FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding (Revised Summer 2006)

Proposal 199700100: Idaho Chinook Salmon Captive R

Download this document in MS Word format
Open this document in PDF format

Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
July 14, 2006 Finalized Paul Kline

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199700100
Proposal Name: Idaho Chinook Salmon Captive R
BPA Project Manager: Gregory Baesler
Agency, Institution or Organization: Idaho Department of Fish & Game
Short Description: The IDFG captive rearing program was developed to increase the number of naturally spawning adults and maintain metapopulation structure in selected populations at high risk of extinction while avoiding the impacts of multigenerational hatchery culture.
Information Transfer: Through the development of project annual reports to meet both NOAA Fisheries Permit and BPA contractual obligations. Through meeting notes produced in association with the project's technical oversight committee meetings (available from project sponsors as well as BPA). Through published manuscripts and symposia. Through public presentations to non-technical as well as professional audiences. It is anticipated that information will be used to assess the relative risks and benefits associated with employing captive rearing (as examined by this project) or the more conventional captive broodstocking before initiating intervention practices to maintain, rebuild or simply prevent further loss of specific populations of anadromous fish at risk.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Paul Kline Idaho Department of Fish and Game 1414 E. Locust Ln.
Nampa, ID, 83686
Ph: 208-465-8404
Fax: 208-465-8434
Email: pkline@idfg.idaho.gov
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Greg Baesler
Ph:
Fax:
Email: gdbaesler@bpa.gov
BPA COTR
Danny Baker Idaho Department of Fish and Game 1800 Trout Rd.
Eagle, ID 83616
Ph: (208) 939-4114
Fax: (208) 939-2415
Email: dbaker@idfg.idaho.gov
Technical Contact
Jeff Heindel Idaho Department of Fish and Game 1800 Trout Rd.
Eagle, ID 83616
Ph: (208) 939-4114
Fax: (208) 939-2415
Email: jheindel@idfg.idaho.gov
Technical Contact
Paul Kline Idaho Department of Fish and Game 1414 E. Locust Ln.
Nampa, ID, 83686
Ph: 208-465-8404
Fax: 208-465-8434
Email: pkline@idfg.idaho.gov
Form Submitter
Technical Contact
Tom Rogers Idaho Department of Fish and Game 600 S. Walnut St.
Boise, ID 83707
Ph: 208-334-3791
Fax: 208-334-2114
Email: trogers@idfg.idaho.gov
Supervisor
Tom Rogers is the Anadromous Hatchery Supervisor for the IDFG
Dan Schill Idaho Department of Fish and Game 600 S. Walnut St.
Boise, ID 83707
Ph: 208-287-2777
Fax: 208-334-2114
Email: dschill@idfg.idaho.gov
Supervisor

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Mountain Snake ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Salmon ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
43 40 27N 116 24 7W N/A IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery, Eagle, ID Ada, Idaho Boise No
44 20 57N 114 43 29W Stream Mouth of West Fork Yankee Fork River Custer, Idaho Salmon No
44 16 6N 114 19 33W Stream Mouth of East Fork Salmon River Custer, Idaho Salmon Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer ESU

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Collected BY05 eyed-eggs (336 WFYF and 327 EFSR). No in-hatchery spawning conducted. Out-planted 340 maturing adults to WFYF and EFSR sites. Conducted behavioral monitoring. Transferred 598 BY03 smolts to NOAA seawater facility.
2004 Collected BY04 eyed-eggs (279 WFYF and 444 EFSR). Conducted in-hatchery spawning. Used chilled water to advance spawn timing. Out-planted 74 maturing adults to 2 sites. Conducted behavioral monitoring. Transferred 592 BY02 smolts to NOAA seawater
2003 Collected BY03 eyed-eggs (338 WFYF and 319 EFSR). Conducted in-hatchery spawning. Used chilled water to advance spawn timing. Out-planted 165 maturing adults to 3 sites. Conducted behaviorial monitoring. Transferred 542 BY01 smolts to NOAA seawater
2002 Collected BY02 eyed-eggs (308 WFYF and 328 EFSR). Conducted in-hatchery spawning. Used chilled water to advance spawn timing. Out-planted 347 maturing adults to WFYF & EFSR. Conducted behavioral monitoring. Transferred 582 BY00 smolts to NOAA seawater.
2001 Collected BY01 eyed-eggs (272 WFYF and 311 EFSR). Conducted in-hatchery spawning. Used chilled water to advance spawn timing. Out-planted 89 maturing adults to WFYF. Conducted behavioral monitoring. Transferred 630 BY99 smolts to NOAA seawater facility
2000 Collected BY00 eyed-eggs (304 WFYF and 503 EFSR). No in-hatchery spawning. Out-planted 72 maturing Chinook to Lemhi River system. Conducted behavioral monitoring. Transferred 725 BY98 smolts to seawater (including hatchery-produced safety nets).
1999 Collected BY98 parr (605 for 3 streams) and BY99 eyed-eggs (Lemhi = 264 and EFSR = 143). Conducted in-hatchery spawning (planted eggs). Out-planted adults and conducted behavioral work. Transferred 267 BY97 smolts to NOAA seawater hatchery.
1998 Collected BY97 parr (West Fork = 210 and Lemhi = 147). Conducted in-hatchery spawning. Planted eggs from spawning. Out-planted 68 adults to Lemhi and 44 to West Fork. Conducted behavioral evaluations. Transferred 175 BY96 smolts to seawater hatchery.
1997 Collected BY96 broodstock parr (178 Lemhi, 113 West Fork, and 5 East Fork). Out-planted four BY94 jacks to parent streams (movement and behavior documented). Milt from BY94 males cryopreserved. Transferred 68 BY95 smolts to NOAA seawater facility in WA.
1996 Collected BY95 broodstock (only 163 Lemhi River Chinook parr collected do to low 1995 escapement and spawn success in other streams. Reared fish at Eagle Fish Hatchery. Transferred 237 BY94 smolts to NOAA Fisheries Manchester saltwater facility.
1995 First broodstock collections. Collected BY94 spring Chinook salmon parr from the Lemhi (193), East Fork Salmon (199), and West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon rivers (216). Reared fish at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 198909600 Genetic M&E Prog For Sal/Steel This program is in place to evaluate the effects of out planting hatchery-reared fish on natural and wild populations of spring/summer Chinook salmon and steelhead in four major drainages within the Snake River basin. The two major goals are to evaluate the nature and extent of genetic changes in hatchery stocks to be used for out planting and to quantify the genetic impact of out planting on targeted natural stocks and non-targeted wild stocks.
BPA 199009300 Genetic Analyses of Oncorhynch Through FY2006 this project was in place to directly address conservation genetics questions for the Idaho Chinook captive rearing project. This project developed mitochondrial DNA, and nuclear DNA data for Chinook salmon populations held in the program. The University of Idaho has expressed their intent to not renew project 199009300. As such, the IDFG has included work elements (and budget) in this proposal to assume genetics support responsibility for the Chinook captive rearing program
BPA 199107200 Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Ca The Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Brood Stock program operates from the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery. The sockeye project is in place to protect the remnant Redfish Lake population by developing captive broodstocks to meet reintroduction and broodstock objectives. This program (199700100) and the sockeye project share resources at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery. The Chinook and sockeye salmon programs are managed separately, but program responsibilities overlap and complement each other.
BPA 199305600 Demonstration of Captive Salmo This ongoing research project develops information needed to overcome some of the problems that limit the yield of viable adults and offspring from Pacific salmon stocks reared in captivity, and assesses some of the genetic consequences of captive broodstock programs. The overall goals of this project are: 1) to develop diets, rearing regimes, hatchery practices, and drug therapies that improve survival of adults to spawning, gamete quality, and viability of offspring and that can be applied to captive broodstock programs for depressed stocks of Pacific salmon: 2) to assess quantitative genetic risks of captive broodstock programs to natural populations; and 3) to develop reintroduction strategies for captively-reared fish. Results from this research will be published in peer-reviewed journals, annual reports and scientific meetings.
BPA 199606700 Manchester Spring Chinook Capt NOAA Fisheries is maintaining captive broodstocks of ESA-listed Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon to compliment this program with a seawater rearing element and to spread the risk of catastrophic loss at one facility. NOAA rears smolts received from IDFG through early maturation. Maturing adults are returned to the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery for final maturation in fresh water prior to out planting to target streams.
BPA 199801001 Grande Ronde Captive Brood O&M The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated a captive broodstock program with brood year 1994 Grande Ronde basin Chinook to prevent extinction of three populations, provide a future basis to reverse the decline in stock abundance, and ensure a high probability of population persistence into the future. This program differs from the IDFG program in that it emphasizes captive brood stock rather than captive rearing methods. Collectively, both programs aim at maintaining Snake River basin Chinook salmon metapopulation structure, while investigating two forms of captive propagation and determining their future utility. Oregon hatchery and research staff are generally present at Chinook Salmon Captive Propagation Technical Oversight Committee meetings. Information related to hatchery protocols, fish health, gamete preservation, reproductive characteristics, and field research are routinely exchanged.
BPA 200001900 Tucannon River Spring Chinook Consistent with Oregon captive intervention actions, this project aims to increase the production of smolts released to the Tucannon River between 2002 and 2008. Program staff from Washington are generally present at this program's technical oversight committee meetings. The technical exchange that occurs at these meetings benefits IDFG, Oregon, and Washington programs.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Determine the contribution of program adults Evaluate post-release reproductive behavior. Document and quantify the contribution of out-planted program adults to produce eggs, juveniles, and returning adults. Salmon Strategies: 1B2, 1B3, 2A1, 2A2, 2A5, RM&E Needs 4.2 20, 23, 24, 121
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction The primary project objective is to produce captively reared Chinook salmon for reintroduction to target streams. Salmon Strategies: 1A2, 1B2, 1B3, 1B4, sA1, sA2, 2A4, 3A1, 3A2, 3C1, 3C2, 3C3, 3C4, and RM&E Needs 4.2 20-25, 121

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
01: Produce Hatchery Fish Eagle Hatchery Fish Production Activities associated with the collection of broodstock eggs, incubation of eggs, and hatch and rearing through the smolt stage of development. Transfer of smolts to NOAA Fisheries saltwater facility in Washington State. Transportation of maturing adults back to freshwater at Eagle Hatchery. Transportation of maturing adults to natal streams for natural spawning. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $365,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
* # of Female non-clip (natural origin) fish: rear up to 1,000 NOR females
* # of Jack ad-clip (hatchery origin) fish: rear NOR jacks as they occur in program
* # of Male non-clip (natural origin) fish : rear up to 1,000 NOR males
* Incubation: # fertilized eggs into incubation program.: Incubate up to 1,000 eggs
* Incubation: # fry (button-up) produced.: Incubate up to 1,000 fry
* Production: # adults released from program: Release up to 600 adults to two locations

02: Maintain Hatchery Maintain captive rearing facilities at Eagle FH. All annual work to maintain, repair, and replace materials and equipment associated with the safe operation of the Chinook fish culture program at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $385,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

03: Mark/Tag Animals Marking and tagging Chinook salmon to aid in field observations. Individual fish marking to facilitate in-hatchery and post-release identification. Includes, PIT tags and VIE tags and (may include) Petersen Disc tags, Floy tags, jaw tags. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $49,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Focal Area: tributaries, hatchery
Primary R, M, and E Type: Action, Uncertainties Research
Secondary R, M, and E Type: status and trend

04: Install Fish Monitoring Equipment Install and maintain weir/traps on East Fork Salmon River Installation, maintenance and removal of "blocking" weir to maintain captive-reared, released adults in project study section of the East Fork Salmon River. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $36,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
No Metrics for this Work Element

05: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Chinook salmon hatchery and field monitoring and evaluation. Routine tracking of in-hatchery fish culture variables (e.g., incubation success, hatch success, survival to smoltification, fish health history, inspections, treatments, growth, maturation, etc.). Includes all monitoring associated with the collection of field behavioral information on adult Chinook salmon released to naturally spawn (e.g., courtship behavior, spawning behavior, survival, habitat use, etc). Includes the collection of tissue for genetic analysis. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $594,311
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
Focal Area: Tributaries, Hatchery
Primary R, M, and E Type: Uncertainties, Action
Secondary R, M, and E Type: Status Trend

06: Analyze/Interpret Data Analyze and interpret data for the Chinook salmon captive rearing program. Evaluation and analysis of specific hatchery variables such as growth, survival, and maturation. Specific analysis of behavioral and spawn success data from field observations. This work element includes the development of DNA microsatellite genotype information for all program fish and includes estimate of reproductive success through the completion of parental exclusion products. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $298,874
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

07: Manage and Administer Projects Chinook salmon captive rearing program administrative responsibilities. Required project management including (but not limited to): the development ,submittal, and tracking of project SOWs, budgets, and accrual estimates. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $16,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

08: Coordination Quarterly CSCPTOC coordination meetings Project technical oversight coordination meetings are held four to six times per year. Meetings serve as a sounding board for project activity development and provide a forum to discuss project findings and results. Written material is shared and complete minutes are kept and made available to the public through BPA. Meeting minutes and project written material serve as a deliverable for this work element. This work element also includes attendance of "program essential" coordination meetings with CBFWA, BPA, and NPCC (and others as appropriate). 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $40,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

09: Produce Annual Report Chinook salmon captive rearing BPA reports. Produce a combined annual report for BPA covering activities at Eagle Fish Hatchery and IDFG monitoring and evaluation activities. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $45,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

10: Produce Status Report Quarterly project status reports. Produce quarterly status reports for the project 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $7,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

11: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Chinook salmon captive rearing compliance report. Ensure environmental clearance is received for activities that require it. NOAA ESA reporting to be completed as expected. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Determine the contribution of program adults
Produce captive-reared Chinook for reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel [blank] $207,384 $211,532 $215,762
Fringe Benefits [blank] $97,470 $99,420 $101,409
Travel [blank] $17,194 $17,650 $18,091
Supplies [blank] $169,500 $177,800 $186,775
Overhead [blank] $103,225 $106,345 $109,628
Totals $594,773 $612,747 $631,665

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$1,839,185
Total Work Element budget$1,839,185

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
IDFG facility improvements $95,000 $25,000 $25,000 In-Kind Under Development
Totals $95,000 $25,000 $25,000

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$300,000 $200,000 Should sunset by 2012
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
This program serves as a cash cost share for the Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program (199107200). Discussions to resolve how to offset the loss of this cost share should begin prior to the sunsetting of this program.
 
Termination Date Comments
2012 This program serves as a cash cost share for the Redfish Lake Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program (199107200). Discussions to resolve how to offset the loss of this cost share should begin prior to the sunsetting of this program.
 
Final Deliverables
The final program completion report will include the development of recommendations on the efficacy of the captive rearing approach to maintaining populations of anadromous fish experiencing high levels of demographic and/or genetic risk.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date
Fix-it Loop Documents
Documents Originally Submitted with this Proposal

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
Location:
Province: No Change
Subbasin: No Change
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments:


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 NPCC Rec
$518,000
FY 2008 NPCC Rec
$518,000
FY 2009 NPCC Rec
$518,000
Total NPCC Rec
$1,554,000
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
NPCC Comments: Reduced budget reflects the removal of the all genetic elements except the critical needs associated with identifying progeny of captive adults.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 NPCC Rec
$518,000
FY 2008 NPCC Rec
$518,000
FY 2009 NPCC Rec
$518,000
Total NPCC Rec
$1,554,000
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
NPCC Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: Tasks removed: Gentics elements. $25000 has been added to this project to partially fund critical genetics work. (orig rec $493000)


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
Comments: The Idaho Captive Rearing program collects naturally produced Chinook salmon parr or eyed eggs, and then rears them in captivity to adults for release to increase the number of naturally spawning salmon.

The proposal indicates that this experimental effort will be terminated by 2012. The sponsors request funding to complete the evaluation of this captive rearing strategy. The ISRP raised several questions in the preliminary response.

The principal query was for an outline of the timeline of juvenile rearing and adult release, and the subsequent natural parr, smolt, and adult production, to ensure that the time frame for the data collection and analysis was sufficient. The sponsors provided an answer to this question that was sufficient.

A secondary question was about the natural spawning performance of the captive stock. In earlier proposals, the sponsors reported asynchrony in the spawning of natural and cultured adults, and poor egg viability in natural redds produced from captive stock. No mention of this was in the current proposal and the ISRP requested an update. The sponsors provided a review of the recent observations on asynchrony, reporting that during the last funding cycle this was not a problem. Egg viability was not tested during this time period. No explanation was provided for the improvement in synchrony between natural and cultured spawning adults.

Finally, the ISRP asked about the quantitative benefits from a program like this to an entire ESU, under circumstances such as the spring and summer run Chinook in the Snake River that consist of an appreciable number of spawning units. That is, assuming there is a demographic benefit in the treated tributary, what are the quantitative consequences in the Viable Salmonid Population metrics for the ESU, from these improvements in individual sites.

Sponsors responded that:

"It remains difficult for us to comment on whether the potential added adult production from this program will elevate VSP abundance or productivity parameters to a status level more desirable than the current ‘High Risk’ standing. Nevertheless, added adult production will help ensure that a continuum of spawning from one generation to another occurs. Preventing cohort loss will slow the loss of critical population genetic variation and preserve future recovery options."

The ISRP appreciates this candid appraisal, but emphasizes that addressing this larger issue is critical when considering using this technology to support ESUs consisting of multiple independent populations or spawning aggregates. When you have 30 to 40 independent populations in an ESU, what aggregate demographic benefit are you getting if you can improve the status by these intensive actions in one or two of the individual populations? What is the short and medium term benefit from this type of action?

The final reports and analyses should include this later consideration of the quantitative benefits at the ESU level if benefits are demonstrated at the independent population level.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Response requested
Comments: The Idaho Captive Rearing program collects naturally produced Chinook salmon parr or eyed eggs from redds in the Lemhi, West Fork Yankee Fork Salmon, and the East Fork Salmon rivers. The experimental strategy was developed to increase the number of naturally spawning adults while attempting to avoid the impacts of multigenerational hatchery culture.

Over nine years, 1276 adult salmon were released in the treatment streams (an average of 142 fish per year). Through 2005, 149 redds produced by captive-reared Chinook salmon have been documented. Approximately 1/4 of the 558 known females released to spawn constructed redds. Forty-six redds have been sampled for live eggs. Approximately 60 percent of sampled redds contained fertilized embryos, most of which had reached the eyed-stage of development. For redds containing fertilized eggs, egg survival to the eyed-stage of development averaged about 50 percent.

A succinct summary of the collection of eggs and fry, their survival in culture to smolts and adults, and their mating in the wild is provided. The picture presented here is much more positive than reported previously -- little attention paid to dead eggs excavated from redds, asynchronous development compared to natural fish, and poor rigor on the part of males. There was no indication of improvement and explanation of the changes in perspective over the last couple years.

The proposal indicates that this experimental effort will be terminated by 2112. In the remaining years, the sponsors propose evaluating whether the eggs deposited by captive reared adults produce fry and smolts and whether any of these fish successfully migrate to the ocean and return as adults. Once that is completed this type of captive propagation can be fully described and evaluated.

On the understanding that continuation of this project is to complete cycles essential for a final evaluation, it warrants consideration. In the ISRP view it is not yet clear whether this captive propagation technology can be used to benefit salmon.

In their response sponsors should first focus on the reproductive success and pedigree experiments. The response should provide the time-line for stocking the adults, evaluating the parr and smolts, and returning adults, so the ISRP can clearly see this can be completed before 2112. Secondly, a justification for the evaluation of gene diversity needs to be presented. There is no need to worry about gene diversity if the strategy is not likely to produce a demographic benefit to the focal species. Finally, a quantification of any potential benefit to the VSP parameters of the focal species ESU is needed. The objective is the successful natural production of natural parr, smolts, and adults, to preventing extirpation of the populations, and rebuilding to self-sustaining levels. But even if there is some benefit to one or two local populations, how does this affect the broader scale status of the ESU? Is the benefit too little and too localized?

The participants do a good job of regularly giving presentations at regional meetings and publishing in the peer-reviewed literature.

The response should review/consider information in the ISRP programmatic summary concerning captive rearing.

Maintained by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority. Please direct comments or questions to the webmaster.