fund when funds available

Recommended funding level   $1,000,000