BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1998 Proposal

Section 1. Summary
Section 2. Goals
Section 3. Background
Section 4. Purpose and methods
Section 5. Planned activities
Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation
Section 7. Relationships
Section 8. Costs and FTE

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Summary

Title of project
Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Project

BPA project number   9107800

Short description
Conduct operations and maintenance for Burlington Bottoms Wildlife tract; continue maintenance and enhancement activities for wildlife habitat as necessary, in order to meet the goals and objectives of the management plan.

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameGreg Sieglitz and Sue Beilke, Assistant Staff Wildlife Biologist and Wildlife Biologist
 Mailing address7118 NE Vandenberg Ave.
Corvallis, OR 97330
 Phone541/757-4186
 Emailgreg.b.sieglitz@state.or.us
   

Sub-contractors
N/A

Section 2. Goals

General
Supports a healthy Columbia basin; maintains biological diversity; maintains genetic integrity; increases run sizes or populations; provides needed habitat protection; education

Target stockLife stageMgmt code (see below)
Wood Duck  
Great Blue Heron  
Yellow Warbler  
Black-capped Chickadee Red-tailed Hawk California Valley Quail Beaver Spotted Sandpiper  

 
Affected stockBenefit or detriment
Spring Chinook SalmonBeneficial
Western Pond TurtleBeneficial

Section 3. Background

Stream area affected

Stream name   Multnomah Chanel of Willamette River
Stream miles affected   3
Subbasin   Lower Columbia River
Land ownership   public
Acres affected   417
Habitat types   Riparian/Riverine and Wetlands

History
This site was purchased in 1991 by BPA as mitigation for habitat lost along the Columbia and Willamette Rivers, and as such was one of the first sites in Oregon under the Northwest Power Planning Council Agreement. No cost shares have been received from other agencies for this project.

Biological results achieved
In 1993, a Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was conducted to analyze and assign a value to the existing habitat at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP were used to design management activities related to the maintenance and enhancement of the wildlife habitat. Surveys to gather baseline data for fish, wildlife, and plant populations were conducted in 1993, 1994, and 1995.

Project reports and papers
1) Burlington Bottoms Habitat Evaluation; 2) Results of 1995 and 1996 Neotropical Migratory Landbird Surveys at Burlington Bottoms; and 3) Burlington Bottoms Annual Reports 1995 & 1996.

Adaptive management implications
An adaptive management approach affords the opportunity to alter management activities over time, in response to the success or failure of management actions. The information obtained from monitoring and evalulation will be used to develop and analyze management activities including 1) effectiveness of habitat maintenance and restoration activities, and 2) species occurrence and response to management actions.

Section 4. Purpose and methods

Specific measureable objectives
One of the main objectives of this project is to enhance and maintaind the wildlife habitat at Burlington Bottoms. Using the HEP process, estimates were determined for the long-term effects on the habitat with and without management activities (e.g. estimated prey availability in upland habitat if non-native invasive plant species such as reed canary grass were not controlled.

Critical uncertainties
Critical uncertainies include unknown outcomes of manipulating water levels for controlling plant populations, and how certain wildlife species may be affected by these actions. A second critical uncertainty concerns the amount of funding available for long-term funding and personnel for the lifetime of the project.

Biological need
The Burlington Bottoms project site provides habitat for many species of fish and wildlife, and is a remnant of a once more prevalent wetland habitat along the lower Columbia and Willamette Rivers. Past human disturbances and the invasion of exotic non-native plant and animal species require maintenance and enhancement activities to control and/or eliminate non-native plant species and restore native plant populations, in order to improve both the quality and quantity of fish and wildlife habitat.

Alternative approaches
Alternatives are identified in the Burlington Bottoms Environmental Assessment (December 1994)

Methods
Maintenance and enhancement activities to improve wildlife habitat will occur in various types of habitat, including wetland, riparian forest, and uplands. Methods to control non-native invasive plant populations will include the maintenance and operation of a water control structure on the outlet channel to Horseshoe Lake, mechanical equipment such as a mower to control plant species in the upland habitat, and volunteer manpower to assist in the hand removal of plants in areas not accessible in any other way. The analysis of the results of these activities will be done by performing a modified HEP in the areas where activities occurred, in order to measure habitat changes.

Section 5. Planned activities

Phase ImplementationStart August 97 End Sept. 97Subcontractor Possibly
The engineering and placement of a culvert to replace a damaged wooden bridge will bring the road to within travel specifications. This work may involve a subcontractor. Other enhancement tasks will be undertaken including vegetation removal and additional habitat improvements.
Phase O&MStart 1997 End ongoingSubcontractor No
Tasks include weekly custodial visits, maintaining access into the site, and maintenance of wildlife viewing blinds and informational signs.
Project completion date   1998

Constraints or factors that may cause schedule or budget changes
Risks due to routine operation and maintenance of the site should be minimal.

Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation

SUMMARY OF EXPECTED OUTCOMES

Expected performance of target population or quality change in land area affected
1) It is expected that maintenance and enhancement activities will improve habitat conditions for native fish and wildlife species, including those analyzed under the HEP process. 2) Routine operations and maintenance procedures will ensure that the site is maintained according to direction from the management plan.

Present utilization and convservation potential of target population or area
Current use by sensitive wildlife species such as Western Pond Turtles, Painted Turtles and Red-legged Frogs has been documented. Current inventory work will assist with the development of conservation planning for these species.

Contribution toward long-term goal
Waterfowl, shore and wading birds, wetlands

Indirect biological or environmental changes
Increased nesting areas for pond and painted turtles.

Coordination outcomes
Hydrology Report, Recreation Report, HEP Report (Habitat Evaluation Procedures), Draft Management Plan/Environmental Assessment all complete. Phase II involves implementing recommendations found in Management Plan.

MONITORING APPROACH
Maintenance and enhancement activities to improve wildlife habitat will occur in various types of habitat, including wetland, riparian forest, and uplands. Methods to control non-native invasive plant populations will include the maintenance and operation of a water control structure on the outlet channel to Horseshoe Lake, mechanical equipment such as a mower to control plant species in the upland habitat, and volunteer manpower to assist in the hand removal of plants in areas not accessible in any other way. The analysis of the results of these activities will be done by performing a modified HEP in the areas where activities occurred, in order to measure habitat changes.

Increasing public awareness of F&W activities
The proximity to the Portland metropolitan area provides a multitude of public inolvement activities. These are on-going at the site.

Section 7. Relationships

Related BPA projectRelationship
9205900 Willow Creek Mitigation Project Wildlife mitigation project under Council's program managed by The Nature Conservancy in southern Willamette Valley.
9009200 Conforth Ranch Council mitigation project managed by CTUIR includes enhancement and O&M in the lower Umatilla Basin.
5519500 Willamette Basin Project Council mitigation planning project in the southern Willamette Valley managed by ODFW
5519400 Columbia Basin Mitigation Coordination and Planning project for future mitigation projects sponsored by the Oregon Wildlife Coalition such as above.

Opportunities for cooperation
Opportunities for cooperation include the use of volunteers from various local groups such as The Nature Conservancy, Portland Audubon Society, etc., to assist with maintenance and enhancement activities on the site.

Section 8. Costs and FTE

1997 Planned  $52,000
1996 Unobligated  $12,488

Future funding needs   Past obligations (incl. 1997 if done)
FY$ Need% Plan % Implement% O and M
199855,000     
199958,000     
200062,000     
200165,000     
200268,000     
 
FYObligated
199388,844
199420,000
199564,394
199662,512
Total235,750
FY97 overhead percent   22%

How does percentage apply to direct costs
[Overhead % not provided so BPA appended older data.]