BPA Fish and Wildlife FY 1998 Proposal

Section 1. Summary
Section 2. Goals
Section 3. Background
Section 4. Purpose and methods
Section 5. Planned activities
Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation
Section 7. Relationships
Section 8. Costs and FTE

see CBFWA and BPA funding recommendations

Section 1. Summary

Title of project
Screens and Traps on the Walla Walla and Touchet

BPA project number   9601100

Short description
Provide for safe outmigration of smolts in order to enhance summer steelhead and restore spring chinook salmon runs in the Walla Walla Subbasin. Develop screen/trap facilities to bypass smolts safely to river or capture smolts for trucking from the Little Walla Walla Diversion to the mouth of the Walla Walla River when conditions are not adequate for safe smolt outmigration.

Business name of agency, institution or organization requesting funding
Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

Proposal contact person or principal investigator
 NameGary James, Fisheries Program Manager
 Mailing address
Pendleton, OR 97801
 Phone541/276-4109
 Email
   

Sub-contractors
Montgomery Watson Engineering/Construction Contractor(s)

Section 2. Goals

General
Supports a healthy Columbia basin; maintains biological diversity; maintains genetic integrity; increases run sizes or populations; provides needed habitat protection

Target stockLife stageMgmt code (see below)
Walla Walla River Summer SteelheadSmoltS, W
Walla Walla/Carson Spring ChinookSmoltE, S

 
Affected stockBenefit or detriment
Bull TroutBeneficial to intrabasin migration

Section 3. Background

Stream area affected

Stream name   Walla Walla and Touchet Rivers
Stream miles affected   47 mi. below projects for increased juvenile access and utilization
Subbasin   Walla Walla

History
The native summer steelhead run in the Walla Walla River is currently in a severely depressed state and spring chinook are extinct due largely to inadequate conditions (poor screens and ladders, low flows, etc.) for up and downstream migration. The NE Oregon Hatchery project developed hatchery facility plans for enhancement of summer steelhead and re-establishment of spring chinook in the upper Walla Walla and Touchet Rivers. Fish released from this effort will need improved irrigation ditch screening and a trap and haul contingency plan to ensure that they reach the Columbia River. The proposed screen/trap facilities would be used to capture smolts for trucking from the Little Walla Walla Diversion to the mouth of the Walla Walla River when conditions are not adequate for safe smolt outmigration (similar to Umatilla program). Existing screen facilities do not provide adequate conditions for bypassing or trapping smolts for transportation. Delay of this project may result in further decline of the wild summer steelhead population and limited effectiveness of spring chinook restoration efforts. In 1996, design and engineering work was initiated for the Little Walla Walla Diversion Screens/Trap and Haul project using BPA funds. In 1997 designs continued on this project and a ditch consolidation project in the lower Walla Walla River. Initial project construction is also expected in 1997.

Biological results achieved
Only some design work completed at this time. Results expected upon completion of projects is improved survival for downstream migrating smolts.

Project reports and papers
No project reports completed at this time. Engineering/design documents are being developed in 1997.

Adaptive management implications
Improved juvenile fish passage will compliment other projects (adult fish passage, habitat enhancement, artificial production) necessary for restoration of anadromous fisheries in the Walla Walla Basin. Monitoring and evaluation of fish passage effectiveness at completed facilities will provide useful information for any necessary adjustment at the Walla Walla River projects and possibly useful information for similar adult fish passage needs elsewhere in the Columbia River Basin.

Section 4. Purpose and methods

Specific measureable objectives
Juvenile steelhead mortality is observed annually due to poor screening bypass conditions (most severe is Little Walla Walla River diversion). Measurable results will be the reduction or elimination of this fish loss.

Critical uncertainties
A critically impacted life history stage currently effecting the survival of native summer steelhead and restoration of spring chinook is downstream migration of smolts. Completion of this and other related projects (listed above) addressing additional life history stages will be necessary to implement a comprehensive Walla Walla Basin fish restoration program.

Biological need
Without project, native summer steelhead would continue to be impacted and spring chinook restoration would likely be precluded. See "Project History" above for more information on biological need.

Hypothesis to be tested
N/A

Alternative approaches
N/A

Justification for planning
N/A

Methods
1) Conduct facility engineering and design 2) Construct state of the art screening facilities with associated smolt traps and fish hauling units 3) Evaluate fish passage effectiveness by monitoring fish passage and condition at new facilities.

Section 5. Planned activities

Phase PlanningStart 1996 End 1997Subcontractor
1996 - Engineering & design work initiated on Little Walla Walla diversion and a ditch consolidation project in the lower Walla Walla River 1997 -Finalize designs
Phase ImplementationStart 1997 End 1998Subcontractor
1997 Initiate construction 1998 Finalize construction
Project completion date   Ongoing

Section 6. Outcomes, monitoring and evaluation

SUMMARY OF EXPECTED OUTCOMES

Expected performance of target population or quality change in land area affected
Biologists believe that up to one-half (or more in drought years) of summer steelhead smolts migrating from natural production areas in the Walla Walla River to the Columbia River are lost due to current irrigation screening and low-flow problems in the lower drainage. Current and future hatchery programs which release fish in upriver areas will also avoid an approximate 50% smolt loss.

Present utilization and convservation potential of target population or area
Present summer steelhead populations are 1,000 to 2,000 and spring chinook have been extinct for several decades.

Assumed historic status of utilization and conservation potential
The Walla Walla Basin was believed to once support thousands upon thousands of both salmon and steelhead and the basin sill has much pristine habitat in the headwaters.

Long term expected utilization and conservation potential for target population or habitat
Walla Walla Basin anadromous fish restoration goals are 11,000 summer steelhead and 5,000 spring chinook.

Contribution toward long-term goal
Completion of this and several other ongoing Walla Walla Basin fisheries restoration programs are expected to result in meeting the long-term goals and provide for natural production, harvest, and broodstock collection.

Indirect biological or environmental changes
N/A

Physical products
Approximately 47 stream miles in the lower Walla Walla River below the screen projects will become more "fish friendly" for smolt outmigration.

Environmental attributes affected by the project
N/A

Changes assumed or expected for affected environmental attributes
N/A

Measure of attribute changes
See G above.

Assessment of effects on project outcomes of critical uncertainty
A comprehensive fish passage and natural production assessment is anticipated (similar to the Umatilla Basin program) following completion of several ongoing Walla Walla Basin fisheries restoration projects.

Information products
Following implementation of fish passage improvements, the project will evaluate the fish passage effectiveness at the new projects.

Coordination outcomes
The BPA, COE, an engineering firm, CTUIR, ODFW, WDFW and the Milton-Freewater Water Control District are currently all working well together to identify fish restoration needs, develop solutions and review designs. Good coordination is expected to continue during construction and M & E phases of the project.

MONITORING APPROACH
1) Conduct facility engineering and design 2) Construct state of the art screening facilities with associated smolt traps and fish hauling units 3) Evaluate fish passage effectiveness by monitoring adult upstream migration.

Provisions to monitor population status or habitat quality
A comprehensive fish passage and natural production assessment is anticipated (similar to the Umatilla Basin program) following completion of several ongoing Walla Walla Basin fisheries restoration projects.

Data analysis and evaluation
A multi-agency research coordination committee (similar to the Umatilla Basin program) is expected to later be formed to discuss project results/needs and implement necessary adaptive management actions.

Information feed back to management decisions
See answer immediately above.

Critical uncertainties affecting project's outcomes
See last three answers above.

Evaluation
Post-project success can be indicated by documenting uninhibited juvenile salmon and steelhead passage at the new facilities.

Incorporating new information regarding uncertainties
A multi-agency research coordination committee (similar to the Umatilla Basin program) is expected to later be formed to discuss project results/needs and implement necessary adaptive management actions.

Increasing public awareness of F&W activities
Numerous agencies, irrigation districts, the watershed council, and many private landowners are already involved in the Walla Walla fisheries restoration program. Public awareness is expected to increase through continued coordination of these diverse groups, publication of project reports, local news coverage, etc. (similar to the successful program in the neighboring Umatilla Basin).

Section 7. Relationships

Related BPA projectRelationship
9990071 9990070 9606400 8805302 Adult Fish Passage Improvement in Walla Walla Basin Walla Walla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Walla Walla Co. (SWCD) Habitat Enhancement Northeast Oregon Hatchery - Walla Walla Component All projects are part of a comprehensive Walla Walla Basin watershed/fisheries restoration program. They will compliment juvenile fish passage improvements by adding adult fish passage, habitat enhancement, and hatchery programs.
Related non-BPA projectRelationship
Walla Walla Basin Project - US Army COEAssist with adult passage improvements and develop/implement instream flow enhancement
Walla Walla Basin Project - US BORDevelop/implement instream flow enhancement

Opportunities for cooperation
This project represents a unique opportunity for multi-entity cooperation and cost sharing.. The COE has already begun design work on a new Nursery Bridge Dam ladder and planning for Marie Dorian Dam removal. The COE will fund 75% and BPA will fund 25% of implementation of these projects in 1997.
Habitat enhancement projects in the Walla Walla River watershed are being planned, coordinated, and implemented by the Walla Walla Watershed Council, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Washington Dept. of Fisheries and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the three Soil and Water Conservation Districts in the Walla Walla Basin.
The US Army COE and the US Bureau of Reclamation in coordination with state and tribal fisheries managers are investigating opportunities to augment low instream in the Walla Walla River Basin.
BPA is funding construction of a hatchery facility on the South Fork Walla Walla. CTUIR will operate Phase I for Umatilla Basin adult spring chinook spawning and holding beginning in 1997. Phase II will provide for summer steelhead and spring chinook production for the Walla Walla Basin and is expected to be implemented in 1999.
The adult and juvenile passage projects will be complimented by implementation of these other projects, which all together will constitute a comprehensive Walla Walla Basin fish restoration program.

Section 8. Costs and FTE

1997 Planned  $500,000
1996 Unobligated  $696,992

Future funding needs   Past obligations (incl. 1997 if done)
FY$ Need% Plan % Implement% O and M
19982,800,000 5%95%  
1999200,000    100%
2000200,000    100%
2001200,000    100%
2002200,000    100%
 
Longer term costs   Expected annual cost of $200,000.


For annual operation and maintenance.

FY97 overhead percent   34%

How does percentage apply to direct costs
The 34% is not expected to be applied to at least 90% of the project costs in 1998 due to the primary activity being construction.

Contractor FTE   About 0.25 FTE
Subcontractor FTE   Several? - Exact number unknown at this time because project designs are ongoing.