FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 198331900: New Marking & Monitoring Tech

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Sandy Downing

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 198331900
Proposal Name: New Marking & Monitoring Tech
BPA Project Manager: Jan Brady
Agency, Institution or Organization: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Short Description: The goal of this project is to develop and evaluate fish-tracking technologies needed to assess the effectiveness of management actions and strategies for recovery of ESA-listed fish populations.
Information Transfer: By developing technologies that will enable fish stocks to be monitored at critical life stages and critical locations, fisheries researchers from multiple agencies will be able to carry out the actions, research, and monitoring activities listed in the numerous plans (e.g., BiOps, UPA, Fish and Wildlife Program). The progress of the development programs are discussed at regional forums such as at PIT Tag Steering Committee, FPAC, and FDDRWG meetings.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Sandy Downing NMFS - NWFSC - FE Division 2725 Montlake Blvd E
seattle, wa 98122
Ph: 206-860-5604
Fax: 206-860-3267
Email: sandy.downing@noaa.gov
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Helen Brandling-Bennett
Ph:
Fax:
Email: helen.brandling-bennett@noaa.gov
Administrative Contact
Sandy Downing NMFS - NWFSC - FE Division 2725 Montlake Blvd E
seattle, wa 98122
Ph: 206-860-5604
Fax: 206-860-3267
Email: sandy.downing@noaa.gov
Form Submitter
Project Lead

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Mainstem/Systemwide ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Systemwide ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
No Locations Entered

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
All Anadromous Salmonids

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Finished development of all components of corner-collector system (transceiver, antenna, and tag)****Fabrication of finished products so ready for install in 2006****Evaluated SGL and first-build SST tags***Assist PSMFC in development of SbyC software
2004 Continue developing corner-collector system - transceiver, antenna, and tags****Investigate why first corner-collector antenna failed****Start design of second antenna***Continue working on improving power systems for instream systems
2003 ***Evaluated new transceiver components (auto-tuning and multiplexing) and a DC-power system needed for instream systems****Started developing the corner-collector detection system ****Evaluated the ISO-based flat-plate system with fish
2002 ****Evaluated the performance of the installed interrogation systems for adult salmonids at Bonneville and McNary Dams ****Developed hybrid antenna design for small stream systems ****Installed/evaluated firfull-flow system at McNary
2001 ****Oversaw installation by COE contractors of a prototype interrogation system into Washington Shore Ladder ****Evaluated prototype interrogation system with tagged adult salmonids ****Led multi-agency team investigating impact of moisture in antennas
2000 ****Formalize the Adult PIT-Tag Oversight Committee (APTOC) ****Drafted the requirements document for transceiver systems to detect fish in orifices ****Conducted evaluations of the prototype transceiver systems with fish and in the laboratory
1999 ****Designed three styles of antenna housings for orifices ****Started field evaluation of the ISO-based transceiver systems in fish ladders ****Developed evaluation techniques and procedures for determining tag-reading efficiencies in fish ladders
1998 ****Developed prototype 3-way side-to-side fish diversion gate ****Directed fish tests for ISO-based PIT-tag systems for juvenile salmon ****Installed and evaluated PIT-tag system for adult salmon in the Adult Fish Facility at Bonneville Dam
1997 **** Led the evaluation of the ISO-based prototype transceiver systems ****Installed the first version of the computer program MULTIMON at CRB Dams ****Installed and evaluated a PIT-tag system for juvenile salmon at Bonneville Dam
1996 **** Completed study to determine effects of electromagnetic fields on fish reproduction and behavior **** Installed and evaluated the first flat-plate interrogaton system at Bonneville Dam ****Developed first underwater towed PIT-tag system
1995 ***** Conducted study to compare hatchery return rate of PIT-tagged and CW-tagged coho salmon ***** Installed and evaluated the first Separation-by-Code system at Lower Granite Dam
1994 Completed predator avoidance testing of PIT tagged vs other tag types ***** Started second study determining effects of PIT tags on growth, behavior, and survival of juvenile salmonids
1993 ****Compared overwinter survival of PIT-tagged and CW-tagged hatchery coho in a stream ****Started development of extended-range PIT-tag system for adult salmonids****Transfer technology for installing systems at dams to PSMFC
1992 ***** Completed initial evaluation of technical feasability of developing a passive acoustic miniature PIT tag ***** Started the development of separation-by-code software
1991 ***Started studies on effects of electromagnetic fields on fish reproduction and behavior***Started studies on predators and marked fish****Completed study on long-term effects of tagging on coho salmon***Handed over management of PTAGIS database to PSMFC
1990 ****Continued studies to determine effects of PIT tags on growth, behavior, and survival of juvenile salmonids ****Installed PIT-tag detection system into Little Goose Dam ****Started design process for PIT-tag systems at Lower Monumental and Bonnevill
1989 ****Started studies to determine effects of PIT tags on growth, behavior, and survival of juvenile salmonids****Started study on long-term effects of tagging by releasing marked coho from Skagit Hatchery****Evaluated installed systems at dams with fish
1988 ***** Completed initial determination of the effects of PIT-tagging on juvenile salmonids ***** Completed development of the first fish diversion gates (slide gates)
1987 ***** Completed first phase development of an automated data entry station for tagging fish ***** Installed and evaluated first prototype PIT-tag interrogation systems for juvenile salmon at McNary Dam and adults at Lower Granite Dam
1986 ***** Finished development of first-generation tagging and detection equipment ***** Made plans for installing PIT-tag interrogation systems for juvenile salmon throughout the CRB
1985 Developed tagging techniques for PIT tags
1984 Continued the development work.
1983 Started the process of developing PIT-tag components (e.g., tags, detection equipment) that would work for monitoring salmonids

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA [no entry] [Related Project Title left blank] All of the RM&E studies rely on technologies developed through this project. Currently, this is mostly PIT-tag technologies.
BPA 199008000 Columbia Basin Pit-Tag Informa This project provides the web-based data needed by this project to conduct its analyses. We also provide feedback for improving the website as new technology often means new tools need to be designed.
BPA 199008001 Pit Tag Purchases We rely on this project for the PIT tags we use in our evaluations
BPA 199102800 Pit Tagging Wild Chinook This project now uses in-stream PIT-tag detection systems for monitoring survival and behavior of wild fish as they emigrate from certain natal rearing areas.
BPA 200100300 Adult Pit Detector Installatio This project depends on the technology developed by this project for its production installations
BPA 200102500 Rattlesnake Cr Salmonid Prod We develop and maintain PIT-tag technology that is used to assess the current and potential salmonid production in Rattlesnake Creek associated with restoration efforts

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks Develop and evaluate fish-tracking technologies needed to assess the effectiveness of management actions and strategies for recovery of ESA-listed fish populations. None hydrosystem strategy is to make operational and structural fish passage improvements at FCRPS projects that will increase the survival of listed fish. [Pg no blank]

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
1: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Determine tag-reading efficiencies for different salmonid populations by the corner-collector PIT-tag system at Bonneville Dam Having a corner-collector PIT-tag system that detects 60% of the tagged smolts using the exit flume is critical for making estimates of reach survivals and for helping to assess progress toward hydrosystem performance standards. We need to evaluate whether the installed system can detect 60% of fish released one at a time for the main salmonid populations: spring Chinook salmon, steelhead, and fall Chinook salmon. If the system is performing well, then we need to evaluate how it performs with salmon released at different fish densities. 1/1/2007 9/30/2007 $175,698
Biological Objectives Metrics
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks
No Metrics for this Work Element

2: Develop RM&E Methods and Designs Support for designing a detection system for the ice and trash sluiceway at The Dalles Dam Based on the success of developing a detection system for the corner-collector, the fish managers would like to install a system into the ice and trash sluiceway at The Dalles Dam. This site potentially could require an antenna even larger than the corner collector and it appears to have more turbulent water conditions. Since we need to find out how well the corner collector system operates and how well the new PIT tag model performs, we propose moving slowly on this work element. For that reason, in FY07 we propose conducting two site visits to define possible antenna locations and limitations. If a solution can be found, then we would work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and PSMFC on designing a system in FY08 with an installation then scheduled for FY09. This project would be responsible for developing and manufacturing the antenna systems. Since this site could potentially require a huge antenna, we have put a placeholder of $250,000 for fabricating that antenna in FY08 and a placeholder of $30,000 for system development. NMFS would then conduct a fish test to evaluate the performance of the detection system in FY09. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $508,073
Biological Objectives Metrics
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks
No Metrics for this Work Element

3: Develop RM&E Methods and Designs Develop an interrogation system for detecting fish using surface-bypass systems Currently, the fish managers are using spillways and other surface-bypass systems (e.g., RSWs and the corner collector) as primary conduits for passing juvenile salmonid through federal hydroelectric facilities in the CRB during their outmigration. This means that fewer PIT-tagged juvenile salmonids are being detected in the installed PIT-tag interrogation systems. To rectify for this loss of data used to make management decisions, we need to develop fish-tracking systems that will interrogate the fish in spillways and other pathways that currently lack detection systems. Because the detection range of PIT tags is limited due to their passive mode of operation, to accomplish detection in these large surface-bypass systems will require a new type of interrogation system. Over the past 2 years, NMFS has directly contracted Digital Angel to investigate the technical feasibility of developing an active PIT (APIT) tag. Although Digital Angel’s preliminary investigation suggested that an APIT tag system would be technically possible, the report raised questions about the system’s practicality because it would require very large antennas that would be quite costly to fabricate, install, and maintain. We therefore think it is prudent to investigate alternative technologies. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $2,331,144
Biological Objectives Metrics
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks
No Metrics for this Work Element

4: Develop RM&E Methods and Designs Develop and evaluate the G2-stream transceiver When the corner-collector project started, we realized we needed to develop the next generation of ISO-based transceivers (nicknamed the G2 transceivers). Digital Angel has finished the development of the key components for the G2 transceivers. During the development, they realized that they would need to make different versions of the G2 transceiver for different applications (i.e., one transceiver could not do it all). Because the corner-collector detection system had the highest priority, they finished the G2 transceiver for that application first. However, this G2-CC transceiver will not work for in-stream systems because it cannot multiplex multiple antennas. The ability to multiplex antennas from a single transceiver is critical for in-stream projects because they are often in remote locations where grid power is unavailable. This development is important as more and more in-stream systems are being installed. May projects are currently using them to determine if habitat and stock restoration efforts are successful when structures in streams are removed or improved. One of the goals of the UPA is to interrogate adults in their natal streams, but many of the ESA-listed stocks spawn in large streams, which are too large to interrogate with the current set of PIT-tag technologies. The G2-stream transceiver would enable us to develop larger antennas. 10/1/2006 9/30/2008 $216,294
Biological Objectives Metrics
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks
No Metrics for this Work Element

5: Develop RM&E Methods and Designs Continue development of in-stream interrogation systems The development of a G2 transceiver that will work for in-stream systems is critical for providing researchers and agencies with the technology to monitor fish in large streams or even rivers. This need has been confirmed by representatives from USGS, USFWS, ODFW, IDFG, and WDFG. Once a G2-stream transceiver is developed, we plan to investigate designing larger antennas. As larger antennas are developed it will become increasingly difficult to find naturally flat areas for installation and therefore, we will explore several approaches to designing flexible antennas. We will also investigate whether we can design in-stream systems that have much longer antenna cables by including some of the active electronic parts in the antennas. Developing a cost-effective power system for in-stream PIT-tag systems in remote locations has been a challenging task. We propose to continue our efforts to develop an oxygen cell that will produce power using water flowing through it. We plan to fabricate a large system in FY07 and conduct field testing to determine how well the system stands up to a variety of environmental (e.g., temperature) and power load conditions. 10/1/2006 12/30/2009 $330,397
Biological Objectives Metrics
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks
No Metrics for this Work Element

6: Manage and Administer Projects Project Management Proper project administration is necessary to ensure that this project stays on track with its work schedules. Project administration involves planning and then monitoring the work and budget to make certain that the milestones are reached and the project stays within budget. It involves attending planning and budgetary meetings on the project. It also involves writing and monitoring subcontracts, providing technical assistance to users of PIT-tag technology, and writing project plans, progress reports, and annual reports. In FY09, Work Element 6 will include writing the next 3-year proposal for the Fish and Wildlife Program solicitation. 10/1/2006 9/30/2010 $91,056
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

7: Produce Pisces Status Report Pisces Status Reports BPA contract requires this project provide quarterly status reports to its COTR 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $5,882
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

8: Produce Annual Report Annual Report BPA contract requires this project provide an annual report describing the activities accomplished. This annual report provides a detailed summary of the steps taken during the different development projects, which is an important reference for when this technology is transferred to the operations level. 9/1/2007 9/30/2009 $64,175
Biological Objectives Metrics
Help the recovery of ESA-listed stocks
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel [blank] $243,673 $211,723 $225,136
Fringe Benefits [blank] $64,573 $56,107 $59,661
Supplies [blank] $44,415 $14,154 $46,970
Travel [blank] $26,398 $18,903 $21,760
Capital Equipment [blank] $ 0 $250,000 $ 0
Overhead [blank] $162,042 $140,796 $149,716
Other this includes larage contracts for the surface-bypass system development, the antenna for the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam, and for the develoment of the G2-stream transceiver $227,584 $665,560 $1,093,548
Totals $768,685 $1,357,243 $1,596,791

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$3,722,719
Total Work Element budget$3,722,719

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$750,000 $750,000 Since this is a research and development project, it is really impossible to predict at this point what will be happening in 2010 and beyond.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
 
Termination Date Comments
unknown At this time, it seems that there are many different technologies that have potential to be adapted to fisheries research. As technology advances, the fisheries community benefits by getting better tools for collecting data on ESA-listed and non-listed salmonid populations. Therefore, it is not easy to predict when this project should be terminated.
 
Final Deliverables

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
Location:
Province: No Change
Subbasin: No Change
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments: [none]


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$909,930
FY 2008 Budget
$1,149,930
FY 2009 Budget
$909,930
Total NPCC Rec
$2,969,790
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:Basinwide
Recommendation:Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$909,930
FY 2008 Budget
$1,149,930
FY 2009 Budget
$909,930
Total NPCC Rec
$2,969,790
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$909,930
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$1,149,930
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$909,930
Total MSRT Rec
$2,969,790
Budget Category:Basinwide
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: The MSRT recommends funding this project at it's 2006 funding level (plus 5% for increased costs) average for the three years of funding, due to limited funding in the Basinwide category. The research scheduled in the proposal should be sequenced at a slower pace to adjust to the funding level proposed here. The MSRT supports a comprehensive review of tagging in the CRB. The results of that review will likely guide the continuation of this project. A one time cost of $240,000 is included for FY2008 for The Dalles sluiceway receiver.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This is a strong proposal with high priority application of the technology in the basin, good personnel, and an excellent track record. The project sponsors have been responsive to past ISRP reviews.

The proponents plan to explore the application of PIT tag technologies to surface bypass systems (RSWs, Bonneville corner collector, even spillways and turbines). The evaluation of the G2 transceiver for instream interrogations will require development of new antenna arrays and even new tags (A-PIT). These efforts are tied in generally to the BiOps, UPA, and systemwide passage program summary, although particular elements are not listed. Effective PIT tag systems underlie much of the salmon recovery efforts in the Columbia River Basin, and the extensive history presented in this proposal leaves no doubt of the importance of the work to answering questions about the survival of anadromous salmonids in the Columbia River Basin.

The proposal does a good job relating the technologies developed in the past to ongoing and future projects. Less information is provided about the need for the advanced technologies they propose to develop, and specifically which projects might employ these developments. That is, they are necessarily a bit ahead of many of the projects that will use new PIT tags and transceivers. The investigators should be aware of work being done by the mid-Columbia Public Utility Districts (PUDs).

The value of this long-term effort is well established. Continued improvement in tags and antennas is expected to further improve the knowledge of salmonids in the basin and the ability to carry out adaptive management. Some of this work is necessary because increased downstream passage through surface bypasses, RSWs, and spill has reduced the numbers of fish that are detected through the conventional PIT-tag interrogation systems. So development of detectors for these alternative routes is needed in order to collect the juvenile fish passage data for management actions.

The proposal provides a well-detailed listing of work elements, with a systematic, step-by-step approach that allows for periodic feedback from outside experts and changes in direction as necessitated by the results from each step.

Past work has produced a handful of publications, some of them describing older, outmoded technologies. Equipment development and testing is the primary focus of this proposal (with the product being efficient tags and antennas). However, it would be good to see more of this information get out into the primary fisheries (and electronic) literature in order to inform scientists and engineers outside of the basin about the possibilities.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This is a strong proposal with high priority application of the technology in the basin, good personnel, and an excellent track record. The project sponsors have been responsive to past ISRP reviews.

The proponents plan to explore the application of PIT tag technologies to surface bypass systems (RSWs, Bonneville corner collector, even spillways and turbines). The evaluation of the G2 transceiver for instream interrogations will require development of new antenna arrays and even new tags (A-PIT). These efforts are tied in generally to the BiOps, UPA, and systemwide passage program summary, although particular elements are not listed. Effective PIT tag systems underlie much of the salmon recovery efforts in the Columbia River Basin, and the extensive history presented in this proposal leaves no doubt of the importance of the work to answering questions about the survival of anadromous salmonids in the Columbia River Basin.

The proposal does a good job relating the technologies developed in the past to ongoing and future projects. Less information is provided about the need for the advanced technologies they propose to develop, and specifically which projects might employ these developments. That is, they are necessarily a bit ahead of many of the projects that will use new PIT tags and transceivers. The investigators should be aware of work being done by the mid-Columbia Public Utility Districts (PUDs).

The value of this long-term effort is well established. Continued improvement in tags and antennas is expected to further improve the knowledge of salmonids in the basin and the ability to carry out adaptive management. Some of this work is necessary because increased downstream passage through surface bypasses, RSWs, and spill has reduced the numbers of fish that are detected through the conventional PIT-tag interrogation systems. So development of detectors for these alternative routes is needed in order to collect the juvenile fish passage data for management actions.

The proposal provides a well-detailed listing of work elements, with a systematic, step-by-step approach that allows for periodic feedback from outside experts and changes in direction as necessitated by the results from each step.

Past work has produced a handful of publications, some of them describing older, outmoded technologies. Equipment development and testing is the primary focus of this proposal (with the product being efficient tags and antennas). However, it would be good to see more of this information get out into the primary fisheries (and electronic) literature in order to inform scientists and engineers outside of the basin about the possibilities.

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