FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199608000: Ne Oregon Wldf Proj (Npt) Precious Lands

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 9, 2006 Finalized Angela Sondenaa

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199608000
Proposal Name: Ne Oregon Wldf Proj (Npt) Precious Lands
BPA Project Manager: Joe Deherrera
Agency, Institution or Organization: Nez Perce Tribe
Short Description: This project provides an estimated 20,015 Habitat Units for mitigation credits for the Lower Snake Dam complex. It provides 16,286 acres of wildlife habitat and protects 16.6 miles of listed steelhead habitat within the lower Grande Ronde Subbasin.
Information Transfer: Data generated from this project will be shared with regional and national databases such as those maintained by the Declining Amphibians Populations Taskforce, and Partners in Flight to allow the wider scientific community to benefit from our work. Annual and scientific reports will be posted to the Nez Perce Tribes website at http://www.nezperce.org. Oral presentations and poster displays will also be used to inform selected audiences about project activities. Handouts such as a bird checklist, project maps, and noxious weed profiles, have also been prepared for interested members of the public.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Angela Sondenaa Nez Perce Tribe Main St. P.O. Box 365
Lapwai ID 83540
Ph: 208.843.7372
Fax: 208.843.2427
Email: angelas@nezperce.org
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Loren Kronemann Nez Perce Tribe PO Box 365
Lapwai, ID, 83540
Ph: 208-843-7372
Fax: 208-843-2427
Email: kronemannla@nezperce.org
Supervisor
Angela Sondenaa Nez Perce Tribe Main St. P.O. Box 365
Lapwai ID 83540
Ph: 208.843.7372
Fax: 208.843.2427
Email: angelas@nezperce.org
Form Submitter
Project Lead

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Blue Mountain ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Grande Ronde ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
46 00 00 117 15 00 Buford Cr. Precious Lands Wildlife Area. Buford Parcel on the OR/WA border. Asotin, Washington Grande Ronde Yes
45 56 00 117 07 30 Joseph Cr Precious Lands Wildlife Area. Lower Joseph Creek and tributaries. Wallowa, Oregon Grande Ronde Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
All Wildlife
All Resident Fish
Steelhead Snake River ESU
Bighorn Sheep, Elk, Spalding's Catchfly, Neotropical Migrant Landbirds

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Purchased 961 acres in Joseph Cr. Third year of small mammal monitoring completed. 220 acres of weed spraying. 1/4 mile new fence constructed. Initiated 2 yr USFWS grant to survey rare plants. Silene spaldingii seed collected for genetic conservation
2004 Documented Threatened Silene spaldingii population in Joseph Cr. 10 acres of thinning and pile burning in ponderosa stands. Water system improvements at Buford. 0.75 miles of trail improvement in Tamarack Cr., 1.2 miles of trail improvement in Rock Cr.
2003 Noxious weeds sprayed on 700 acres. 2,000 Basin Wild Rye plugs, 100 aspen, and 500 Ponderosa pine trees planted. Installed 1 water trough. 12 acres of pine thinned. Owl survey documented 8 species. Rare Oregon Bolandra plants found. HEP Report done
2002 Draft Mgmt Plan Completed. Discovered large Crupina infestation. Planted 50 aspen trees. Thinned 5 acres of ponderosa pine. Installed corral at Buford cabin. Investigated and prosecuted elk poaching case. Data collection for baseline HEP completed.
2001 Installed new bridge decking on access Rd. Treated 200 acres starthistle, 30 acres scotch thistle, 1 acre teasel, and 0.5 acre knapweed. Repaired 2.5 miles of fence. Removed 0.5 miles old fence. Planted 30 acres with native grass and forbs.
2000 Purchased 3,472 acres in Joseph Cr using 193 existing acres as partial trade. Sprayed 200 acres of starthistle. Built 4 miles of new fence. Removed 2.5 miles of old fence. Initiated baseline HEP assessment.
1999 Purchased 1,540 acres of land in Buford Cr. Established 8 landbird monitoring sites. Conducted bat sampling; 6 species found. Replaced propane tank at Tamarack. Small mammal inventory completed; 276 specimens deposited at Burke Museum.
1998 Purchased 158 acres of land in Joseph Cr. Created GIS vegetation cover maps. Repaired staff facilities at Basin and Tamarack. Established fire protective agreement with Dregon Dept. of Forestry. Repaired 1 mile of fence.
1997 Completed aerial photography of purchased land. Rebuilt access road after major winter flooding.
1996 Purchased 10,306 acres of land in the Joseph Creek Watershed

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 199402700 Grande Ronde Model Ws Habitat The Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program takes a total ecosystem approach to habitat recovery and employs both passive and active restoration techniques to achieve its goals. This type of subbasin wide restoration effort is enhanced by having core protected areas like Precious Lands from which to build. Together, such projects create healthier ecosystems over a much broader geographic area so have a higher probability of achieving meaningful changes in ecosystem function.
BPA 199702500 Wallowa County/Nez Perce Salmo This project culminated in a plan to restore and maintain habitat for Chinook salmon and other salmonids in Wallowa County, Oregon. The Precious Lands Project compliments and helps implement many of the habitat restoration objectives outlined in the Wallowa County-Nez Perce Tribe Salmon Habitat Recovery Plan. Specifically, it takes a wholistic approach to watershed restoration by working to improve vegetation and hydrologic function in both upland areas and the riparian zone. The Precious Lands Project is also working to improve riparian vegetation, reduce sedimentation and mitigate high water temperatures which are all identified as high priority activities in the Salmon Habitat Recovery Plan.
BPA 200002100 Ladd Marsh The Ladd Marsh project strives to protect and restore wetland habitats within the upper Grande Ronde Subbasin. This project in association with the Precious Lands Wildlife Area are the only BPA funded projects in the Grande Ronde Subbasin designed specifically to mitigate for wildlife losses associated with construction of the Federal hydro system. Both projects aim to restore key habitats and ecological processes within the subbasin.
BPA 200104300 Acquire 27,000 Camp Cr Ranch This project lies largely within the Imnaha subbasin and represents another addition to the growing list of wildlife management areas located in canyon habitats of Wallowa County, Oregon. It compliments the Precious Lands Project by also managing and restoring threatened grassland and prairie ecosystems and the species that depend on them, including populations of the Threatened plant Silene spaldingii. These and other wildlife management areas culminate in a series of interconnected habitats that provide refugia and linkage corridors for important keystone species such as elk, bighorn sheep, and large predators.
Other: ODFW None Wenaha Wildlife Management Area This site is managed by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and lies approximately 13 miles to the west of the Precious Lands Project. Both projects provide winter habitat for big game animals, and strive to enhance habitat values for native fish and wildlife species. Management of low elevation grassland and associated riparian areas are priority activities.
Other: WDFW None Chief Joseph Wildlife Management Area The Chief Joseph Wildlife Area is managed by WDFW, and includes 13,415 acres of canyon grasslands located along Joseph Creek in the lower Grande Ronde watershed. Like Precious Lands, this Wildlife Area has a management objective to provide quality habitat for elk, bighorn sheep, and other native species. Weed control and riparian protection activities are also an integral part of habitat management. This WMA lies approximately 3 miles to the northeast of the Precious Lands Project. They are linked physically by a large parcel of Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land that provides a travel corridor for area wildlife. In conjunction, these two wildlife areas provide over 29,600 acres of canyon grassland and riparian habitat within the lower Grande Ronde.
Other: WDFW None Asotin Creek Wildlife Area The Asotin Creek Wildlife Area is managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This WMA occupies approximately 30,000 acres in the upper Asotin Creek subbasin of the Blue Mountain Province. Management on this WMA is similar to the Precious Lands Project in that it emphasizes habitat management to benefit elk, bighorn sheep, Snake River steelhead, and other species. This project receives partial funding support from BPA.
Other: Multi-Agency None Tri-State Weed Management Area Noxious weed infestations are a growing concern within the grassland ecosystems of northeast Oregon and adjacent Idaho and were identified as a limiting factor for wildlife in all Subbasin Plans within the Blue Mountain Province (Asotin County Conservation District, 2004; Ecovista, 2004a, 2004b; Nowak, 2004). The Precious Lands Area Manager is an active participant in both the Tri-State Weed Management Area, and the Lower Grande Ronde Noxious Weed Program. Both are cooperative efforts by government agencies, industry and private landowners to combat the growing threat of noxious weeds. Activities include information transfer, cooperative work projects, and funding opportunities. Participation in these efforts directly benefits the Precious Lands Project and the region by improving noxious weed control.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs Reduce elk/agriculture conflicts. Grande Ronde Protect unconverted winter range in good condition through easement or acquisition. Implement winter range forage improvement activities. 269
Channel Conditions To have a distribution of channel types and within channel habitat characteristics close to historic condition. Grande Ronde Improve density, condition, and species composition of riparian vegetation. Maintain Large woody debris. 260
Eastside Grasslands Increase the occurrence and condition of native grasslands. Grande Ronde Fund and coordinate weed control efforts including research and development of bio-control agents, and landowner education. Restore grassland function through reestablishment of native plant communities. Identify and protect wildlife habitat corridors. 268
Habitat Diversity Habitat diversity shall be restored as near as possible to historic condition as a result of restoring channel condition and riparian conditions. Grande Ronde Restore channel conditions. Restore riparian Conditions. See Biological Objectives already listed. 263
High & Low Water Temperatures Water temperature and dissolved oxygen conditions shall be restored as near as possible to historic conditions, as a result of restoring channel conditions, reduce sediment loads, improving riparian conditions, and improving low flow conditions. Grande Ronde Restore channel conditions. Reduce sediment loads. Improve riparian conditions. Improve low flow conditions. See Biological Objectives already listed. 263
Low Flow Conditions To enhance low flow conditions such that they mimic the natural hydrograph to the extent possible. Grande Ronde Improve riparian function and water storage by enhancing riparian vegetation and reestablishing beaver populations. Improve hydrologic function of forested watersheds through manipulation of tree species and density toward historic condition. 262-263
Pollutants Localized impacts due to pollutants are expected to be reduced as ongoing best management practices are implemented that will reduce inputs of pollutants across the landscape. Grande Ronde Exclude grazing in riparian areas. 264
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands Establish increasing trend in acreage and tree size for the type. Grande Ronde Protect extant habitat in good condition through acquisition. Restore forest function through use of prescribed fire and silvicultural treatments. Fund and coordinate weed control efforts. Identify and protect wildlife habitat corridors/links. 267
Quaking Aspen & Curleaf Mountain Mahogany Increase size and vigor of aspen and mahogany stands. Grande Ronde Conduct inventories and map existing aspen and mahogany stands. Actively plant aspen in appropriate habitats. 268
Riparian Conditions To have a distribution of riparian communities having a species composition, size, and structure appropriate for the channel type, and ecoregion. Grande Ronde Improve the density, condition and species composition of riparian vegetation through planting, seeding, and best management practices. 261-262
Sediment Conditions To have a distribution of sediment type and size structure appropriate for the channel type, geology, and ecoregion. Grande Ronde Exclude grazing in riparian areas. Vegetation re-establishment. Integrated noxious weed management. Implement minimum tillage practices. Improve upland vegetative condition. 261
Wetlands Protect existing wetlands and reestablish wetland and wet meadow complexes where feasible. Grande Ronde Protect extant habitat in good condition. Fund and coordinate weed control efforts. Restore riparian area function through livestock management, in-channel improvements, and vegetative enhancement. 268-269

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
01: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation NEPA, ESA and Cultural Resources Site Reviews Literature and on-site review of ESA species and/or culturally significant resources and areas associated with new fencing projects or other ground disturbing activities. Report will be used in making management decisions and in monitoring activities in relation to the Endangered Species Act, National Environmental Policy Act, the Antiquities Act, and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. 1/1/2007 6/1/2009 $39,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

02: Operate and Maintain Habitat/Passage Maintain Fences, Buildings, and Signs Maintain approximately 13 miles of existing barbed wire fence, three large informational signs, and numerous boundary markers. Fences are necessary to keep neighboring livestock from impacting soils, removing vegetation, and degrading riparian areas through trampling and nutrient inputs. New fences will be constructed as needed. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $206,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Eastside Grasslands
Pollutants
Riparian Conditions
Sediment Conditions
No Metrics for this Work Element

03: Improve/Relocate Road Road and Trail Maintenance and Improvement Routine road maintenance as well as improvements to internal roads on Buford Unit and in Basin Creek to reduce sediment and increase traction. Most work accomplished by mechanical means (using the project tractor) but some hand work will be needed for small sites. Work will be accomplished as needed and as it fits into other work obligations. Maintain and improve trails along Joseph, Tamarack, Broady, Bear and Rock Creeks. Brush removal and clearing will occur in the late spring and early summer and improvements to trail surface will occur during the summer and fall to minimize off-site movement of soil. Work will be accomplished largely by hand using power tools such as chainsaws, brush cutters, and rock drills. No earth-moving machinery will be used for trail work. Metrics associated with this work element includes approximately 4 miles of interior roads and 11 miles of trail. 3/1/2007 12/31/2009 $84,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Sediment Conditions
* # of road miles improved, upgraded, or restored: 15

04: Remove Debris Removal of old barbed wire fences Will be done as needed and as time and funding allow. Primary activities will include old fence removal throughout the project area. Previous owners did not remove old fence during new construction so there are miles of old fence that poses an entanglement hazard to wildlife and recreational users. By removing these hazards, the project area will provide better habitat for wintering elk herds. 3/1/2007 11/1/2009 $52,800
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
No Metrics for this Work Element

05: Provide Public Access/Information Provide for safe public access as well as outreach and education Post property boundaries, maintain informational signs, gates, etc. to enhance public access to the Project. Provide project information and outreach as opportunities arise such as International Migratory Bird Day, Nez Perce Culture Camp, Native American Awareness week, professional meetings, County Commissioner meetings, etc. Coordination with neighbors and members of the public. Provide presentations about project at meetings, work shops, and conferences. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $31,100
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

06: Investigate Trespass Livestock and Vehicle Trespass Level of effort will depend on the number and nature of incidents. We routinely respond to cattle trespass situations and have had at least one incident of elk poaching that was investigated and prosecuted. With increased recreational use of the Project, we anticipate greater effort will have to be employed. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $29,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
No Metrics for this Work Element

07: Maintain Vegetation Maintain planted trees, shrubs, and forbs Maintenance of previously planted trees, forbs and grasses. Maintain approximately 3 acres of aspen trees, 6 acres of ponderosa pine trees, 60 acres native bunchgrass, and 2 acres Great Basin wild rye. Restoration of degraded plant communities will increase the quality and quantity of key cover types and help maintain biodiversity. Conversion of old agricultural fields back to native plants will also reduce sediment production and protect soil resources. Level of effort will depend on weather, accessibility, and the types of noxious weeds and herbivores impacting planted sites. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $68,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
Eastside Grasslands
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands
Quaking Aspen & Curleaf Mountain Mahogany
Riparian Conditions
Sediment Conditions
No Metrics for this Work Element

08: Plant Vegetation Restoration and Rehabilitation of Plant Communities Planting of native shrubs, tree, grasses and forbs will take place throughout the project area, especially following noxious weed control efforts. Specifically, shrubs and trees will be planted in riparian areas following himalayan blackberry and poison hemlock removal. New aspen stands will be established in appropriate spring, seep and riparian habitats. Ponderosa pine trees will be planted to provide thermal cover in old wildfire areas. This action will also help restore area hydrology and increase structural complexity for targeted bird communities. Restoration of great basin wild rye communities will improve biodiversity. Much of the work will be accomplished by project sponsor but some subcontracting will be required. 3/1/2007 11/15/2009 $137,880
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
Channel Conditions
Eastside Grasslands
High & Low Water Temperatures
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands
Quaking Aspen & Curleaf Mountain Mahogany
Riparian Conditions
Sediment Conditions
* # of acres of planted: 100
* # of riparian miles treated: 3

09: Remove vegetation Noxious Weed Control Target Yellow Starthistle using chemical, mechanical, and biological control methods in the Joseph, Tamarack, and Broady Creek areas. Target Scotch Thistle using chemical and mechanical methods throughout the project area. Concentrate efforts on the Buford Unit, along roadways and trails, in riparian areas, and sites targetted for native plant restoration. Target two known populations and any new populations of Rush Skeleton Weed using chemical and mechanical methods. Attempt to eradicate discovered populations. Target Himalayan Blackberry using chemical, mechanical, and biological control methods in the Joseph, Tamarack, Rock, and Broady Creek areas. Concentrate on outlier populations and those along trails and roads. 3/1/2007 11/1/2009 $171,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
Eastside Grasslands
Habitat Diversity
Sediment Conditions
* # of acres treated: 600

10: Conduct Controlled Burn Prescribed burn in select ponderosa pine stands and associated grasslands Understory burn in pondosa pine stands in the Buford, Basin, and Rock creek drainages to improve stand condition, remove ladder fuels, and restore historical condition. Health and maintenance of pine forests was identified as a priority in the Grande Ronde Subbasin Plan. 1/1/2007 6/1/2009 $52,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
Eastside Grasslands
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands
No Metrics for this Work Element

11a: Produce Design and/or Specifications Woody Debris Recruitment to Joseph Creek Develop proposal and technical aspects of project to add large woody debris to 2 miles of Joseph Creek. Planning would include NEPA review, ESA review, hydrologic and engineering consultations, permitting, and site specific plans for adding whole trees to Joseph Creek. Such a project would address several key Biological Objectives including habitat complexity and stream channel stability. 2/1/2007 6/30/2008 $10,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Channel Conditions
Habitat Diversity
High & Low Water Temperatures
Riparian Conditions
No Metrics for this Work Element

11b: Increase Instream Habitat Complexity Woody Debris Recruitment to Joseph Creek Addition of large woody debris (LWD) in the form of whole logs (>16" dbh and >40' in length) to approximately 2 miles of Joseph Creek. Lack of LWD and insufficient pool quality and quantity have been identified as limiting factors for salmonids within Joseph Creek. This project would add woody debris directly to the stream channel using helicopters to minimize disturbance to riparian vegetation. Project success will be monitored using photo points, GPS tracking of individual trees, and evaluation of pool quality following project completion. This project will require considerable environmental review and planning to accomplish. Implementation will occur over two years during 2008 and 2009. Much of this work will be accomplished via subcontract. Additional funding for this task will be solicited from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Grande Ronde Model Watershed or other appropriate sources. 6/1/2008 9/30/2009 $172,800
Biological Objectives Metrics
Channel Conditions
Habitat Diversity
High & Low Water Temperatures
Riparian Conditions
* # of stream miles treated: 2
* # of structures installed: 100

12a: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Vegetation Monitoring Repeat sampling of established monitoring plots of at least 1,000 feet in length. Habitat Evaluation Protocol methodology will be used to measure vegetative composition and structure to evaluate effectiveness of on-going management activities. Will ensure effectiveness of management actions in maintaining and improving habitat conditions for target species. Cost estimate includes new GPS unit in FY08. 4/1/2007 8/30/2009 $44,850
Biological Objectives Metrics
Eastside Grasslands
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands
Quaking Aspen & Curleaf Mountain Mahogany
Riparian Conditions
Wetlands
Primary R, M, and E Type: Effectiveness, Status & Trend

12b: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Noxious Weed Photo Points Repeat sampling of established vegetation plot photo points. This method is being used to assess landscape level changes in vegetation over time. For example, spread and change in density of noxious weeds. Data will be used to assess effectiveness of management actions at providing quality habitat for target species. 6/1/2007 8/1/2009 $24,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Agriculture, Pasture and Mixed Environs
Eastside Grasslands
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands
Quaking Aspen & Curleaf Mountain Mahogany
Riparian Conditions
Wetlands
Primary R, M, and E Type: Effectiveness, Status & Trend

12c: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Bird Population Monitoring Point Counts of breeding birds on 8 permanent monitoring sites located throughout the Project Area. Data is used to assess effectiveness of habitat management on attracting and retaining breeding birds including the traget species Yellow Warbler, chukar, california quail, black-backed chickadee, song sparrow, and downey woodpecker. Will use the standard Partners in Flight protocol as outlined in the Management Plan. This is a seasonal effort concentrated from May through July. 5/1/2007 7/30/2009 $32,800
Biological Objectives Metrics
Eastside Grasslands
Ponderosa Pine Forest and Woodlands
Riparian Conditions
Primary R, M, and E Type: Effectiveness, Status & Trend, Compliance

13: Analyze/Interpret Data Field Data Analysis and Interpretation Statistical analysis and interpretation of field data using appropriate techniques. Baseline HEP data will be compared with data collected during subsequent monitoring at permanent HEP transects to assess the amount and direction of change in habitat quality variables such as shrub height, canopy closure, etc. This information will evaluate the effectiveness of current management strategies in providing habitat for Target Species, as outlined in the Management Plan. Detailed analysis of bird community composition, diversity, and distribution will be made to provide information about the quality of bird habitat being provided by the Project. Results will be used to modify and/or improve project management to address limiting factors for target species. This is an on-going effort. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $37,350
Biological Objectives Metrics
Primary R, M, and E Type: Effectiveness, Status & Trend

14: Create/Manage/Maintain Database Database Management for all Natural Resources Produce and maintain well-organized, current databases (including GIS layers) on ecological resources. This is an on-going activity with occasional training for staff to remain current with technology and software. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $37,950
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

15: Coordination Regional and Local Coordination May include but is not limited to watershed planning, subbasin planning, CBFWA meetings, Forest Service Planning, noxious weed coordination, meetings with neighboring landowners, etc. Attend meetings and share info / ideas with other agencies and stakeholders within the region. Foster good working relationship with neighboring landowners. This is an on-going effort which can vary in intensity over time and in response to new or emerging issues. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $63,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

16a: Manage and Administer Projects BPA Contract Administration (budgets, personnel, contracting) Develop and administer BPA Contract on annual basis. Develop Statement of Work and associated budgets. Administer BPA contract including personnel management, accrual estimation, quarterly status reports, financial reporting, and metrics reports. Includes necessary training for Pisces software applications. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $58,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

16b: Manage and Administer Projects Required Staff Training Training of project staff as required to appropriately implement the BPA contract. Training to include but is not limited to the following: Defensivce driving, ATV safety, sexual harassment and EEO, herbicide licensing and continuing education, first aide, pisces software, and professional development such as supervisory development, GIS, specialized techniques, etc. On-going effort with training occurring as funding and opportunities allow. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $22,325
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

17: Manage and Administer Projects Fire Protection Subcontract Subcontract between NPT and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) to provide initial attack fire protection on the Precious Lands Project. Subcontract amount varies yearly based on past ODF expenditures and wildland fire risk assessments. Initial attack fire control should help minimize impacts to grasslands, forests, and riparian areas from wildfires. Early detection and control of hot seasonal wildfires will also reduce sediment loads which typically peak following fire events. 11/1/2007 12/31/2009 $49,646
Biological Objectives Metrics
Eastside Grasslands
Sediment Conditions
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel [6.2 FTE] $200,000 $206,000 $212,180
Fringe Benefits [~25%] $50,000 $51,500 $53,045
Supplies [Office supplies, computer lease, field equipment, equipment repairs, fencing materials, plant materials, profesional services (plumbing, electrical), utilities, phone service, lumber, herbicide, tools, etc.] $33,350 $34,350 $35,380
Travel [GSA Vehicle Leases, Training, Travel] $37,250 $38,370 $39,520
Capital Equipment [Replacement GPS Unit] $ 0 $6,000 $ 0
Overhead [~29.64%] $95,026 $97,877 $100,813
Other Subcontracts (Fire Control, Plant Propogation, Woody Debris Placement Project) $15,800 $58,775 $58,265
Totals $431,426 $492,872 $499,203

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$1,423,501
Total Work Element budget$1,423,501

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
ODFW - Access and Habitat Grant Program Funding for winter range improvement and restoration work. $75,000 $ 0 $ 0 Cash Under Development
OWEB Funding for Joseph Creek woody debris recruitment project. $ 0 $40,000 $40,000 Cash Under Development
USFWS - Tribal Landowner Incentive Grant Funding for rare plant conservation work. $30,000 $30,000 $ 0 Cash Under Development
Totals $105,000 $70,000 $40,000

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$440,000 $445,000 On-going Operations and Maintenance needs.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
 
Termination Date Comments
None The Memorandum of Agreement between the Nez perce Tribe and Bonneville Power Administration (1996b) states on page 2 that "The underlying purpose of the agreement is to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife and wildlife habitat permanently, through the acquisition, protection and management of lands, so the parties have not included a term or termination provisions." It is the intent of the Nez Perce Tribe to manage these lands to benefit fish and wildlife populations in perpetuity.
 
Final Deliverables
Approximately 16,500 acres of fish and wildlife habitat managed to provide for the needs of target species as well as maximize benefits to local ecosystems and the biodiversity contained therein.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
Location:
Province: No Change
Subbasin: No Change
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments:


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$416,000
FY 2008 Budget
$416,000
FY 2009 Budget
$416,000
Total NPCC Rec
$1,248,000
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: Reduced budget reflects the removal of the large woody debris placement task and reducing the budget slightly below the FY2006 budget - then flatlining the 2008 and 09. Interim funding pending wildlife o&m review.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$416,000
FY 2008 Budget
$416,000
FY 2009 Budget
$416,000
Total NPCC Rec
$1,248,000
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: OSPIT recommends removing the large woody debris placement task and reducing the budget slightly below FY2006 proposed, flatlining the 2008 and 09.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This proposal is for continuing management of a large tract of land acquired for wildlife mitigation and also supplies benefits to fish. The project history is adequate, but focused on mitigation, not the goals of management, though much active management is included, and monitoring efforts are not presented clearly in the proposal itself. The ISRP in the past has expressed concern that proposals to support this project did not adequately present biological goals, objectives, and M&E. It appears that progress has been made, e.g., specific channel habitat objectives, objectives for riparian conditions (including some data), bird counts underway (though no bird count data were presented), etc.

However, the proposal repeatedly references a Management Plan that is available on the web (a long document of 129 pages that is labeled as a 2002 draft plan). The proposal itself still lacks incorporation of important details that can only be found by searching the online draft Management Plan. For instance, the list of target species in the proposal appears generic, not site specific. And, what are the goals for managing this landscape as important elk winter range? Methods for work elements are not described with enough detail. For instance, the size, number, and location of permanent plots that will be used to monitor vegetation (including weed control) should be stated, as should the key measurements that will be taken (are being taken?). Future proposals should directly summarize the technical and scientific background for managing this specific landscape and should state methods to be applied in adequate detail to facilitate scientific evaluation. Additionally, future proposals for continuation of this project must present results of M&E in order to justify the value of management expenses.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This proposal is for continuing management of a large tract of land acquired for wildlife mitigation and also supplies benefits to fish. The project history is adequate, but focused on mitigation, not the goals of management, though much active management is included, and monitoring efforts are not presented clearly in the proposal itself. The ISRP in the past has expressed concern that proposals to support this project did not adequately present biological goals, objectives, and M&E. It appears that progress has been made, e.g., specific channel habitat objectives, objectives for riparian conditions (including some data), bird counts underway (though no bird count data were presented), etc.

However, the proposal repeatedly references a Management Plan that is available on the web (a long document of 129 pages that is labeled as a 2002 draft plan). The proposal itself still lacks incorporation of important details that can only be found by searching the online draft Management Plan. For instance, the list of target species in the proposal appears generic, not site specific. And, what are the goals for managing this landscape as important elk winter range? Methods for work elements are not described with enough detail. For instance, the size, number, and location of permanent plots that will be used to monitor vegetation (including weed control) should be stated, as should the key measurements that will be taken (are being taken?). Future proposals should directly summarize the technical and scientific background for managing this specific landscape and should state methods to be applied in adequate detail to facilitate scientific evaluation. Additionally, future proposals for continuation of this project must present results of M&E in order to justify the value of management expenses.

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