FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199401806: Tucannon Stream and Riparian Protection, Enhancement, and Restoration

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Debra Nordheim

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199401806
Proposal Name: Tucannon Stream and Riparian Protection, Enhancement, and Restoration
BPA Project Manager: Jay Marcotte
Agency, Institution or Organization: Columbia Conservation District
Short Description: Implement habitat protection, enhancement, and recovery strategies to support Subbasin Plan identified ESA focal, cultural significant and species of interest recovery within the Tucannon Subbasin.
Information Transfer: Results provided via BPA Metric reporting, Annual Report Of Accomplishments submitted to BPA and project monitoring and evaluation reports.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Debra Nordheim Columbia Conservation District 202 South Second Street
Dayton, WA, 99328-1327
Ph: 509.382.4773
Fax: 509.382.4273
Email: debra-nordheim@wa.nacdnet.org
Form Submitter I will be the form submitter. The Columbia Conservation District administers the Tucannon River Watershed Program.
All Assigned Contacts
Terry Bruegman Columbia Conservation District 202 South Second Street
Dayton, WA 99328-1327
Ph: 509.382.4773
Fax: 503.382.4273
Email: terry-bruegman@wa.nacdnet.org
Project Lead
The Columbia Conservation District administers the Tucannon River Watershed Program
Debra Nordheim Columbia Conservation District 202 South Second Street
Dayton, WA, 99328-1327
Ph: 509.382.4773
Fax: 509.382.4273
Email: debra-nordheim@wa.nacdnet.org
Form Submitter
I will be the form submitter. The Columbia Conservation District administers the Tucannon River Watershed Program.

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Tucannon ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
46* 26' 25 117* 44' 56 Tucannon River Tucannon River (65.87 miles with lat & lon at Marengo) incompassing Subreaches: Mountain Tucannon (MTN, 10.28 miles from rm 46.26 to 56.54); Hatchery-Little Tucannon (HL, 7.85 miles from rm 38.41 to 46.26); Tumalum-Hatchery (TH, 4.06 miles from rm 34.35 to 38.41); Marengo-Tumalum (MT, 8.37 miles from rm 25.98 to 34.35); Pataha-Marengo (PM, 14.02 miles from rm 11.96 to 25.98) ;Lower Tucannon & it's tributaries(LT, 21.87 miles from 0.0 to 11.96 plus 9.33 miles of tributaries) Columbia, Washington Tucannon Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Snake River Fall ESU
Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer ESU
Steelhead Snake River ESU
Bull Trout

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 3 off-site water systems. 17.7 ac CREP. 4 screen/flow meters. 0 trees due to drought. 600 ac of School Fire reseeded. 1.0cfs & 180.0ac ft water trusted. Temp. Modeling & Cobble Embeddedness studies.
2004 32,691 trees. 1 off-site water system. 2604 ft riparian fence. 22 screen/flow meters. 2.598cfs & 264.88acft water trusted. Subbasin Management Plan. Milestone Assess.
2003 28,360 trees planted. 197.5 ac in CREP. 420.5 ac conservation tillage. 18,228.4 ft riparian fence. 2 off-site water systems. 8 screen/flow meters. 6.4cfs & 243acft water trusted. Model Plan Milestone Assess. Subbasin Management Plan.
2002 127,705 trees planted. 414.6 ac in CREP. 650.2 ac conservation tillage. Monitor habitat projects & water temp.(WDFW). Lead & particpated in WCC Limiting Factors, HB-2415 Plan, DOE IFIM & TMDL, 2496 SRFB Lead, & begain Snake River Salmon Recovery processes
2001 5 instream habitat projects(6 lg & 44 sm-med pools, 1175 ft LWD & complexity) 77,370 trees. 1332.1 ac conservation tillage. 154.6 ac in CREP. Monitor habitat projects(WDFW). Water quality monitoring(WSU).Subbasin Summary.
2000 11 instream habitat projects(18 lg & 72 sm-med pools, 4490 ft LWD & complexity, 1 off-channel rearing) 69,276 trees, 1852 ac conservation tillage. Monitor habitat projects(WDFW). Water quality monitoring(WSU). 168.5 ac in CREP.
1999 9 instream habitat projects(22 lg & 89 sm-med pools,6146 ft LWD & complexity, 1 off-channel rearing) 26,000 trees. 1870.6 ac conservation tillage. 2 upland sediment basins. Monitor habitat projects(WDFW), ISCO-sediment samplers & water quality(WSU).
1998 12 instream habitat projects (15 lg & 146 sm-med pools, 5540 ft LWD & complexity, 1 off-channel rearing, 1 irrgation mod). 11,891 ft riparian fence. 10,000 trees. 2665.24 ac conservation tillage. WDFW monitor instream project performance.
1997 Final Model Watershed Plan. Provide WDFW equip. to monitor water temp. 12 instream projects (8 lg. & 98 sm-med pools, 6828 ft LWD & complexity, 3 off-channel rearing, 1 irrigation mod). 5762 ft riparian fence. 7000 trees. 663.7 ac conservation tillage.
1996 20 instream habitat project creating 5 lg & 125 sm-med pools, 4620 ft LWD & complexity, 1 off-channel rearing, 1 irrigation mod. 3100 ft riparian fence. 500 trees planted. Repaired 1 riparian desilting basin. Built 1 upland desilting basin.
1995 Conducted an on-the-ground reach-by-reach habitat condition assessment. Completed 1st draft of the Model Watershed Plan.
1994 Installed a series of 3 desilting basins in spring chinook spawning and rearing reach as a wetland enhancement and sediment control project.
1993 Initiated Model Watershed Plan. IFIM study. 4,700 ft riparian fencing. 2 limited access & 1 off-river water sites. Created pools via instream habitat structures. Planted 1,460 native trees.
1992 Wrote 14 PL-566 conservation plans incompassing 13,823.5 ac. Planted 3,043 native trees and shrubs in riparian areas using volunteer fishermen.
1991 Received Congressional funding for the Tucannon PL-566 program.
1990 Created additional pool with debris, via boulder clusters and christmas trees, and planted 1900 native trees within the 2.5 mile demonstration site.
1989 Created 28 lg. & med. resting pools via habitat structures & planted 7200 native trees along a 2.5 mile length of river as a demonstration site.
1988 Wrote 11 Conservation Farm Plans encompassing 2927.1 ac of farm ground in the drainages of the 2 sediment basins.
1987 2 lg. sediment basins installed with combined drainage of 5336 ac. in prime spring chinook spawning area. Basins caught 3971 tons of sediment the first year. 8000 ft. riparian fencing. 10,049 trees planted (willows, alder, cottonwood, vine maple, pine)
1986 Conducted a riparian tree density study in collaboration with WDFW.
1985 Finalized USDA PL-566 process for submittal.
1984 Initiated USDA PL-566 process for watershed assessment and funding for implementation of BMP's for agriculture, range, & riparian areas.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
PCSRF - WSRFB 01-1226 WDFW Wm T Wooten Riparian Proj Provide cost share funding to install CREP riparian buffer BMP's on WDFW lands along the upper Tucannon. Installation to be completed by 2008.
PCSRF - WSRFB 02-1544 Tucannon River Screens Phase 2 Provides cost share funding to install NMFS, USFWS, and WDFW compliant fish screens for irrigation withdrawals.
Other: USDA/WCC 06-46-CR-01 Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) Provides 10% of installation and 100% of maintenance, years 1 through 5, to establish Riparian Forest Buffers and associated BMP's.
Other: WCC 06-46-IE-01 Irrigation Efficiencies Provides cost share funding for irrigation system updates if sufficent water is saved and trusted as an instream flow allocation via the Washington Water Trust.
BPA 199401807 Habitat For Fall Chinook, Stee This encompasses the Pataha Creek, a major tributary to the lower Tucannon. It negatively effects habitat and water quality in the lower Tucannon where fall chinook spawn, steelhead rear, and bull trout over winter.
BPA 200001900 Tucannon River Spring Chinook Supplementation to increase natural production in the Tucannon
BPA 200001900 Tucannon River Spring Chinook Provides supplementation to the Tucannon River.
Other: WDOE C0300164 Flow Meters Provide cost share funding to install flow meters on irrigation withdrawals.
Other: LSRCP none Lyons Ferry Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Evaluation of hatchery supplementation in the Snake River Region - mitigation of empacts due to hydrosystem.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed two pieces of LWD/channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, & 14 for Objective PM 2.1 152
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 10% or greater of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, & 11 for Objective PM 3.1 152
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to exceed 75% riparian function. Increase in riparian function and a decrease in confinement will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, & 15 for Objective PM 4.1 152
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width Reach or exceed two pieces of LWD/channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase suvival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, & 14 for Objective PM 2.1 148
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area. Increase the portion of primary pools to 10-15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase suvival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, & 11 for Objective PM 3.1 148
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function. Initiate riparian recovery and re-estblishment in heavily degraded areas to achieve 60% riparian function. Increase in riparian function and a decrease in confinement will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, & 15 for Objective PM 4.1 149
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 23, & 24 for Objective PM 5.1 149
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab Increase LWD to more than one piece/channel width below Panjab Creek. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearly rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, spawning, subadult rearing, juvenile rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, & 14 for Objective PM 2.1 153
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery Increase LWD to achieve a naturally function system through natural recovery and recruitment above Panjap Creek. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearly rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, spawning, subadult rearing, juvenile rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, & 14 for Objective PM 2.1 153
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% or greater of stream surface area below Panjab Creek. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, & 11 for Objective PM 3.1 153
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab Increase the proportion of primary pools to achieve a naturally functioning system through natural recruitment of LWD above Panjab Creek. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, & 11 for Objective PM 3.1 153
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. This will also stimulate a corresponding decrease in percent fines and turbidity. Reduction in sediment (turbidity, percent fines and embeddedness) will increase survival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 1.1.18-Install properly designed instream structures, including boulders, vortex rock weirs, for short-term pool formation. 141
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. This will also stimulate a corresponding decrease in percent fines and turbidity. Reduction in sediment (turbidity, percent fines and embeddedness) will increase survival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 1.1.1-Improve the extent, structure, & function of riparian buffers through vegetation planting, managed grazing, selective livestock fencing, and similar practices, including tributaries that contribute to priority areas. 140
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. This will also stimulate a corresponding decrease in percent fines and turbidity. Reduction in sediment (turbidity, percent fines and embeddedness) will increase survival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 1.1.19-Increase landowner participation in federal, state, tribal, and local programs that enhance wtershed condtions(e.g. CRP, CREP, Wetlands Reserve, EQIP, Landowner Incentive, Partners for Fish & Wildlife, Conservation Security, etc.) 141
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. This will also stimulate a corresponding decrease in percent fines and turbidity. Reduction in sediment (turbidity, percent fines and embeddedness) will increase survival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 1.1.20-Seek additional funding sources consistent with current CRP and CREP guidelines to increase individual landowner enrollment in programs that achieve similar goals. 141
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%. This will also stimulate a corresponding decrease in percent fines and turbidity. Reduction in sediment (turbidity, percent fines and embeddedness) will increase survival of steelhead(incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 1.1.21-Seek funding sources to develop programs consistant with the goals of CRP & CREP in those areas where such programs are not available (e.g. smaller tibutaries high in the subbasin). 141
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM2.1.1-Improve the extent, structure, & function of riparian buffers through vegetation plantings, managed grazing, selective livestock fencing, and similar practices, including tributaries that contribute to priority areas. 141
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.2-Increase the density of woody vegetation in riparian buffers for long-term recruitment of LWD. 141
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM2.1.12-Increase landowner participation in federal, state, tribal, and local programs that enhance wtershed condtions(e.g. CRP, CREP, Wetlands Reserve, EQIP, Landowner Incentive, Partners for Fish & Wildlife, Conservation Security, etc.) 142
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.13-Seek additional funding sources consistent with current CRP and CREP guidelines to increase individual landowner enrollment in programs that achieve similar goals. 142
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.14-Seek funding sources to develop programs consistant with the goals of CRP & CREP in those areas where such programs are not available (e.g. smaller tibutaries high in the subbasin). 142
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.3- Add LWD in the form of rootwads, log jams, and similar structures that mimic natural formations. 141
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.4- Retain existing LWD and limit removal of newly-recruited LWD. 141
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.5- Improve stream sinuosity (e.g. meander reconstruction) to slow stream velocities and facilitate retention of LWD. 141
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width. Reach or exceed one piece of LWD per channel width. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 2.1.6- Install properly designed instream structures; including boulders, vortex rock weirs, and LWD for short-term pool formation. 141
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.3- Add LWD in the form of rootwads, log jams, and similar structures that mimic natural formations. 143
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.5- Improve stream sinuosity (e.g. meander reconstruction) to facilitate long-term natural pool formation. 143
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.6- Install properly designed instream structures; including boulders, vortex rock weirs, and LWD for short-term pool formation. 143
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.1-Improve the extent, structure, & function of riparian buffers through vegetation planting, managed grazing, selective livestock fencing, and similar practices, including tributaries that contribute to priority areas. 143
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.2-Increase the density of woody vegetation in riparian buffers for long-term recruitment of LWD. 143
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.10-Increase landowner participation in federal, state, tribal, and local programs that enhance wtershed condtions(e.g. CRP, CREP, Wetlands Reserve, EQIP, Landowner Incentive, Partners for Fish & Wildlife, Conservation Security, etc.) 143
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area. Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (egg incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 3.1.11-Seek additional funding sources consistent with current CRP and CREP guidelines to increase individual landowner enrollment in programs that achieve similar goals. 143
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.1-Improve the extent, structure, & function of riparian buffers through vegetation planting, managed grazing, selective livestock fencing, and similar practices, including tributaries that contribute to priority areas. 144
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.2-Increase the density of woody vegetation in riparian buffers for long-term recruitment of LWD. 144
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.3-Protect high quality riparian habitats in areas of high development pressure through conservation easements, long-term leases, land exchanges, public ed., promotion of BMPs, alternative grazing strategies & install of alternative livestock water. 144
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.5-Protect riparian vegetation through promotion of livestock BMPs such as alternative grazing rotations & the installation of alternative forms of water for livestock. 144
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.14-Increase landowner participation in federal, state, tribal, and local programs that enhance wtershed condtions(e.g. CRP, CREP, Wetlands Reserve, EQIP, Landowner Incentive, Partners for Fish & Wildlife, Conservation Security programs, etc.) 144
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.7-Protect wetland and riparian habitats through land conservation easements, long-term leases, land exchanges, public ed., & promotion of urban, forestry, & agricultural BMPs, where applicable. 144
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function. Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function. Increase in riaprian function and a decrease in confinement will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 4.1.15- Seek additional funding sources consistent with current CRP and CREP guidelines to increase individual landowner enrollment in programs that achieve similar goals. 144
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.1-Improve the extent, structure, & function of riparian buffers through vegetation planting, managed grazing, selective livestock fencing, and similar practices, including tributaries that contribute to priority areas. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.2- Increase the density of woody vegetation in riparian buffers for long-term recruitment of LWD. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM5.1.3- Protect high quality riparian habitats in areas of high development pressure through conservation easements, long-term leases, land exchanges, public ed., promotion of BMPs, alternative grazing strategies & install of alternative livestock water. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.5- Protect riparian vegetation through promotion of livestock BMPs such as alternative grazing rotations & the installation of alternative forms of water for livestock. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.6- Conduct appropriate shade resotration activities where streamside shading has been reduced by anthropogenic activities. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.7- Protect wetland and riparian habitats through land conservation easements, long-term leases, land exchanges, public ed., & promotion of urban, forestry, & agricultural BMPs, where applicable. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.23- Increase landowner participation in federal, state, tribal, and local programs that enhance wtershed condtions(e.g. CRP, CREP, Wetlands Reserve, EQIP, Landowner Incentive, Partners for Fish & Wildlife, Conservation Security, etc.) 147
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.24- Seek additional funding sources consistent with current CRP and CREP guidelines to increase individual landowner enrollment in programs that achieve similar goals. 147
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.10- Decrease the width-to-depth ratio through instream improvements, selective bank stabilization & other methods. The use of "hard" stabilization methods such as rip rap, concrete, or railroad ties is discouraged. 146
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (incubation, fry, subyearling rearing, and yearling rearing life history stages), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and pre-spawning life history stages) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon PM 5.1.11- Improve stream sinuosity (e.g. meander reconstruction) to facilitate long-term natural pool formation. 146
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings Maintain more than one piece of LWD/channel width below Cummings Creek. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, & 14 for Objective PM 2.1 150
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings Increase LWD to two pieces/channel width above Cummings Creek. Increase in LWD densities will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering, and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning) and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 12, 13, & 14 for Objective PM 2.1 150
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area Increase the proportion of primary pools to 10% of stream surface area below Cumming Creek. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, & 11 for Objective PM 3.1 150
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area Increase the proportion of primary pools to 15% of stream surface area above Cumming Creek. Increase in primary pool quantity, quality and complexity will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 10, & 11 for Objective PM 3.1 150
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-estblishment) to achieve 40-50% riparian function below Cummings Creek. Increase in riparian function and a decrease in confinement will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, & 15 for Objective PM 4.1 151
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function Continue riparian recovery (increasing riparian complexity, width, and re-establishment) to achieve at least 75% riparian function and increased riparian complexity from Cummings Creek to the Hatchery. Increase in riparian function and a decrease in confinement will increase survival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 14, & 15 for Objective PM 4.1 151
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures. Decrease summer daily maximum temperatures to no more than 4 days greater than 75*F (24*C) and show progress toward meeting Washington State temperature standards and TMDL goals. Decrease in summer temperatures will increase suvival of steelhead (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and yearling rearing), spring chinook (fry, subyearling rearing, overwintering and pre-spawning), and bull trout (adult migration, juvenile outmigration, subadult rearing life history stages). Tucannon See Strategies 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 23, & 24 for Objective PM 5.1 151

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Project Environmental Compliance Develop Cultural Resource Surveys, NEPA checklists, and Biological Assessments as required for identified projects. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $32,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Increase Instream Habitat Complexity Increase key instream habitat complexity quantity and quality. Increase key instream habitat diversity and complexity to move toward biolgical objective levels. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $320,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
* # of stream miles treated: 1.5
* # of structures installed: 36

Lease Land CREP 5 year Extension Extend CREP contracts for an additional 5 year period by providing landowner/contract holder with an up-front payment. Riparian recovery and longevity are critical for restoration success. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $400,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
* # of acres of new lease: 602.9
* # of riparian miles protected: 28.9

Coordination Coordinate activities to implement the Tucannon Subbasin plan. Participate in coordination of regional planning processes; subbasin, Snake River Salmon Recovery, WRIA 35 Watershed planning, regional project monitoring plan . Coordinate the development of projects to implement the Tucannon Subbasin Plan. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $57,625
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Identify and Select Projects Develop and/or update potential project lists Project files developed, in conjunction with technical agency personnel, for each project to include initial scoping and design. Serve as a clearing house for project selection. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $22,687
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Manage and Administer Projects Tucannon Subbasin Plan Project Implementation Project management and administrative work related to implementation of the Tucannon Subbasin Plan projects. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $150,698
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Outreach and Education Community Involvement in Habitat Restoration Activities that involve local and agency personnel in habitat protection, enhancement, and restoration. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
* # of general public reached: 75
* # of students reached: 60
* # of teachers reached: 5

Produce Annual Report Annual Report Annual report describing all project accomplishments for each fiscal year. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $3,700
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Pisces Status Report Milestone Status Report progress toward reaching milestones 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $2,500
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Habitat project site attribute evaluation. Contract with WDFW to measure and evaluate pre-installation and post-installation project site habitat attibutes and to continue cooperative effort to monitor water temperature throughout the basin. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $38,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 1.1-2 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
HL 2.1-Increase pools to 10% or more of stream.
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 1.1-2 or 2+ pieces of LWD/channel width
MT 2.1-Increase pools to 10-15% of stream area.
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
MT 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
MTN 1.1-1 piece LWD/channel width below Panjab
MTN 1.2-Increase LWD through natural recovery
MTN 2.1-Increase pools to 15% or more below Panjab
MTN 2.2-Increase pools above Panjab
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 2.1-1 or more piece of LWD per channel width.
PM 3.1-Increase pools to 15% of stream area.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
PM 5.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
TH 1.1-1+ pieces LWD/channel width below Cummings
TH 1.2-2 pieces LWD/channel width above Cummings
TH 2.1-Increase pools to 10% of stream area
TH 2.2-Increase pools to 15% of stream area
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
TH 4.1-Decrease summer daily water temperatures.
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Sediment & Cobble Embeddedness Sampling Contract with USFS to operate ISCO sediment samplers and perform cobble embeddednes sampling to measure impacts thoughout the subbasin. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $15,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
HL 3.1-Exceed 75% riparian function
MT 3.1-Initiate riparian recovery to 60% function.
PM 1.1-Reduce embeddedness within the area to 20%.
PM 4.1-Continue riparian recovery to 75% function.
TH 3.1-Achieve 40-50% riparian function
TH 3.2-Achieve 75% riparian function
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel 1.1 FTE split between Lead, Assistant, & Engineer (utilizing composite rates which include benefits) $68,764 $70,827 $72,952
Travel mileage $2,002 $2,070 $2,138
Supplies Office and operations $6,942 $7,150 $7,365
Other Contract Services/Cost-share - Land Lease $120,000 $130,000 $150,000
Other Contract Services/Cost-sahre - Instream Habitat $95,072 $111,881 $113,047
Other Contracted Services - Environmental/Cultural Resources $18,000 $7,000 $7,000
Other Contracted Services - M & E $20,000 $20,000 $13,000
Totals $330,780 $348,928 $365,502

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$1,045,210
Total Work Element budget$1,045,210

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
WSRFB cost share $92,000 $100,000 $130,000 Cash Under Development
Totals $92,000 $100,000 $130,000

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$382,727 $401,863 Budget suggests a 5% annual increase.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
Project O&M is the responsibility of the landowner unless a catastrophic natural event occurs. In the case of a natural event, impacts on per-project bases will be evaluated for possible cost share assistance to maintain project intent.
 
Termination Date Comments
2021 Tucannon Subbasin Plan implementation anticipated a 15 year schedule. Continuous annual funding will allow implementation of strategies on a progressive base for accumulative gains in meeting biological objectives.
 
Final Deliverables
Reports documenting habitat gains impacting focus species life-cycle survivability and Tucannon ecosystem function. Reports will be from monitoring and evaluation efforts contracted to resource agencies, BPA BiOp Metrics, and project Pisces and annual accomplishments.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$331,333
FY 2008 Budget
$331,333
FY 2009 Budget
$331,333
Total NPCC Rec
$993,999
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: ISRP fundable qualified. Also see Programmatic Issue: habitat m&e.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$331,333
FY 2008 Budget
$331,333
FY 2009 Budget
$331,333
Total NPCC Rec
$993,999
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:
NPCC Staff Comments: ISRP fundable qualified: programmatic habitat m&e issue, see decision memo discussion.

Local or MSRT Comments: See Washington guidance


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: Questions and comments from the ISRP were clarified for a number of issues as best as possible.

Some data is reported on fish density, but it is not clear that the project personnel are adaptively managing based on these data. It's not clear that the structures are actually benefiting the fish. They likely need another year to see if anything is changing.

Project sponsors provided some sediment/embeddedness measures from sampling by the U.S. Forest Service in 2005. These data can at least provide a baseline for assessments in the future, both in the mainstem and to help assess activities in the Pataha Creek basin. They also provided a 2002 progress report that provided some baseline data for temperature and for fish densities at several index sites, data that might be useful in the future. Statistical analysis of fish density data from control and treatment sites showed no significant differences between sites. Temperature data did not provide a basis for describing any trends in the system.

Qualification: Since there are no data and thus no scientific justification for continuing this project, it would have to be continued based on a qualification that the substrate, temperature, and fish density work be continued in such a way that decisions are possible regarding the effectiveness of project activities. The sponsors should make full use of data from other fish monitoring projects in the basin to help meet this requirement.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Response requested
NPCC Comments: This work has been ongoing for a sufficient amount of time to have made significant progress from the past reviews, but it includes no description of biological benefits nor does it demonstrate adaptive management. The history of the project is more reassuring than the proposed work. It puts more emphasis on riparian types of work. Perhaps the instream part of this project could be terminated.

Sponsors did provide some information to show impact of projects on physical structure of the channel, but none to show the biological benefits. The data (Tables 1 and 2) presented are difficult to interpret. Many more pools were reported in 2000 than in 1998, but the stream got wider and shallower. Stream discharge was greater in 2000 than in 1998 making it difficult to assign the observed differences to project activities. Data in Table 12 are offered as evidence of benefits for fish, but these data need to be compared to similar data from both control and treatment sites before the alterations were made if it is to have any meaning.

Demonstrated value of the work depends on availability of information to describe changes that have occurred as a result of the project and whether or not these changes are consistent with the project objectives. Even if the impact of project actions on fish and other aquatic organisms is ignored, sponsors need to answer questions concerning impacts on substrate composition, bank stability, stream temperature, and the hydrograph. Site specific actions taken to alter the physical structure of a stream and to overcome a perceived problem often result in unintended consequences making it important to initiate actions only with a clear understanding of dynamics in the entire system. Actions at one site are only reasonable when taken with a complete understanding of their potential impact at other locations.

The ISRP is concerned that the focus of the project appears to have changed to development of bio-engineered instream structures. The project needs to return to its original purpose. That is "... increasing pool and spawning habitat quality and quantity through geomorphic stabilization, riparian bio-function restoration, increasing complexity, maintaining adequate flow, and reducing water temperature and sediment." The project needs to ensure reviewers that competent and experienced fluvial-geomorphologists have assisted in design, evaluation, and choice of projects that will provide a high probability for gaining geomorphic stability, and that sufficient change is possible to attain subbasin objectives for the system. These inputs should be in place before new actions are taken.

NMFS comments from the province review are consistent with the ISRP's view that bioengineering projects should be limited to "fine-tuning" once watershed function has been restored.

The ISRP requests responses to at least the following items.

1. What information is available to help assess whether or not the work that has been completed under this project has made any progress in reaching its objectives?

2. Can observed changes in the channel be attributed to project activities or did similar changes occur in other channels?

3. What assistance has been incorporated in the project from competent and experienced fluvial-geomorphologists?

4. What is the geomorphic basis for the projects that have been completed and proposed projects?

5. What is the basis for and the estimated probability that completed and proposed projects will attain desired channel conditions given the limitations imposed by alternative uses of the water and floodplain?

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