FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199604300: Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized John Gebhards

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199604300
Proposal Name: Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project
BPA Project Manager: Kenneth Kirkman
Agency, Institution or Organization: Nez Perce Tribe
Short Description: The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation and Enhancement (JCAPE) project is a small-scale (100,000 smolts) supplementation initiative integrated with a monitoring and evaluation program designed to prevent the extirpation of the Johnson Creek stock.
Information Transfer: A primary objective of the program, as a whole, is the dissemination of data and technology transfer. The project takes seriously the need to make primary data and meta data available within the region. This project will result in the collection of extremely valuable data given society’s monetary investment and the important management questions to be answered. Hence, the volume and complexity of information gathered through the monitoring and evaluation activities will need to be compiled and organized in a systematic manner. It will involve archiving monitoring data, integrating data from different co-manager M&E activities, and making the data accessible in local and regional databases. Reports for the JCAPE project are submitted to BPA and NOAA Fisheries to meet funding requirements and ESA Section 10 Permit reporting. In addition, project information is shared through presentations at regional meetings and at professional society meetings.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
John Gebhards Nez Perce Tribe P.O. Box 1942
McCall ID 83638
Ph: 208.634.5290
Fax: 208.634.4097
Email: johng@nezperce.org
Form Submitter JCAPE O&M Project Leader
All Assigned Contacts
John Gebhards Nez Perce Tribe P.O. Box 1942
McCall ID 83638
Ph: 208.634.5290
Fax: 208.634.4097
Email: johng@nezperce.org
Project Lead
JCAPE O&M Project Leader
Craig Rabe Nez Perce Tribe P.O. Box 1942
McCall, ID 83638
Ph: 208.634.5290
Fax: 208.634.4097
Email: craigr@nezperce.org
Project Lead
JCAPE M&E Project Leader

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Mountain Snake ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Salmon ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
44.5502 115.2900 Stream Johnson Creek Valley, Idaho Salmon Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer ESU

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Adult Salmon Trapped = 197; Broodstock selected = 75; Supplementation adult returns = 75; BY 2003 smolts released = 105,230. Redd Count = 56; Juveniles Trapped = 17,619; Juveniles PIT tagged = 12,049; Juvenile Population Estimate = 428,659;
2004 Adult Salmon Trapped = 338; Broodstock selected = 57; Supplementation adult returns = 111; BY 2002 smolts released = 112,870. Redd Count = 129; Juveniles Trapped = 92,513; Juveniles PIT tagged = 12,186; Juvenile Population Estimate = 195,591;
2003 Adult Salmon Trapped = 784; Broodstock selected = 79; Supplementation adult returns = 165; BY 2001 smolts released = 73,000. Redd Count = 362; Juveniles Trapped = 29,063; Juveniles PIT tagged = 12,132; Juvenile Population Estimate = 147,482;
2002 Adult Salmon Trapped = 1,192; Broodstock selected = 97; Supplementation adult returns = 392; BY 2000 smolts released = 57,390. Redd Count = 351; Juveniles Trapped = 37,389; Juveniles PIT tagged = 9,984; Juvenile Population Estimate = 21,544;
2001 Adult Salmon Trapped = 1,518; Broodstock selected = 149; Supplementation adult returns = 236. Redd Count = 387; Juveniles Trapped = 13,403; Juveniles PIT tagged = xx; Juvenile Population Estimate = 19,486;
2000 Adult Salmon Trapped = 152; Broodstock selected = 73; BY 1998 smolts released = 78,950. Redd Count = 33; Juveniles Trapped = 19,802; Juveniles PIT tagged = 8,057; Juvenile Population Estimate = 58,792;
1999 No adult trapping. No broodstock collected. Redd Count = 24; Juveniles Trapped = 15,064 Juvenile Population Estimate = 144,844;
1998 First year of trapping. Adult Salmon Trapped = 114; Broodstock selected = 54. Redd Count = 96; Juveniles Trapped = 9,008
1997 Project start up initiated. No field activities to report.
1996 [Accomplishment field left blank]

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
[Funding Source left blank] [no entry] Idaho Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit The University of Idaho conducts radio tag monitoring in the South Fork Salmon River watershed of radio tags that they implant in adults at FCRPS facilities. This provides spawning locations and migration timing data. We utilize their tags to quantify if any impedance occurs from the adult weir on Johnson Creek.
Other: Lower Snake River Compensation Program [no entry] Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Hatchery Evaluations The Nez Perce Tribe Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Hatchery Evaluations have been collecting data in the SFSR since 1991. Salmon carcass recoveries in the SFSR have allowed estimates of introgression of hatchery stocks into natural spawning areas of Secesh River, SFSR, and Johnson Creek. This project will provide a better estimate of straying to determine the level of introgression.
BPA 198201300 Coded-Wire Tag Recovery This project assists the Coded Wire Tag Recovery program. While participating in redd surveys, snouts are collected from fish of suspected hatchery origin. The snouts are sent to the IDFG for CWT retrieval.
BPA 198335000 Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery O&M The JCAPE project shares knowledge with the NPT Hatchery O&M on development of NATURES incubation and rearing techniques, production operations, and results from monitoring and evaluation studies.
BPA 198712700 Smolt Monitoring By Non-Federal Agencies This project will PIT-tag wild/natural fish that may be used by the Comparative Survival Rate (CSS) study to develop a long-term index of transport survival rate (SAR) to in-river survival rate (SAR) for Snake River hatchery and wild/natural spring and summer chinook smolts. These performance measures are used for comparisons between up-river and down-river stocks. This proposed project will provide enough PIT-tagged fish for inclusion in the CSS evaluations to make statistically sound inferences about FCRPS passage survival. The increase in the number of PIT-tagged fish this project provides will aid in additional evaluations of the transported versus bypassed and undetected fish.
BPA 198909802 Salmon Studies Idaho Rivers NPT Johnson Creek is a treatment stream used by ISS, and the JCAPE project conducts research activities according to the ISS study design
BPA 199005500 Id Steelhead M&E Studies JCAPE provides life history data through a PIT tag marking program that is used by this project to evaluate the feasibility of using artificial production to increase natural steelhead populations and to collect baseline life history, genetic, and disease data from natural steelhead populations.
BPA 199107300 Idaho Natural Production Monitoring The Idaho Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation monitors trends in chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations in the Salmon River. We intend to work in conjunction with this project, the NPT ISS Secesh River project, and the IDFG ISS upper South Fork Salmon River project. Additional abundance estimates and emigration timing data will be collected. This data will also be used for comparison evaluations with the Nez Perce Tribe Imnaha River Steelhead Evaluation project.
BPA 199701501 Imnaha R Smolt Monitoring NPT The JCAPE project works in conjunction with the Imnaha Smolt and Adult Monitoring Program to develop methods and techniques to monitor tributary and subbasin specific SARs and R/S ratios.
BPA 199703800 Listed Stock Chinook Salmon Gamete Preservation The Salmonid Gamete Preservation Project collects and preserves male steelhead and chinook gametes from wild and hatchery fish from the Salmon and Snake River Basin tributaries. Johnson Creek is one of the critical streams that provide a significant portion of the total wild gametes preserved every year.
BPA 199800702 Grand Ronde Supp Lostine O&M/M&E The JCAPE project shares knowledge with the Grand Ronde Supplementation project (O&M/M&E) on development of NATURES incubation and rearing techniques, production operations, and results from monitoring and evaluation studies.
BPA 199801005 Pittsburg Landing Fall Chinook The JCAPE project shares knowledge on development of NATURES incubation and rearing techniques, production operations, and results from monitoring and evaluation studies.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS Although not a research objective, it is imperative that planning and communication occur for the successful implementation of the JCAPE program. An annual Statement of Work (SOW) will guide activities for the M&E and O&M components and will be based on frameworks presented in the JCAPE M&E Plan and Annual Operating Plan and integrated into the PISCES format. We will implement a five-year review process for incorporating JCAPE M&E information into the adaptive management process. Salmon (1B4) Monitor and evaluate program effectiveness to enable adaptive management...(RM&E Section) Data management and information dissemination are critical p. 21; 138
DESCRIBE STATUS & TRENDS OF POPULATIONS & HABITAT Stock status and performance can be evaluated only with respect to the properties of the natural environment in which the population is found. We will characterize abiotic features of stream habitat and its use by aquatic organisms, specifically chinook salmon. We will implement the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sampling framework, a statistically based and spatially explicit sampling design to quantify status and trends in stream and riparian habitats. Salmon (1B4) Monitor and evaluate program effectiveness...(2A7) Evaluate effectiveness of ongoing programs...(3C1-4) Quantify population specific abundance, SAR, productivity, reproductive success... p. 21; 24-25
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION The key performance measure is progeny-per-parent ratio (P:P) quantified within Johnson Creek for natural-origin fish and hatchery-origin fish independently. This is a derived value. Calculation of P:P relies on annual run reconstructions and requires quantification of adult abundance to Johnson Creek (escapement), index of spawner of abundance (redd counts), spawner abundance (spawner), fish per redd, hatchery fraction, age class structure, age-at-return, adult spawner sex ratio, prespawning mortality, and in-tributary harvest. We propose to use microsatellite-based parentage assignment and exclusion analyses to determine the reproductive success of wild, natural, and supplementation origin spring/summer Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. Doing so will inform management decisions regarding supplementation by quantitatively evaluating the long and short-term effects of supplementation on production and productivity. The key performance measures to determine and compare the spawning distribution of hatchery and natural origin Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek is adult spawner spatial distribution of female carcasses. Two primary performance measures describing life stage specific survival rates are examined; juvenile emigrant survival to Lower Granite Dam and smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) for natural-origin fish and hatchery produced fish in Johnson Creek. An additional (derived) performance measure of smolts per redd is used to index population productivity. Salmon (1A2) Determine pop. SAR's; (2A1&2) Preserve genetics & continue ongoing programs in supplementation streams; (3A2) Determine juv. or smolt per female (3C1-4) Determine pop. abund., SAR, productivity, & rep. success on index streams pp.23-25
MAINTAIN LIFE HISTORY TRAITS AND GENETIC DIVERSITY A suite of four performance measures is used to monitor life history characteristics of natural-origin adults and test for changes due to hatchery supplementation. Key performance measures are age-at-return, size-at-return, sex ratios, and adult run-timing. A suite of three performance measures is used to monitor life history characteristics of hatchery and natural-origin juveniles and test for divergence of the hatchery production group from natural production characteristics. Key performance measures are age-at-emigration, size-at-emigration, and emigration timing. A variety of performance measures will be used to document genetic effects of supplementation on the Johnson Creek natural population. This will be accomplished by characterizing the genetic structure and variability within the population using microsatellite analyses. Indices of genetic differentiation will be calculated and patterns of genetic change will be examined through time in the population. Salmon (1B2-1B4) Implement additional & innovative propagation techniques & use M&E to assess program effectiveness; (2A1) Preserve genetic integrity of existing wild stocks; (2A2) Continue ongoing/new programs in supplementation areas... p. 21; 23-24
MINIMIZE NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF HATCHERY PROGRAM Data is generated from the proportion of carcasses recovered that are of hatchery-origin in each South Fork Salmon River stream over time. The interest of managers is whether the proportion over years is larger than a preset threshold (e.g. 10%, as defined in VSP document by McElhany et al. 2000). Hatchery/natural composition is determined from carcass recoveries during multiple pass extensive area spawning ground surveys. Key measures related to impacts on resident and/or anadromous fish are whether the presence of the adult weir impedes the upstream/downstream movement of these fishes. Salmon (1B2-1B4) Implement additional & innovative propagation techniques & use M&E to assess program effectiveness; (2A1) Preserve genetic integrity of existing wild stocks; (2A2) Continue ongoing/new programs in supplementation areas... pp. 23-24
OPTIMIZE PRODUCTION EFFECTIVENESS The key measure is adult abundance partitioned into spawners and broodstock components by origin relative to management thresholds. We will determine whether the escapement estimate is larger than the escapement goal pre-set by managers. Key measures related to fish health focus on prevalence of infectious diseases in terms of pathogen presence within a population and the frequency of disease outbreaks. Salmon (3C1) Quantify population specific adult and juvenile abundance information...(3C3) Determine population productivity...(3C4) Measure reproductive success through parentage analysis p. 25

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
01: Produce Hatchery Fish JCAPE Supplementation (O&M) Produce Supplementation Fish (up to 110,000 summer chinook salmon) for Enhancement of Johnson Creek 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $967,400
Biological Objectives Metrics
MINIMIZE NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF HATCHERY PROGRAM
OPTIMIZE PRODUCTION EFFECTIVENESS
* Broodstock collection: # of non-clip (natural origin) fish: 40 pairs
* Production: # smolts released from program: 110000

02: Maintain Hatchery Maintain Remote Site Hatchery Facilities (O&M) Maintain both the adult weir in Johnson Creek and adult holding facilities at the S. F. Salmon River adult holding facility. This involves the replacement of parts of the picket weir and trap (pickets, picket stringers, picket braces, trap box componenets, gravel bags, etc.) and for the portable adult holding tank (tank, tank cover, alarms, pump, water pipes, etc.). 5/15/2007 9/30/2009 $48,370
Biological Objectives Metrics
MINIMIZE NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF HATCHERY PROGRAM
No Metrics for this Work Element

03: Enhance Nutrients Instream Nutrient Enhancement in Johnson Creek (O&M) Return 80 brood stock carcasses each year to Johnson Creek for Nutrient Enhancement 8/1/2007 9/10/2009 $13,820
Biological Objectives Metrics
MINIMIZE NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF HATCHERY PROGRAM
No Metrics for this Work Element

04: Install Fish Monitoring Equipment Install Screw Traps and Adult Weirs (M&E) Install a rotary drum screw trap on the mainstem Johnson Creek located approximately 6.3 km above the confluence of Johnson Creek and the East Fork South Fork Salmon to collect and mark natural origin juvenile summer Chinook salmon as they migrate from rearing areas. The screw trap will be attached to a cable suspension system that is anchored by gabion baskets on either shore, which will enable the trap to be moved side to side and upstream/downstream depending upon fishing conditions, or to a position that will provide optimum fishing during all flow conditions. Trap installation timing will depend upon flow and temperature conditions, but will typically occur between March and April. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $18,050
Biological Objectives Metrics
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
No Metrics for this Work Element

05: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Collect DNA, Scale, Snout & Fin Ray Samples from Juvenile & Adult Chinook Salmon (M&E) Collect biological samples form adult and juvenile chinook salmon for use in aging, origin determination, and genetic studies comparing natural and hatchery fish. 10/1/2007 9/30/2009 $90,250
Biological Objectives Metrics
DESCRIBE STATUS & TRENDS OF POPULATIONS & HABITAT
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
MAINTAIN LIFE HISTORY TRAITS AND GENETIC DIVERSITY
Primary R, M, and E Type: Status and Trend Monitoring

06: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Conduct Redd Counts, Prespawning, and Carcass Surveys (M&E) Conduct redd counts and carcass surveys of adult summer Chinook on Johnson Creek and Burnt Log Creek (a tributary to Johnson Creek). Redd counts will be used as a a measure of adult escapement. Record redd locations and document the number of live fish and their origin (hatchery or natural) during each survey. Collect pertinent biological information (length, sex, DNA, retained eggs, marks/tags) from all Chinook salmon carcasses interrogated. In addition, remove various structures from carcasses for aging, collect length, sex, DNA, egg retention information, and examine for the presence of fin clips, coded wire tags, radio tags, VI tags, and other tags. Remove snouts from carcasses containing coded wire for laboratory analysis. 8/1/2007 9/30/2009 $200,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
DESCRIBE STATUS & TRENDS OF POPULATIONS & HABITAT
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
Primary R, M, and E Type: Status and Trend Monitoring

07: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Monitor Johnson Creek Adult Escapement and Estimate Adult Production (M&E) Use an adult mark-recapture study and evaluation to monitor and estimate natural and hatchery adult production in Johhnson Creek. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $145,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
Primary R, M, and E Type: Status and Trend Monitoring

08: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Operate Juvenile Screw Traps (M&E) Operate juvenile screw trap to estimate the number of summer Chinook salmon parr, pre-smolt, and smolts migrating out of Johnson Creek. Record data on fork length, weight, number of juveniles captured, and marked fish recaptured to estimate brood year production. This will provide annual estimates used to test the effect of supplementation over time. This WE will be conducted concurrently with WE 158 to provide marked fish to compute migration estimates. This work element includes post-season repair and maintenance to screw traps and other field equipment as needed. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $330,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
No Metrics for this Work Element

09: Mark/Tag Animals Mark Juvenile and Adult Chinook Salmon (M&E) Utilize the latest in PIT tag and marking techologies to mark juvenile summer Chinook salmon for use in survival and juvenile fish estimation studies. In addition marks will be utilized as a distinguishing mark for hatchery fish for comparisons between natural and hatchery fish. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $380,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
DESCRIBE STATUS & TRENDS OF POPULATIONS & HABITAT
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
MAINTAIN LIFE HISTORY TRAITS AND GENETIC DIVERSITY
MINIMIZE NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF HATCHERY PROGRAM
OPTIMIZE PRODUCTION EFFECTIVENESS
Primary R, M, and E Type: Status and Trend Monitoring

10: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation for BPA and NOAA Fisheries (M&E) Cooperate with BPA environmental personnel to ensure continued compliance documentation are being completed 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $18,050
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

11: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation for BPA and NOAA Fisheries (O&M) Prepare necessary documents as required by BPA and NOAA Fisheries for NEPA and ESA compliance for the JCAPE O&M Project Activities. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $27,640
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

12: Analyze/Interpret Data Conduct genetic parentage analysis to determine and compare relative reproductive success of hatchery and naturally produced Chinook salmon (M&E). We propose to use microsatellite-based parentage assignment and exclusion analyses to determine the reproductive success of wild, natural, and supplementation origin spring/summer Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. Doing so will inform management decisions regarding supplementation by quantitatively evaluating the long and short-term effects of supplementation on production and productivity. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $337,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
No Metrics for this Work Element

13: Analyze/Interpret Data Evaluate Effects of Supplementation Using a Performance Measure Evaluation (M&E) Evaluation of supplementation program through a performance measure evaluation. Milestones below will be separated out into those six categories with performance measures evaluated in the context of supplemenation effects on the natural population in Johnson Creek. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $162,400
Biological Objectives Metrics
DESCRIBE STATUS & TRENDS OF POPULATIONS & HABITAT
MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE NATURAL PRODUCTION
MAINTAIN LIFE HISTORY TRAITS AND GENETIC DIVERSITY
MINIMIZE NEGATIVE IMPACTS OF HATCHERY PROGRAM
OPTIMIZE PRODUCTION EFFECTIVENESS
Primary R, M, and E Type: Action Effectiveness Research

14: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Implement the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) (M&E) We will characterize abiotic features of stream habitat and its use by aquatic organisms, specifically chinook salmon. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $234,700
Biological Objectives Metrics
DESCRIBE STATUS & TRENDS OF POPULATIONS & HABITAT
No Metrics for this Work Element

15: Manage and Administer Projects Manage and Administer JCAPE O&M Project Prepare annual Statement of Work that identifies project objectives and tasks. Identify and outline methods to abide by tribal policies and procedures as required for project operational, safety, personnel, finance, and administrative actions. Prepare Spending Plans, Inventories, accrual reporting, workshops, meetings, training, provincial review package preparation, and new proposal preparation and submittal. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $96,740
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

16: Manage and Administer Projects Manage and Administer JCAPE M&E Project Statement of Work, Budgets, Spending Plans, Inventories, accrual reporting, workshops, meetings, training, provencial review package preparation, and new proposal preparation and submittal. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $324,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

17: Produce Plan Update and submit Annual Operating Plans (O&M) Update Annual Operating Plan (AOP) and Hatchery Genetic Management Plan (HGMP) and submit to NOAA Fisheries as a condition of the JCAPE O&M ESA Section 10 Permit (Permit 1250). 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $13,820
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

18: Coordination Coordinate JCAPE O&M Activities (O&M) Coordinate with project cooperators and regulatory agencies for McCall Fish Hatchery Operations and maintenance, and NOAA Fisheries on ESA Section 10 Permit activities. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $41,460
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

19: Coordination Coordinate JCAPE M&E Activities (M&E) Provide inter- and intra-agency coordination and cooperation. In addition, coordinate with state and tribal hatcheries integrated with the JCAPE project. Also includes day to day operations of the project for administration, logistics, and operations of the project to collect, analyze, summarize, and report data, results, and conclusions. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $37,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

20: Submit/Acquire Data Manage PIT Tag Files (M&E) Upload all juvenile Chinook salmon PIT tag release files to PTAGIS throughout the field season within 3 days of tagging. Retrieve interrogated PIT-tag detections from Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams to estimate minimum survival estimates to Lower Granite Dam and lower dams if possible. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $36,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

21: Produce Annual Report Prepare and Submit Annual Reports (O&M) Prepare and submit Brood Year and Adult Salmon Run Reports on JCAPE O&M project activities. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $124,380
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

22: Produce Annual Report Prepare and Submit Annual Report (M&E) Prepare draft annual report for corresponding years (2007, 2008, & 2009). Reports will be submitted as final January 31st of each subsequent year 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $155,450
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

23: Produce Status Report Produce Status Reports (O&M) Produce bi-weekly summaries on field activites and quarterly reports. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $27,550
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

24: Produce Status Report Produce Status Reports (M&E) Prepare update reports that are submitted on a quarterly basis within 15 days at end of quarters ending in March, June, September, and December that provides information on project activites for the previous quarter. 10/1/2007 9/30/2009 $18,050
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

25: Produce Pisces Status Report Produce PISCES Status Reports (O&M) Produce PISCES Status reports for O&M program 10/1/2007 12/31/2009 $7,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

26: Produce Pisces Status Report Produce PISCES Status Reports (M&E) Produce PISCES Status reports for M&E program 10/1/2007 12/31/2009 $7,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
No Metrics for this Work Element

27: Outreach and Education Public Outreach and Fisheries Education (O&M) Participate in a number of efforts to educate or communicate with the public (10 to 15 presentations/tours per year to schools, YCC work crews, scouting groups, and daily interactions with the general public in classrooms and at field sites and presentations at meetings/conferences). 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $13,820
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
* # of general public reached: 20-30
* # of students reached: 15-20
* # of teachers reached: 5-10

28: Outreach and Education Public Outreach and Fisheries Education (M&E) Presentation and use of the project to educate the general public, Optimist Club, Rotary Club, local Chambers of Commerce and other interested parties on how research is used to answer management questions and how research projects benefit the local economies. This work element also addresses portions of work elements 118, 119, and 161. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $18,050
Biological Objectives Metrics
COORDINATE & COMMUNICATE ACTIVITIES & FINDINGS
* # of students reached: 35 students reached


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel 9.55 total FTE's per year $444,480 $468,569 $492,930
Fringe Benefits fringe for 9.55 FTE's per year $202,719 $208,500 $214,485
Supplies Supplies and materials for O&M and M&E programs $27,125 $28,610 $30,199
Travel Travel includes per diem and vehicle costs (5 project vehicles through GSA) $40,836 $43,016 $45,335
Capital Equipment no capital equipment costs $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Overhead includes indirect rate costs, rent and communication costs for project $253,329 $265,420 $278,255
Other costs for tags (PIT, CWT and VIE) for M&E component and land owner lease agreement $72,240 $75,875 $79,696
Other costs for genetic tissue analysis (M&E) $15,750 $16,538 $17,364
Other costs for genetic parentage analysis (M&E) $143,000 $145,000 $49,000
Other costs associated with EMAP probabalistic sampling (M&E) $75,522 $78,472 $80,735
Totals $1,275,001 $1,330,000 $1,287,999

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$3,893,000
Total Work Element budget$3,893,000

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$1,365,278 $1,447,195 Totals are for both O&M and M&E costs
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
FY 2010 - O&M costs = $516,220 FY 2011 - O&M costs = $547,000
 
Termination Date Comments
TBD TBD
 
Final Deliverables
TBD

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
Location:
Province: No Change
Subbasin: No Change
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments:


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$1,009,770
FY 2008 Budget
$1,009,770
FY 2009 Budget
$1,009,770
Total NPCC Rec
$3,029,310
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: Fund at current production level (100,000 fish). Address ISRP concerns regarding monitoring results during contracting, also see Programmatc Issue: supplementation m&e.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$1,009,770
FY 2008 Budget
$1,009,770
FY 2009 Budget
$1,009,770
Total NPCC Rec
$3,029,310
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:
NPCC Staff Comments: Note: fundable for one year at current production level (100,000). Address ISRP concerns during contracting

Local or MSRT Comments: Referenced as currently Implementing BiOp UPA in June 1, 2006 Delwiche (BPA) letter to Whiting (NPCC). Revised request results from deferring genetic parentage analysis and dropping EMAP sampling of habitat and juveniles.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable in part
NPCC Comments: For the response loop, the project sponsor submitted a letter from BPA that listed BPA's existing ESA implementation commitments and an estimation of new work anticipated to be a priority in addressing limiting factors for ESA-listed fish. The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project is listed in a table attached to the letter. The BPA letter does not address the scientific issues raised by the ISRP in its review. The ISRP recommendation of "Fundable in part" from the preliminary review stands.

The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project is Fundable in Part for one year (FY07) with subsequent annual funding contingent upon reporting of monitoring results and evidence of adaptive management decisions justified by the results. Sponsors also need to analyze and report on extinction risk. The annual report should be reviewed by an independent team.

The ISRP's preliminary review comments (June 1, 2006) were:

This is a long and complex proposal that richly documents its history including numerous iterative reviews by the ISRP. Significant exchanges have occurred between the project sponsors and the ISRP since the late 1990s and the removal of Johnson Creek from the ISS control stream status.

The goal of the Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project is to reduce the demographic risk of extirpation of the ESA listed Johnson Creek summer Chinook salmon and begin its recovery through supplementation while maintaining genetic diversity of the artificially propagated summer Chinook salmon population and the natural population. The sponsors hope to increase adult returns through increased juvenile survival and improved homing in order to preserve and recover the Johnson Creek salmon population. The ISRP has long been critical of this project for a variety of technical reasons. Most of these have been addressed through the above described iterative review exchanges.

A decision was made to initiate a supplementation program in Johnson Creek to increase the population size as it appeared to be at increasing demographic risk during the 1990s. Decision-makers must have concluded that removing Johnson Creek from the ISS study design would not compromise the objectives of the ISS. The current proposal redirects the Johnson Creek work to become an additional stand-alone assessment of supplementation. What is the reason for another stand-alone assessment?

The sponsors have provided an excellent summary of the results of their project to date. The proposal is well done. Proponents should be commended for reporting and making these data available. The next step is to make adaptive management decisions on the appropriateness and scale of further supplementation. This discussion is absent from the proposal.

The important data that the sponsors provide calls into question whether the supplementation program is providing any demographic benefit or whether it may be creating a demographic loss (page 24, Table 10). For both the 1998 and 2000 brood years, the female-to-female replacement rate was lower for supplementation than for natural spawning (6.99 vs. 6.95 for 1998, and 4.46 vs. 2.88 for 2000). In both these cases, more fish would have returned had the collected females been permitted to spawn in the wild than by bringing them into the hatchery.

With results to date, the ISRP does not currently see justification for supplementing Johnson Creek. Moreover, this project could result in harm to the wild population based on the data reported. What are the limits to broodstock mining? Continuing the project with adequate monitoring may only be valuable in better understanding the problems with supplementation.

The proponents provide appropriate evidence that the summer Chinook population in Johnson Creek has decreased over the past 50 years. The purpose of supplementing the population is to reduce a risk of extirpation of the population. What is needed to more fully justify the action is a quantitative assessment of the likelihood of extirpation within specific timeframes. This should be followed by a presentation of the level of demographic support from supplementation that would be required to reduce this risk; i.e., how much supplementation at specified performance levels would lead to a 10, 20, 30, 40% etc. reduction in the risk of extirpation? This provides a context for comparing the project to alternatives. If for example, the population has a 50% chance of extirpation in the next 25 years, will we only reduce that chance to 40% under the expected performance of the supplementation program? Finally, this type of analysis would logically lead to clear performance thresholds by which to judge the artificial production portion of the program.

While it is clear (p. 29) that natural origin adults are used for broodstock, it is not clear whether adults of hatchery origin are also used for brood stock purposes. This should be clarified. Supplementation in its strictest sense (RASP) would rely solely on natural origin adults.

This project has changed from what it was first intended to be. It is now viewed as a stand-alone assessment of supplementation rather than as a part of the ISS assessment program. It appears that several issues that were contentious in the recent past have been resolved. Benefits of the program are unknown at this point, but objectives seem vague in terms of reducing the risk of extirpation - by how much, in what timeframe. They also are vague with respect to adaptive management loops to modify, expand, or terminate the supplementation.

The monitoring indicates they are adding contrasts between supplemented and unsupplemented reference streams, but no detail for this contrast is provided. It is still unclear just how supplemented and unsupplemented "reference" streams will be compared. The reliance on contrasts of supplementation with natural fish within Johnson Creek are informative but not sufficient to evaluate demographic or fitness benefits or losses from supplementation. Evaluation for the project is dependent on suitable data from reference streams, but available streams are not free from stray fish from adjacent supplementation programs.

The sponsors have made information from the project available for independent review.

The identification and magnitude of adverse outcomes for non-focal species is unknown.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable in part
NPCC Comments: This is a long and complex proposal that richly documents its history including numerous iterative reviews by the ISRP. Significant exchanges have occurred between the project sponsors and the ISRP since the late 1990s and the removal of Johnson Creek from the ISS control stream status.

The goal of the Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement project is to reduce the demographic risk of extirpation of the ESA listed Johnson Creek summer Chinook salmon and begin its recovery through supplementation while maintaining genetic diversity of the artificially propagated summer Chinook salmon population and the natural population. The sponsors hope to increase adult returns through increased juvenile survival and improved homing in order to preserve and recover the Johnson Creek salmon population. The ISRP has long been critical of this project for a variety of technical reasons. Most of these have been addressed through the above described iterative review exchanges.

The Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project is FUNDABALE IN PART for one year (FY07) with subsequent annual funding contingent upon reporting of monitoring results and evidence of adaptive management decisions justified by the results. Sponsors also need to analyze and report on extinction risk. The annual report should be reviewed by an independent team.

A decision was made to initiate a supplementation program in Johnson Creek to increase the population size as it appeared to be at increasing demographic risk during the 1990s. Decision-makers must have concluded that removing Johnson Creek from the ISS study design would not compromise the objectives of the ISS. The current proposal redirects the Johnson Creek work to become an additional stand-alone assessment of supplementation. What is the reason for another stand-alone assessment?

Sponsors have provided an excellent summary of the results of their project to date. The proposal is well done. Proponents should be commended for reporting and making these data available. The next step is to make adaptive management decisions on the appropriateness and scale of further supplementation. This discussion is absent from the proposal.

The important data sponsors provide calls into question whether the supplementation program is providing any demographic benefit or whether it may be creating a demographic loss (page 24, Table 10). For both the 1998 and 2000 brood years, the female-to-female replacement rate was lower for supplementation than for natural spawning (6.99 vs. 6.95 for 1998, and 4.46 vs. 2.88 for 2000). In both these cases, more fish would have returned had the collected females been permitted to spawn in the wild than by bringing them into the hatchery.

With results to date, the ISRP does not currently see justification for supplementing Johnson Creek. Moreover, this project could result in harm to the wild population based on the data reported. What are the limits to broodstock mining? Continuing the project with adequate monitoring may only be valuable in better understanding the problems with supplementation.

Proponents provide appropriate evidence that the summer Chinook population in Johnson Creek has decreased over the past 50 years. The purpose of supplementing the population is to reduce a risk of extirpation of the population. What is needed to more fully justify the action is a quantitative assessment of the likelihood of extirpation within specific timeframes. This should be followed by a presentation of the level of demographic support from supplementation that would be required to reduce this risk; i.e., how much supplementation at specified performance levels would lead to a 10, 20, 30, 40% etc. reduction in the risk of extirpation? This provides a context for comparing the project to alternatives. If for example, the population has a 50% chance of extirpation in the next 25 years, will we only reduce that chance to 40% under the expected performance of the supplementation program? Finally, this type of analysis would logically lead to clear performance thresholds by which to judge the artificial production portion of the program.

While it is clear (p. 29) that natural origin adults are used for broodstock, it is not clear whether adults of hatchery origin are also used for brood stock purposes. This should be clarified. Supplementation in its strictest sense (RASP) would rely solely on natural origin adults.

This project has changed from what it was first intended to be. It is now viewed as a stand-alone assessment of supplementation rather than as a part of the ISS assessment program. It appears that several issues that were contentious in the recent past have been resolved.

Benefits of the program are unknown at this point, but objectives seem clearly described. As noted above, however, the objectives are vague in terms of reducing the risk of extirpation - by how much, in what timeframe – and are vague with respect to adaptive management loops to modify, expand, or terminate the supplementation.

The monitoring indicates they are adding contrasts between supplemented and unsupplemented reference streams, but no detail for this contrast is provided. It is still unclear just how supplemented and unsupplemented "reference" streams will be compared.

The reliance on contrasts of supplementation with natural fish within Johnson Creek are informative but not sufficient to evaluate demographic or fitness benefits or losses from supplementation. Evaluation for the project is dependent on suitable data from reference streams, but available streams are not free from stray fish from adjacent supplementation programs.

Sponsors have made information from the project available for independent review.

Identification and magnitude of adverse outcomes for non-focal species is unknown.

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