BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1997 Proposal

Section 1. Administrative
Section 2. Narrative
Section 3. Budget

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Administrative

Title of project
An Automated Fish Marking and Tagging System

BPA project number   9207300

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
WDFW

Sponsor type   WA-State/Local Agency

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameLee Blankenship
 Mailing addressWashington Department of Fisheries
600 Capitol Way N.
Olympia, WA 98501-1091
 Phone206/902-2748

BPA technical contact   Tom Morse, EWN 503/230-3694

Biological opinion ID   NMFS BO RPA

NWPPC Program number   8.4C.3

Short description
Develop an automated mass-marking technique for juvenile salmonids that removes adipose fin and/or applies coded-wire tag without human handling or anesthetic.

Project start year   1992    End year   1997

Start of operation and/or maintenance   

Project development phase   Planning

Section 2. Narrative

Related projects
None

Project history
This project was intiated in 1992 to investigate the feasibility of a laser marking technique. The lazer marks are not retained. Ancellary actions have determnine that it is feasible to develop a automated marking machine, using existing technology, to mark large numbers of juvenile salmonids without handling or anesthetizing the fish. The smolts swim into the machine are orientated into a position that allows the adapose fin to be "read" and excised using a clipping devise. This facility can also inject a coded wire tag or adminster medicine into the fish. Since these actions are controlled by a computer they can be affected in any combination (e.g. Fin clip only, coded wire tag only, medicine only, Fin Clip and coded wire tag, etc.). Estimated cost of devloping and testing this machine is 1.34 million (this does not include the capability of injecting medicine). Time to delivery is estimated to be 16 months (December 1996). The machine, which would require two persons to operate, would be capable of processing 50,000 smolts in a eight hour shift. The machine would be capable of processing salmonids ranging in size of 60mm to 150mm. Smolts would be graded by size prior to processing.

Biological results achieved

Annual reports and technical papers
Annual reports are available.

Management implications
The ability to mark all hatchery fish will allow studies to be performed on amount and effect of hatchery straying. An estimated savings of 33 percent for adipose clip/coded-wire tag over the present manual operation will allow funds to be reprioritized to other projects. Without a machine like this it would not be physically possible to mark all of the Columbia River Basin hatchery chinook production.

Specific measureable objectives
Machine will adipose clip and/or coded-wire tag salmonids ranging in size from 60 mm to 150 mm at the rate of 2/second or 50,000/8 hour shift without use of anesthetic or individual handling by humans.

Testable hypothesis
Juvenile salmonids exiting mass marking machine are missing adipose fin and contain a coded-wire tag in the cartilage area of the snout. Fish are not scaled or overly stressed by activities.

Underlying assumptions or critical constraints
A mass-marking machine will have been built and tested under laboratory conditions and ready for field testing. This assumption is presently on schedule (2/96).

Methods
The need to mark all juvenile hatchery salmon within the Columbia River Basin with a mark that is relatively inexpensive, readily conspicuous to laymen and scientists throughout the life of the fish without an appreciable increase in mortality has been identified and recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council, ESA Recovery Plan, and state/federal/tribal fishery managers. Automated mass marking will allow measurement of hatchery straying and possible adverse effects of hatchery fish on wild fish populations.

Brief schedule of activities
Mass marking devise will be field tested under actual conditions at WDFW hatchery facilities. Results will be monitored and adjustments, redesign, modifications, etc. to the prototype machine will be made accordingly so that machine can be manufactured and made available to public.

Biological need
The need to mark all juvenile hatchery salmon within the Columbia River Basin with a mark that is relatively inexpensive, readily conspicuous to laymen and scientists throughout the life of the fish without an appreciable increase in mortality has been identified and recommended by the Northwest Power Planning Council, ESA Recovery Plana, and state/federal/tribal fishery managers. Automated mass marking will allow measurement of hatchery straying and possible adverse effects of hatchery fish on wild fish populations.

Critical uncertainties
A proof of concept mass marking prototype machine was built with previous funding. Each critical a component performed its function as an individual component. The individual components were manually operated by closing valves, turning switches, etc. The uncertainty is whether the components cant be synchronized and operated by a computer.

Summary of expected outcome
A machine that can adipose clip and/or coded-wire tag salmonids ranging in size from 50-150mm without individual human handling or anesthetic without undue stress to the fish. The throughput is expected to be 2 fish/second or 50,000 fish in an 8 hour shift requiring two operators. Cost savings when compared to the present system of manually marking are expected to be 37 percent for adipose clipping and 33 percent for adipose/coded-wire tagging.

Dependencies/opportunities for cooperation
None recognized.

Risks
None recognized.

Monitoring activity
Machine will be put into production marking/tagging operations currently being performed by WDFW and output measure along with quality control measurements.

Section 3. Budget

Data shown are the total of expense and capital obligations by fiscal year. Obligations for any given year may not equal actual expenditures or accruals within the year, due to carryover, pre-funding, capitalization and difference between operating year and BPA fiscal year.

Historic costsFY 1996 budget data*Current and future funding needs
1992: 248,845
1993: 320,326
1994: 160,000
1995: 949,747
Obligation: 0
Authorized: 0
Planned: 0
1997: 200,000

* For most projects, Authorized is the amount recommended by CBFWA and the Council. Planned is amount currently allocated. Contracted is the amount obligated to date of printout.

Funding recommendations

CBFWA funding review group   System Policy

Recommendation    Tier 1 - fund

Recommended funding level   $200,000

BPA 1997 authorized budget (approved start-of-year budget)   $200,000