BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1998 Proposal

Section 1. Summary
Section 2. Goals
Section 3. Background
Section 4. Purpose and methods
Section 5. Planned activities
Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation
Section 7. Relationships
Section 8. Costs and FTE

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Summary

Title of project
Idaho Department of Fish and Game Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program

BPA project number   9107200

Short description
Establish captive broodstocks of Redfish Lake sockeye salmon. Spawn to produce progeny for release to Redfish and other Stanley Basin lakes. Monitor nursery populations, evaluate smolt outmigration by release strategy and broodstock lineage. Avoid species extinction and begin rebuilding natural production.

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameSteve Huffaker/Al Van Vooren, Fisheries Chief / Fisheries Research Manager
 Mailing addressIdaho Department of Fish and Game. 600 S. Walnut St. -- P.O. Box 25
Boise, ID 83707
 Phone208/334-3791
 Emailshuffaker@idfg.st.id.us
   

Sub-contractors
N/A

Section 2. Goals

General
Supports a healthy Columbia basin; maintains biological diversity; maintains genetic integrity; increases run sizes or populations; provides needed habitat protection

Target stockLife stageMgmt code (see below)
SockeyeAdultS, A, N, L, W
SockeyePre-smolts, smoltsS, A, N, L, W

 
Affected stockBenefit or detriment
Stanley Basin lake fish communities, including bull trout stocksBeneficial

Section 3. Background

Stream area affected

Stream name   Upper Salmon River, Redfish Lake Creek, Pettit Lake Creek, Alturas Lake Creek
Hydro project   N/A -- not caused by particular HEP
Subbasin   Snake River
Habitat types   N/A -- fish project

History
Broodstocks have been established from Redfish Lake outmigrant smolts (1991, 1992, and 1993), from returning anadromous adults (1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1996), and from Redfish Lake residual sockeye (1992, 1993). Genetically defined progeny (age 0 pre-smolts) were released to Redfish Lake in 1994 (N = 12,000) 1995 (N = 84,000), and 1996 (N = 103,000) and to Pettit Lake in 1995 (N = 8,500). Age 1 smolts were released to Redfish Lake Creek in 1995 (N = 3,500) and 1996 (N = 11,000). Adult broodstock sockeye were released to Redfish Lake to volitionally spawn in 1993, 1994, and 1996. Supplementation using all of the above release options will continue in the future. Projected juvenile supplementation for 1997 is approximately 350,000. Supplementation is expected to remain comparatively high through 1999. Hatchery-produced anadromous adults are expected to begin returning to the program in 1997. Beyond broodstock needs, anadromous adults will be counted past the adult weir on Redfish Lake Creek to spawn volitionally. Evaluation of smolt outmigration success by release strategy and broodstock lineage began in 1995.

Biological results achieved
1991 to Present - Captive broodstocks developed from returning anadromous adults, Redfish Lake outmigrants, and Redfish Lake residual sockeye salmon.
1993 -Twenty-four adult broodstock sockeye salmon released to spawn volitionally in Redfish Lake. Few incidences of volitional spawning observed.
1994 -Approximately 12,000 brood year 1993 sockeye salmon juveniles released to Redfish Lake primarily from net pens. Eggs shared with NMFS. Sixty-five adult broodstock sockeye salmon released to spawn volitionally in Redfish Lake. Few incidences of volitional spawning observed.
1995 -Approximately 84,000 brood year 1994 sockeye salmon juveniles released to Redfish Lake from three release strategies. Approximately 3,500 age 1 sockeye salmon released to Redfish Lake Creek. Approximately 8,500 sockeye salmon juveniles released to Pettit Lake. Eggs shared with NMFS. A portion of the 1995 supplementation resulted from eggs brought from NMFS to Eagle Hatchery for rearing. Hatchery-produced outmigration from 1994 pre-smolts and 1995 smolt releases estimated at approximately 4,000 fish (outmigration year 1995).
1996 -Approximately 2,600 brood year 1995 progeny released to Redfish Lake from net pens. Approximately 11,000 brood year 1994 progeny (age 1 smolts) released to Redfish Lake Creek. Hatchery-produced outmigration from 1995 pre-smolt and 1996 smolt releases estimated at approximately 30,000 fish (outmigration year 1996).
1997 -Approximately 366,000 brood year 1996 juvenile sockeye salmon presently rearing at IDFG, NMFS, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) facilities for pre-smolt and smolt releases in 1997 and 1998. Approximately 105,000 eyed-eggs planted in egg boxes in Redfish Lake in 1996 to produce 1997 outmigrants. One hundred-twenty adult broodstock sockeye planted in Redfish Lake in 1996 to produce 1997 outmigrants. A minimum of 30 redd locations were observed from this activity.
Sockeye/kokanee population, density, and biomass data have been collected on four Stanley Basin lakes since 1991. These data are incorporated with broodstock production estimates to develop lake carrying capacity guidelines. Smolt outmigration has been estimated for Redfish Lake and for the upper Salmon River since 1991. Evaluations of outmigration success by release strategy and broodstock lineage began in 1995 and continue to provide guidance to the program. Environmental life of wild and broodstock 0. nerka using otolith microchemistry has been researched since 1992. These data have been used to demonstrate that both residual and anadromous forms of O. nerka produce progeny that posses the ability to assume either life history direction.

Project reports and papers
CAPTIVE BROODSTOCK
1992 Annual Report (DE-Bl79-91BP21065-1)
1993 Annual Report (DE-Bl79-91BP21065-2)
1994 Annual Report (DE-Bl79-91BP21065-3)
1995 Annual Report (DE-Bl79-91BP21065-4, in review)
Flagg, T.A., C.V.W. Manhken, and KA. Johnson. 1995. Captive broodstocks for recovery of Snake River sockeye salmon. American Fisheries Society Symposium, 15:81-90.
Siri, P., and K. Johnson. 1995. Maturation and reproduction in salmonid captive breeding programs. Aquaculture, 135: 217-218.
EVALUATION RESEARCH
1993 Annual Report (DE-BI79-91BP21065, November 1993)
1995 Annual Report (DE-Bl79-91BP21065, August 1994)
1996 Annual Report (DE-B179-91BP21065, in review).

Adaptive management implications
This project develops baseline population and outmigration data for Snake River sockeye salmon critical to the development of management options for this species. Project captive broodstock and outmigration evaluation efforts are now guiding species adaptive management in the state of Idaho. Information collected from past broodstock experiences and from outmigration evaluations are incorporated as frequently as possible to improve the efficiency and success of the program. Sockeye salmon captive broodstock and rearing methods developed on this project will also provide a technical foundation for future endangered species recovery in the pacific northwest. One program activity has directly affected resident fisheries management through the re-opening of a kokanee fishing season on Redfish Lake. The fishery was reinstituted in 1995 to provide sport fishing opportunity and to partially control the kokanee population that directly competes with supplemented sockeye salmon for rearing space and food resources. To date, broodstock production stands in excess of one-half million juvenile sockeye salmon. This production contributes to program species recovery goals and in the near term, successfully addresses the immediate threat of species extinction that prompted Federal ESA listing in 1991.

Section 4. Purpose and methods

Specific measureable objectives
1. Determine survival, maturation success, age-at-maturity, sex ratio, and gamete quality for eight sockeye salmon broodstocks in captivity.
2. Produce genetically defined progeny for supplementation to Redfish Lake and other Stanley Basin lakes and creeks using different release strategies.
3. Determine if time on chilled water for broodstock adults reared at Eagle Hatchery affects gamete quality, fertilization rates, and anomalies in progeny. Compare with NMFS rearing results.
4. Compare age-at-maturity, maturation rate, gamete quality, and performance for brood year 1994 broodstocks reared at two growth rates.
5. Establish sperm cryopreservation at Eagle Hatchery and compare results with University of Idaho and Washington State University.
6. Examine whether classical levels for minimum population number will prevent the ability of broodstocks established in this program to recover Snake River sockeye salmon.
7. Develop sound 0. nerka population, density, and biomass trend data for Stanley Basin sockeye salmon and kokanee nursery lakes. Compare with Shoshone-Bannock Tribe hydroacoustic-based estimates to develop conservative carrying capacity guidelines.
8. Determine whether broodstock supplementation progeny are contributing to recovery efforts. Evaluate outmigration success relative to release strategy and broodstock lineage.
9. Determine whether broodstock adults released to spawn volitionally in Redfish Lake are contributing to recovery efforts. Evaluate spawning success relative to broodstock lineage.
10. Determine the origin of Stanley Basin 0. nerka.

Critical uncertainties
Outmigration success of broodstock-produced progeny and smolt-to-adult return rates may not be adequate to achieve NMFS draft recovery goals. The immediate goal of the project (to prevent species extinction) is not at risk as it relates to the above uncertainty.An additional risk is that broodstock supplementation progeny released to Stanley Basin lakes will contribute to the over consumption of available zooplankton resources. One additional risk is that limited founding genetics to the broodstock program will result in higher than desirable rates of genetic anomalies in progeny and poor performance by release groups.

Biological need
Precipitous declines in Snake River sockeye salmon populations lead to their Federal listing as endangered in 1991 (Redfish Lake ESU). Captive broodstock efforts represent the only immediate method of preserving this species while long term recovery solutions are sought. Since 1991, all returning anadromous adult sockeye salmon, several hundred Redfish Lake outmigrants (from 1991 - 1993), and several residual sockeye salmon adults (from 1992 and 1993) have been captured and used to establish captive broodstocks. Broodstock program progeny have been used to supplement natural production since 1994. As this stock is operating at less than replacement levels, the above activities focus on the survival of all life stages. Recovery depends on the performance of program-produced fish and on improvements in survival through the migratory corridor (better smolt-to-adult survival).

Hypothesis to be tested
HO1 Survival, maturation rate, age-at-maturity, sex ratio, and gamete quality will not differ significantly for eight, genetically distinct broodstocks.
HO2 Adults held on chilled water (10C) approximately six months prior to spawning will exhibit statistically indifferent gamete quality, fertilization rates, and percent anomaly rates from broodstock adults held on chilled water (10C) approximately ten months prior to spawning and from broodstock adults reared on constant I0C water by NMFS.
HO3 Growth rate (accelerated vs. retarded) for brood year 1994 broodstocks will not affect age-at maturity, maturation rate, gamete quality, or performance.
HO4 Sperm cryopreserved at Eagle Hatchery will fertilize kokanee eggs at the same rate as sperm cryopreserved at the University of Idaho and Washington State University.
HO5 Survival and growth of overwintering supplementation progeny in Redfish Lake will be significantly higher in years following whole lake fertilization.
HO6 Post-release growth and survival of Redfish Lake broodstock progeny will not differ significantly as a function of release strategy or broodstock lineage.
HO7 Outmigration success of Redfish Lake broodstock progeny to Redfish Lake Creek weir will not differ significantly as a function of broodstock lineage or release strategy.
HO8 Cumulative unique, first observation interrogations of broodstock progeny between Lower Granite and McNary dams will not differ significantly as a function of release strategy or broodstock lineage.
HO9 Survival and spawning success of adult broodstock 0. nerka released to volitionally spawn in Redfish Lake will not differ significantly as a function of broodstock lineage.
HO10 Otolith microchemistry strontium/calcium ratios can be used to identify environmental life history of wild and broodstock 0. nerka.

Alternative approaches
N/A

Justification for planning
N/A

Methods
Broodstock fish history is tracked using PIT tags. Eggs produced at spawning are divided into as many as six lots (per female) and fertilized with sperm from multiple males. Eggs are incubated by lot at different water temperatures to yield lineage-specific size groups for release under different strategies. All-broodstock progeny destined for release are adipose fin-clipped. Experimental design focuses on determining whether broodstock lineage or release strategy are critical to the outmigration success of broodstock program supplementation 0. nerka released as juveniles to Stanley Basin waters. Through adaptive management, experimental results are incorporated in the program to increase success. Stanley Basin 0. nerka populations have been monitored by midwater trawl and dual beam hydroacoustics since 1991. These data provide the background for interpreting sockeye/kokanee population stability and whole lake fertilization effectiveness (Redfish Lake only). Smolt outmigration from Redfish and Alturas lakes has been monitored since 1991. Pettit Lake outmigration monitoring began in 1996. Data collected at outmigrant weirs and mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams is used to compare outmigration success of broodstock supplementation progeny by broodstock lineage and release strategy. Non-parametric statistics are used to compare outmigration success of broodstock supplementation progeny. A-priori sample size calculations were conducted to achieve evaluation group sizes consistent with an 80% level of Power in the event that we fail to reject the null Hypothesis of equal outmigration performance (by release strategy or lineage). Parametric statistics are used to compare 0. nerka growth and size under pre- and post-fertilization conditions.

Section 5. Planned activities

Phase PlanningStart 6/91 11/96 End 9/98Subcontractor
IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery facility development and improvements. FY 98 ongoing work to include planning process. IDFG Sawtooth Hatchery facility development and improvements. FY98 ongoing work to include planning process. Program planning related to spawning matrix development, broodstock and supplementation relationships and strategies, evaluation process (adaptively managed and includes annual planning).
Phase ImplementationStart 6/91 End 9/98Subcontractor
Implementation of planning to include broodstock maturation and spawning, incubation and rearing, continued broodstock and production culture. Implement supplementation, lake population monitoring, outmigrant monitoring and evaluation, adult trapping, agency crossover, task assistance, and resource sharing. Facility modifications and improvements.
Phase O&MStart 6/91 End 9/98Subcontractor
Activities to include 1) broodstock maturation and spawning, incubation and rearing, broodstock and production culture, 2) Lake and creek supplementation, 3) lake population monitoring, 4) outmigrant and adult monitoring and evaluation, 5) facility improvements, 6) agency crossover, 7) reporting. Facility modifications and improvements.
Project completion date   Ongoing, ESA recovery actions and timelines are based on delisting criteria and not on date.

Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation

SUMMARY OF EXPECTED OUTCOMES

Expected performance of target population or quality change in land area affected
The delisting criteria for Snake River sockeye salmon as set forth in the Proposed Recovery Plan For Snake River Salmon (NMFS 1995) are to sustain naturally produced adult escapement in three Stanley Basin lakes (1,000 adults to Redfish Lake and 500 adults back to two additional lakes, each). Without substantive change in smolt-to-adult return rates (SAR), this goal is not attainable. At the present SAR, we anticipate adult escapement from hatchery-produced outmigrants to fall considerably short of the delisting criteria. Factors beyond our control impact SAR and ultimately target population performance (normative river management needs to be pursued). However, the immediate project goal of avoiding species extinction is and will continue to be met as long as we maintain the program. Several years of critical population genetics have been channeled back to Stanley Basin waters through program supplementation. Adults should begin to return to the program in 1997. At the present time, we anticipate adding a third supplementation lake to the program in 1997. We anticipate that each lake will be managed near carrying capacity (within a calculated margin of safety) for the production of juvenile sockeye salmon. A three-lake nursery policy is consistent with the NMFS draft recovery plan. Essentially, everything that can be done at the nursery lake - juvenile production end of the life cycle is being done.

Present utilization and convservation potential of target population or area
IDFG's ultimate project goal is to rebuild self-sustaining populations AND provide for some managed level of sport and treaty harvest. Without improvements in species SAR, this not a near-term expectation. This goal becomes very realistic, however as SAR's improve.

Assumed historic status of utilization and conservation potential
Only anecdotal information exists for Stanley Basin sockeye salmon prior to the 1950's. One early account from the late 1800's described the Sockeye Beach area of Redfish Lake in terms of "turning red" from the numbers of spawning sockeye salmon. A separate account from the same time period referenced plans to build a cannery on the shore of Redfish Lake. In the 1950's and early 1960's adult escapement to Redfish Lake was monitored. The peak adult return occurred in 1955 when 4,360 adult sockeye salmon were counted over a weir into Redfish Lake. The Idaho State record sockeye salmon was caught as recently as 1970 (8/8/70, 5lbs, Redfish Lake).

Long term expected utilization and conservation potential for target population or habitat
To provide a managed level of sport and treaty harvest opportunity.

Contribution toward long-term goal
Maintain Snake River sockeye salmon and avoid species extinction. Rescue several critical years of genetics through broodstock techniques and supplementation efforts. Provide release strategy and lineage-specific outmigration evaluation information critical to the continued success of the program. Rebuild some level of naturally reproducing populations in three Stanley Basin nursery lakes. Project contributions will increase as SAR's increase.

Indirect biological or environmental changes
N/A Discussed as "critical uncertainties" above.

Physical products
Population genetics preserved for eight captive broodstocks (progeny supplemented to Stanley Basin waters). In excess of 18,000 juvenile supplementation fish PIT-tagged for evaluation purposes (includes brood year 1996 production). In excess of 500,000 eyed-eggs and juvenile sockeye salmon produced to date for supplementation. Documented volitional spawning of adult broodstock releases in Redfish Lake. Hatchery-produced adult sockeye salmon should begin returning to the program in 1997.

Environmental attributes affected by the project
N/A No attributes affected.

Changes assumed or expected for affected environmental attributes
N/A

Measure of attribute changes
N/A

Assessment of effects on project outcomes of critical uncertainty
Uncertainty: Outmigration success of broodstock-produced progeny and smolt-to-adult return rates may not be adequate to achieve NMFS draft recovery goals.
Assessment: Program evaluations track outmigration by lineage and release strategy and provide estimates of outmigration success. Smolt-to-adult return data will be generated as hatchery-produced adults begin returning to the program in 1997.
Uncertainty: An additional risk is that broodstock supplementation progeny released to Stanley Basin lakes will contribute to the over consumption of available food resources.
Assessment: Develop and adhere to carrying capacity guidelines for Stanley Basin lakes. Conduct comprehensive population monitoring. Conduct whole lake fertilization of the principal supplementation lakes. Conduct a partial kokanee control program in Redfish Lake.
Uncertainty: One additional risk is that limited founding genetics to the broodstock program will result in higher than desirable rates of genetic anomalies in progeny and poor performance by release groups.
Assessment: Genetic diversity is maximized through the development of rigorous spawning cross protocols developed collectively with NMFS and reviewed by the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee.

Information products
Program-related information products include:
1) Descriptive statistics for survival, maturation success, age-at-maturity, sex ratio, and gamete quality for genetically distinct broodstocks. Evaluations contribute to increased program success.
2) Evaluation of survival, maturation success, age-at-maturity, and gamete quality for genetically distinct broodstocks held on differential water temperatures. Contribute to increased program success.
3) Evaluation of age-at-maturity, maturation success, and gamete quality for 1994 broodstocks reared under normal and retarded growth regimes. Contribute to increased program success.
4) Evaluation of the efficacy of cryopreserved sperm.
5) Evaluation of outmigration success of supplementation fish by release strategy and lineage. Results incorporated into future spawning, rearing and release plan development to increase program success.
6) Evaluation of survival and spawning success of adult broodstock fish released to volitionally spawn.
7) Evaluation of the utility of otolith microchemistry for the purpose of identifying environmental life history of wild and broodstock O. nerka.
8) BPA and NMFS annual written reports. IDFG Information Bureau press releases.

Coordination outcomes
Coordinated population monitoring (IDFG & Shoshone-Bannock Tribes) generates sound lake carrying capacity estimates to guide supplementation efforts. Coordinated broodstock efforts (IDFG and NMFS facilities) make the best use of the available hatchery space and produce the most desirable products for supplementation and broodstock maintenance. Coordinated efforts (University of Idaho, NMFS, and IDFG) related to the genetic analysis of Stanley Basin O. nerka provide timely data to guide broodstock spawning design.

MONITORING APPROACH
By accounting for the following:
1) That genetic conservation is taking place and that critical population genetics have been successfully “rescued” and returned to Stanley Basin lakes in the form of eyed-egg, juvenile, and adult supplementation.
2) That further conservation of critical population genetics has occurred through the process of milt cryopreservation.
3) That in excess of 500,000 eyed-eggs and juvenile sockeye salmon have been produced to date with the majority of this production being returned to Stanley Basin waters for supplementation.
4) That critical culture-related perimeters (e.g., fertilization success) are improving at IDFG’s Eagle Hatchery. Culture research and adaptive management are responsible for this improvement.
5) That release strategy and lineage-specific outmigration data have contributed (through the process of adaptive management) to improved smolt outmigration success.
6) That without the coordinated efforts of all agencies and individuals working on this and other related projects, Snake River sockeye salmon would be at or near extinction.
7) That adult returns are anticipated beginning in 1997.

Provisions to monitor population status or habitat quality
Stanley Basin 0 nerka populations have been monitored by midwater trawl (IDFG) and dual beam hydroacoustics (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes) since 1991. These data provide the background for interpreting sockeye/kokanee population stability and whole lake fertilization effectiveness. Smolt outmigration from Redfish Lake and the upper Salmon River has been monitored since 1991. Pettit Lake outmigration monitoring began in 1996. Data collected at outmigrant weirs and mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams is used to compare outmigration success of broodstock supplementation progeny by broodstock lineage and release strategy. Limnology monitoring is conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to build baseline data sets and to determine the effects of whole-lake fertilization. Adult returns will be monitored at mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams the adult weirs on Redfish Lake Creek and on the upper Salmon River at IDFG’s Sawtooth Hatchery. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribe monitors juvenile and adult migration on Pettit Lake Creek.

Data analysis and evaluation
Data collected at outmigrant weirs and mainstem Snake and Columbia river dams is used to compare outmigration success of broodstock supplementation progeny by broodstock lineage and release strategy. Non-parametric statistics are used to compare outmigration success of broodstock supplementation progeny. Parametric statistics are used to compare 0. nerka growth and size under pre- and post-fertilization conditions. Several culture-related parameters have and will continue to be compared using parametric statistical tests.

Information feed back to management decisions
Monthly narratives are produced by IDFG personnel and distributed to project participants and cooperators. The Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee reviews and makes recommendations on project activities on a monthly basis; Agency managers participate in this process. Annual project reports are prepared for BPA and for NMFS permitted activities. IDFG Information Bureau personnel produce press releases as needed.

Critical uncertainties affecting project's outcomes
Major critical uncertainties affecting our ability to predict the project’s outcome include: 1) issues related to maturation success and fertilization rate within the broodstock program, 2) smolt outmigration success, 3) adult sockeye salmon return success and 4) genetic bottlenecks and their potential impact on program success and population genetic diversity.
Culture-related uncertainties are addressed through a continuing program of evaluations directed at improving maturation success and fertilization rates. Smolt outmigration success is addressed through a comprehensive program of tracking experimental release groups by broodstock lineage and specific release strategies. Evaluation results are now used to increase the success of the program. Adult return success will be evaluated in relation to culture practice, lineage, release strategy, and migratory conditions. The program will be adaptively managed to incorporate evaluation results to maximize adult returns. Uncertainties related to genetic issues are constantly addressed through an aggressive program designed to maximize diversity during spawning. Great care has been taken to minimize the potential for inbreeding. All brooodstock groups are tracked by specific family.

Evaluation
(See Monitoring Approach section)

Incorporating new information regarding uncertainties
The Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee meets monthly to review project information and guide future program direction. This process achieves monthly what a more typical "project review" process achieves on a considerably less frequent basis. New information is reviewed, a consensus is reached, and plans developed. In addition, this program has developed strong interagency communication ties that help increase the efficiency of effecting change.

Increasing public awareness of F&W activities
Considerable local attention is drawn to project activities in the Stanley Basin of Idaho. Project cooperators strive to maintain an up-to-date awareness at this local level. IDFG Sawtooth Hatchery personnel, IDFG Salmon Region personnel, IDFG sockeye project personnel, and Shoshone Bannock personnel make public contacts on a frequent basis. Idaho Department of Fish and Game Information and Education and enforcement personnel address different audiences several times each year (Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and California) to help get the “word out” regarding measures taken in the Columbia Basin to protect and recover salmon stocks. Idaho and regional news media interview project cooperators frequently and contribute to increasing the publics’ awareness of regional salmon issues.
In Idaho, sockeye salmon are viewed by public, state, and conservation groups as the most vulnerable of the State’s anadromous resources. Considerable local media attention is given to this species. Sockeye salmon, chinook salmon, and steelhead are often times described as significant heritage links that remain simply, too important to ignore and loose.

Section 7. Relationships

Related BPA projectRelationship
9107100 Snake River Sockeye Salmon Habitat Evaluation and Improvement by Shoshone Bannock Tribes Directly associated with this program. Data collected from 91-71 are utilized by this program and vice versa. Data collected from both programs are collectively reviewed by the Stanley Basin Sockeye Technical Oversight Committee -- a review team established by BPA. Nursery lake fertilization studies and evaluation. Predator/prey relationships. Lake population monitoring. General limnology monitoring.
9204000 Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program - National Marine Fisheries Service Duplicate broodstock research and rearing by NMFS. Duplicate broodstock site for the production of eggs and progeny. Research conducted on broodstock rearing techniques. Broodstock genetic sampling.
9009300 Snake River Sockeye Salmon Genetic Analysis - University of Idaho Mitochondrial DNA analysis of broodstock and wild O. nerka. Research used to identify the genetics of broodstock spawners and Stanley Basin O. nerka. Conduct cryopreservation of milt.
9700100 Idaho Department of Fish and Game Chinook Salmon Captive Rearing Program Rear juvenile chinook salmon to adulthood in captivity and release adults back to natal streams to spawn. Program maintains natural production and avoids stock extinction.
Related non-BPA projectRelationship
United States Forest Service. Sawtooth National Recreation AreaProvide permitted access and conditional use for field locations associated with this program.
Idaho Department of Environmental QualityPermit net pen and lake fertilization activities.

Opportunities for cooperation
SHOSHONE BANNOCK TRIBES - Will continue to: Fertilize Redfish Lake and conduct limnology monitoring of Stanley Basin lakes. Monitor kokanee fry recruitment to Stanley Basin lakes. Cooperate on the estimation of 0. nerka predators in Stanley Basin lakes. Cooperate on kokanee reduction in Redfish Lake and Fishhook Creek. Monitor Stanley Basin lake 0. nerka populations with hydroacoustic sampling. Monitor O. nerka outmigration from Pettit Lake. Initiate a fertilization program in Pettit Lake and possibly Alturas Lake. Collect and interpret limnology data.
UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO - Will continue to: Conduct DNA analysis and milt cryopreservation and holding.
NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE - will continue to: Rear and spawn broodstocks and provide eggs to IDFG for rearing and release to Stanley Basin waters. Conduct genetic analysis of broodstock and wild 0. nerka. Cooperate on permit process for this and related activities.
UNITED STATES FOREST SERVICE - will continue to: Provide permitted access and conditional use for sites associated with field activities.
IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY - will continue to: Permit net pen and fertilization activities in Stanley Basin lakes.

Section 8. Costs and FTE

1997 Planned  $663,000

Future funding needs   Past obligations (incl. 1997 if done)
FY$ Need% Plan % Implement% O and M
1998700,000 5%20% 75%
1999700,000 5%20% 75%
2000600,000 5%20% 75%
2001600,000 5%20% 75%
2002600,000 5%20% 75%
 
FYObligated
1991529,673
1992400,185
19931,007,388
1994813,047
1995654,899
1996618,714
Total4,023,906

Other non-financial supporters
Known agency support: National Marine Fisheries Service, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, United States Forest Service.
Known tribal support: Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.
Known citizen group support: Idaho Rivers United, Sawtooth Wildlife Council, Save Our Wild Salmon.
Known business support: Jack See (Redfish Lake Lodge, Stanley ID), George McCovitch (Creekside Motel, Stanley ID).

Longer term costs   $500,000 Continued implementation, operation and maintenance.
FY97 overhead percent   24.6%

How does percentage apply to direct costs
Applies to personnel and operating costs; not to capital costs.

Contractor FTE   Four
Subcontractor FTE   N/A -- Zero