BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1998 Proposal

Section 1. Summary
Section 2. Goals
Section 3. Background
Section 4. Purpose and methods
Section 5. Planned activities
Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation
Section 7. Relationships
Section 8. Costs and FTE

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Summary

Title of project
Dworshak Impacts/M&E & Bio-Int Rule Curves

BPA project number   8740700

Short description
Gather thermal/physical/chemical data, primary productivity, zooplankton and benthic data for M&E of impacts from Dworshak operations and use these data to formulate biological/integrated rule curves.

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
Nez Perce Tribe

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameDavid P. Statler, Director of Resident Fisheries
 Mailing address3404 Highway 12
Orofino, ID 83544
 Phone208/476-7417
 Emailstatlerd@clearwater.net
   

Sub-contractors
EcoAnalysts, Moscow, ID, for aquatic macroinvertebrate analysis, Washington State Water Research Center, Pullman, WA, or AquaID for zooplankton analysis.

Section 2. Goals

General
Supports a healthy Columbia basin; maintains biological diversity; increases run sizes or populations; provides needed habitat protection

Target stockLife stageMgmt code (see below)
Bull trout  
Westslope cutthroat trout  
Kokanee  
Smallmouth bass  

 
Affected stockBenefit or detriment
Largemouth bassBeneficial
Black crappieBeneficial

Section 3. Background

Stream area affected

Stream name   North Fork Clearwater River (Dworshak Reservoir)
Stream miles affected   53.6
Hydro project   Dworshak Dam and Reservoir, ID
Subbasin   Clearwater
Land ownership   public
Acres affected   17,090
Habitat types   Reservoir

History
The Corps of Engineers supplied funding for the Washington Water Research Center, Pullman, WA, to conduct primary productivity, zooplankton and water quality studies during FY 1995. The primary productivity and water quality work was a continuation of work funded by BPA under 8770700 in FY 1993 and 1994. Project 9740700 plans to continue to provide equipment and personnel support for these activities. Biological information was used extensively in the BPA/USACE/BOR System Operation Review (Final November 1995). The SOR provided a broad-based, multidisciplinary approach to evaluating over 90 alternative operation strategies for the FCRPS. Project data and analysis for the Resident Fish Appendix of the SOR EIS was a major non-biological product that was a project focus pre-1996.

Biological results achieved
As a result of recommendations in a 1993 project report prepared jointly by the Nez Perce Tribe and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the stocking of rainbow trout in Dworshak Reservoir for resident fish mitigation has been limited pending investigation of rainbow trout-cutthroat trout hybridization. Based on project studies, the 12-inch minimum size limit for smallmouth bass was withdrawn, thereby expanding harvest opportunities in Dworshak Reservoir for this popular self-sustaining non-native species.

Project reports and papers
Statler, D.P. 1988, 1989, 1990. Dworshak Investigations: trout, bass and forage species. Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management, Annual Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract DE-AI79-87BP35165, Project 87-407, Portland, OR.
Juul, S.T.J, and M.A. Hagerman. 1993. Primary productivity evaluation of Dworshak Reservoir: first interim report. Prepared for the Nez Perce Tribe, WSU Project Number 11W-3815-2857, Pullman, WA.
Juul, S.T.J. 1996. A limnological reevaluation of Dwoshak Reservoir, Idaho. A Progress Report Prepared for the Nez Perce Tribe and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, WSU Project Numbers 11W-3815-2857 and 11W-3998-2628, Pullman, WA.
Maiolie, M.A., D.P. Statler, and S. Elam. 1993. Dworshak Dam impact assessment and fishery investigation and trout, bass, and forage species. Final Report. Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR.

Adaptive management implications
Knowledge gained from this program will aid in the adaptive management for consideration of reservoir fish resource needs in conjunction with downstream needs for anadromous fish, flood control and power production. Biological information generated from this project data was used to evaluate over 90 operation startegies for the FCRPS as part of the SOR. These analyses indicated that operational criteria resulting in relatively stable pool levels are most conducive to maintaining productivity of the Dworshak Reservoir ecosystem. This information has been and is being applied within the TMT process established as part of the NMFS 1995 Biological Opinion on operation of the FCRPS. It can be concluded that, within the broader program management framework, biological information from thjis project has increased the awareness and sensitivity of the TMT process to resident fishery resources.

Section 4. Purpose and methods

Specific measureable objectives
The project intends to achieve: conservation/enhancement of baseline (yet to be determined) primary productivity, zooplankton productivity and benthic productivity; rearing habitat and food resources for the conservation of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout within the North Fork Clearwater Basin; a stable population of kokanee at 30-50 age-2 kokanee/hectare; successful natural reproduction of smallmouth bass; a target PSD of 30 and relative weight of 100 for smallmouth bass.

Critical uncertainties
Biological/integrated rule curve development through data collection assumes that changes in primary and secondary production attributed to dam operations can be isolated and detected. A risk is that, once identified, the biological/inregrated rule curves are not implemented.

Biological need
The underlying need for this project is to maintain the productive health of Dworshak Reservoir for resident fish while serving other multi-purpose needs, such as flood control, power production and flow augmentation for anadromous fish. The bottom line is to identify an operational strategy for Dworshak Dam to mimic the downstream natural hydrograph (beneficial to endangered Snake River salmon spawning, rearing and migration) and maintain a productive reservoir environment for resident fish, including native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. It is assumed that the ecosystem health, diversity and productivity of Dworshak Reservoir has been reduced due to severe seasonal reservoir drawdowns, and that these parameters will improve with less drastic pool fluctuations.

Hypothesis to be tested
Operations of Dworshak Dam influences primary productivity.Operations of Dworshak Dam influences zooplankton abundance. Operations of Dworshak Dam influences abundance of benthos.

Alternative approaches
As stated in NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program amendment application 95-2/0042, dated January 25, 1995, there is no known alternative means to achieve the project biological objectives.

Justification for planning
NA

Methods
1) Measurement of primary productivity, zooplankton, benthos, nutrients, temperature, and oxygen monthly at six reservoir stations to capture longitudinal variations. Monitor phytoplankton, zooplankton and nutrients below Dworshak Dam and relate to operations. Methods: primary production via 14C liquid scintillation; zooplankton via 130-150 micron mesh (size 10) with pygmy flow meter; benthos via 23 X 23 cm Ponar grab sampler with boom/electric winch; temperature/oxygen via YSI Model 50B meter; nutrients via Standard Methods. Water transportation via 22-foot Weldcraft welded aluminum boat with 150 hp Mercury outboard.
2) Computer algorithms for model simulations.
3) Primary fish species affected: bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee and smallmouth bass.

Section 5. Planned activities

Phase PlanningStart 1/97 End 12/99Subcontractor partial
Data summary for application of accumulated data to biological/integrated rule curve development. Biological/integrated rule curve formulation. Project activities for 1998-2001 will be reduced to focusing on monitoring at one in-reservoir site in the Dworshak Reservoir forebay and one site below Dworshak Dam.

Constraints or factors that may cause schedule or budget changes
The schedule may be influenced by the amount of effort required to caliabrate the rule curve modeling effort to compensate for unforeseen influences on reservoir dynamics. Additional data needs for calibration or other purposes may extend the planning phase. The budget may be influenced by inflation of costs of goods and services and the costs of modeling subcontractors. Listing of weak native stocks (e.g., bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout) would increase ESA coordination costs and could increase the cost of fish sampling methodologies.

Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation

SUMMARY OF EXPECTED OUTCOMES

Expected performance of target population or quality change in land area affected
Application of a biological/integrated rule curve for Dworshak Dam and Reservoir that will result in conservation/enhancement of baseline (yet to be determined) primary productivity, zooplankton productivity and benthic productivity; rearing habitat and food resources for the conservation of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout within the North Fork Clearwater Basin; a stable population of kokanee at 30-50 age-2 kokanee/hectare; successful natural reproduction of smallmouth bass; a target PSD of 30 and relative weight of 100 for smallmouth bass.
2) Impact assessment model to simulate biological impacts associated with alternative operations.

Present utilization and convservation potential of target population or area
State of Idaho fishing regulations presently prohibit harvest of bull trout in Dworshak Reservoir. Present harvest of westslope cutthroat trout is less than 100 fish.

Assumed historic status of utilization and conservation potential
NA. Dworshak Reservoir did not exist in an historic sense.

Long term expected utilization and conservation potential for target population or habitat
The long-term desired utilization potential for self-sustaining bull trout is 500-1,000 fish annually for Dworshak Reservoir proper. The long-term conservation potential for catch and release fishing is .5-.75 fish/hr. The long-term desired utilization potential for a supplemented westslope cutthroat trout fishery is >20,000 fish annually. A long-term conservation target for catch and release fishing is 1.0 fish per hour for self-sustaining native westslope cutthroat trout.

Contribution toward long-term goal
Rearing habitat and food resources to sustain target populations of bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee and smallmouth bass.

Indirect biological or environmental changes
Additional food for wildlife (e.g., bald eagles, osprey, black bear, otter) that directly utilize fish from Dworshak Reservoir. Reduced erosion of the denuded Dworshak Reservoir shoreline. Reestablishment of the native redside shiner as an important forage species. A normative hydrograph to benefit spawning, rearing and migrating endangered salmon. Fuller summer pools for recreationists and log transportation.

Physical products
17,090 acres of reservoir habitat enhanced

Environmental attributes affected by the project
Dam discharges (flow), downstream water temperature, pool level, access to campsites around Dworshak Reservoir.

Changes assumed or expected for affected environmental attributes
Naturalized dam discharges (with less ramping) ,less downstream water temperature fluctuation, more stable pool level, better access to campsites around Dworshak Reservoir.

Measure of attribute changes
17,090 acres of reservoir habitat enhanced

Assessment of effects on project outcomes of critical uncertainty
Monitoring and evaluation of identified quantified biological objectives.

Information products
Monitoring and evalution of reservoir primary productivity, secondary productivity (zooplankton and benthos), smallmouth bass relative weights/PSD, creel survey, relative abundance assessments of target populations.

Coordination outcomes
Coordinate with FCRPS management entities (FPAC, TMT, IT, ECOM) in pre-season, in-season, and post-season analyses and approaches relative to Dworshak Reservoir operations. Coordinate with sate, federal and tribal resident fish managers in approaches to rebuild weak native stocks (e.g., bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout).

MONITORING APPROACH
The region should measure the projectís biological and environmental outcomes via pre- and post-rule curve monitoring and analyzing trends of measured parameters. Monitor phytoplankton, zooplankton and nutrients below Dworshak Dam and relate to operations. Monitoring and evalution of reservoir primary productivity, secondary productivity (zooplankton and benthos), smallmouth bass relative weights/PSD, creel survey, relative abundance assessments of target populations. Methods: primary production via 14C liquid scintillation; zooplankton via 130-150 micron mesh (size 10) with pygmy flow meter; benthos via 23 X 23 cm Ponar grab sampler with boom/electric winch; temperature/oxygen via YSI Model 50B meter; nutrients via Standard Methods. Relative fish abundances via variable mesh experimental gill nets. Water transportation via 22-foot Weldcraft welded aluminum boat with 150 hp Mercury outboard.
2) Computer algorithms for model simulations.
3) Primary fish species affected: bull trout, westslope cutthroat trout, kokanee and smallmouth bass.

Provisions to monitor population status or habitat quality
Personnel, basic equipment, and subcontracting expertise are in place to conduct fish population and habitat monitoring. as described (Item 102) above.

Data analysis and evaluation
Monitored parameters will be evaluated with reference to modeled (predicted) outcomes and trend analysis, including analysis relative to fishery and fish population data collected since 1972.

Information feed back to management decisions
Timely feed back to management decisions will occur via ongoing fora for FCRPS operations (i.e., FPAC, TMT, IT, EXCOM).

Critical uncertainties affecting project's outcomes
Via monitoring and evaluation activities, as described above (Item 102).

Evaluation
Biological/integrated rule curve formulation, rule curve implementation, substantive and influential participation in the FCRPS management process (FPAC, TMT, IT, EXCOM), positive trend in monitor/evaluation parameters (primary production, secondary production, fish populations, etc.), reduced entrainment of zooplankton.

Incorporating new information regarding uncertainties
Via monitoring and evaluation activities, as described above (Item 102), and appropriate modification oif these activities.

Increasing public awareness of F&W activities
Personal contact with recreationists at Dworshak Reservoir is common. Interaction with the public on these occasions, relative to project activities, increases public awareness. Presentations to professional (AFS) and local organizations (i.e., Kiwanis, Rotarians, etc.) have also been used to increase public awareness.

Section 7. Relationships

Related BPA projectRelationship
8709900 Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment This IDFG sponsored project involves investigation of kokanee entrainment losses relative to Dworshak operations. Kokanee entrainment and reservoir habitat productivity are both important components of Dworshak fishery management, and both are affected by operations.
9501600 Genetic Inventory Westslope Cutthroat Trout This NPT sponsored project addresses the conservation of native westslope cutthroat trout genetics in the North Fork Clearwater Basin, and its relationship to Dworshak Reservoir fish stocking strategies.
Related non-BPA projectRelationship
Dworshak Resident Fish Mitigation Review/USACEThe USACE is funding the Universityof Idaho to review the efficacy of current resident fish mitigation (rainbow trout stocking) funded by the USACE pursuant to the original USFWS Coordination Act Report.

Opportunities for cooperation
The Northwest Power Planning Council must approve adoption of the rule curve for implementation. The Corps of Engineers and the Bonneville Power Administration would need to follow the Council's decision. The National Marine Fisheries Service would need to apply adaptive management principles in its recovery efforts for endangered Snake River chinook and sockeye salmon. Modifications to the original legislative authorization for Dworshak Dam and Reservoir may need to be modified.

Section 8. Costs and FTE

1997 Planned  $143,392

Future funding needs   Past obligations (incl. 1997 if done)
FY$ Need% Plan % Implement% O and M
1998175,000 100%   
1999200,000 100%   
2000200,000 100%   
2001180,000 100%   
2002175,000 100%   
 
FYObligated
1987111,517
1988109,783
1989145,829
1990106,593
1994159,969
199510,000
1996172,554
1997143,392
Total959,637

Other non-financial supporters
Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Idaho Department of Fish & Game, Corps of Engineers, Washington State Water Research Center

Longer term costs   200,000


Continued implementation, including M&E.

FY97 overhead percent   29.5%

How does percentage apply to direct costs
Applies to Personnel and Operating Costs only.

Subcontractor FTE   .2

Supplemental resident fish evaluation factors
This project is within an area blocked by a federally operated dam (Dworshak Dam - USACE), mitigates for resident losses, and addresses weak stocks of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Biological objectives have been identified via the CBFWA MYIP process.