FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199801700: North Fork/Mid-John Day Fish Passage Improvement

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Alex Conley

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199801700
Proposal Name: North Fork/Mid-John Day Fish Passage Improvement
BPA Project Manager: Jamie Swan
Agency, Institution or Organization: Monument & Wheeler SWCDs
Short Description: We will replace problematic irrigation diversions and culverts in the Lower North Fork and Mid-mainstem John Day Watersheds with fish-friendly structures that ensure fish passage and improve riparian habitat while efficiently meeting landmanagers' needs.
Information Transfer: This project focuses on completing on-the-ground habitat improvement work with direct and immediate benefits to anadramous and resident fish. Results of successful restoration projects will be highlighted in newsletters, reports, and other publications of the Monument and Wheeler SWCDs and the Mid-John Day, Bridge Creek and North Fork John Day Watershed Councils. Success stories will be highlighted in local and regional media. The primary use of monitoring data will be to guide implementation of this project, but if monitoring shows broadly-applicable results, it may be summarized in project-generated reports made available to interested parties.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Alex Conley North Fork John Day Watershed Council P.O. Box 95
Monument OR 97864
Ph: 541.934.2141
Fax: 541.934.2132
Email: nfjdwc@centurytel.net
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Alex Conley North Fork John Day Watershed Council P.O. Box 95
Monument OR 97864
Ph: 541.934.2141
Fax: 541.934.2132
Email: nfjdwc@centurytel.net
Form Submitter

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: John Day ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
44.5654856 N 120.1446231 W Bridge Creek Mitchell High School Diversion Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.5138486 N 120.1497489 W Bridge Creek Hashknife Upper Diversion Pipeline Phase #1 Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.5138486 N 120.1497489 W Bridge Creek Hashknife Upper Diversion Pipeline Phase #2 Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.6066732 N 120.2174494 W Bridge Creek Woodward Bridge Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.5178015 N 120.1480143 W Bridge Creek Old MItchell Diversion Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
45.0575811 N 120.3681897 W Butte Creek Stanley Culvert Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.9550393 N 120.1353561 W Butte Creek Forestry Diversion Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.9802094 N 120.1325141 W Butte Creek Wild Turkey Diversion/Culvert Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.9394750 N 120.1237190 W Butte Creek Bear Hollow Culvert Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
45.0003901 N 120.2229964 W Butte Creek Fossil Culvert Step-pools Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.9802094 N 120.15000084 W Butte Creek Kinzua Culvert Wheeler, Oregon John Day No
44.7881 N 119.4034 W Cottonwood Upper Ditch Diversion & Pipeline Grant, Oregon John Day No
44.8054 N 119.4150 W Cottonwood Creek 2 Standard Layflat Diversions Grant, Oregon John Day No
44.7919 N 119.4037 W Cottonwood Creek Lower Cottonwood Ditch Diversion Grant, Oregon John Day Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Steelhead Middle Columbia River ESU
Chinook Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Interior Redband Trout
Pacific Lamprey

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 8 fish-friendly diversions installed (3 on North Fork, 5 on Cottonwood Creek) and designs completed for 8 more to be completed in 2006. Improvements completed on 2 earlier installations. Extensive work completed in Wheeler County using non-BPA funds
2004 Five fish-friendly diversions installed, eliminating the need for four push-up dams. Additional design options explored.
2003 Designs developed and lead staff turnover; no field work beyond monitoring and maintenance.
2002 Further installations delayed as design issues in FY 2001 installations were addressed.
2001 Two more fish-friendly diversions installed on Lower North Fork John Day based on a revised design approved by NOAA.
2000 Installation of more fish-friendly diversions delayed due to Mid-Columbia steelhead listing and associated need for consultation with NOAA.
1999 First two fish-friendly irrigation diversions installed on Lower North Fork John Day.
1998 Project initiated.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
Other: NOAA/American Rivers [no entry] City of Fossil Culvert Replacement #2 Another in-city culvert that was a part of the Butte Creek fish passage prioritization process. This project is scheduled for implementation during the 2006 in-stream work window.
OWEB - State [no entry] Current Proposals Several proposals currently under consideration to thin juniper and improve grazing management in this project's priority areas.
BPA 198402100 John Day Habitat Enhancement ODFW project which has installed numerous riparian buffers in the priority areas for this project.
BPA 199306600 Oregon Fish Screens Project Installs fish screens on irrigation diversions in the project area; work will be coordinated with diversion replacements done under our project.
BPA 199801700 Gravel Push-Up Dam Removal Low Predecessor to this project which has already installed 17 fish-friendly irrigation diversions on the North Fork and Cottonwood Creek, and which is scheduled to replace 8 more in 2006 (See section 4).
BPA 199801800 John Day Watershed Restoration Working in partnership with the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs four fish passage barrier culverts on lower Butte Creek were funded as a part of this proposal for the 2006/2007 contract. This fits right in with the Butte Creek fish passage project priortization.
BPA 200003100 Enhance North Fork John Day Ri CTUIR project that has established riparian buffers that incorporate fish friendly diversions established by this project.
BPA 200203400 Wheeler Co Riparian Buffers Project that works to establish CREP buffers in priority watersheds in Wheeler County that may complement habitat improvements under this project.
OWEB - State 204-052 North Fork John Day WSC Suppor Provides basic operaing support to project sponsor, reducing the amount of overhead that must be charged to this BPA project.
OWEB - State 204-259 Lillicrop Upland Stockwater This project provided exclusion fencing along Nelson Creek, an important tributary of Bridge Creek and also installed off-channel water developments and cross fencing to improve upland grazing management eliminating sediment and nutrients entering the stream system.
PCSRF - OWEB 204-308 Butte Cr Watershed Assessment Due to be completed in June 2006, information from this assessment, even while in-process, added to the Butte Creek project prioritization process.
OWEB - State 204-412 Deer Cr Upland Waters Project Grazing management project aimed at improving riparian conditions in one of our priority watersheds.
OWEB - State 205-081 Hashknife Irrigation Replacement of middle diversion structure and converting open pipe to ditch on the Hashknife Ranch opening up fish passage further up Bridge Creek and improving irrigation efficiency to allow more water in stream. this was the middle diverson on same reach as one of this proposal's projects.
OWEB - State 205-088 Butte Cr Riparian Restoration Replaced failing diversion, exclusion fence and converted open irrigation ditch to pipe. This project is located mid-way on Butte Creek opening up passage for all life stages of salmonids. Adds to this proposal's project goals of opening up fish passage.
OWEB - State 205-091 Nelson Cr Diversion Replacemen Another riparian improvement on important tributary to Bridge Creek. Reducing sediment and improving irrigation efficiency.
OWEB - State 205-092 L Bridge Cr Diversion Improvem Replaces a push-up dam diversion with a fish friendly diversion structure and adds a fish screen into system. This is located on lower Bridge Creek which will open up stream to all life stages of salmonids.
OWEB - State 205-205 Sweet Diversion Replacement Push-up dam replacement to a fish-friendly structure and converted failing open ditch to pipe. This is located at the beginning of the headwaters of Bridge Creek and fits in with our prioritization of fish passage fixes on this stream.
OWEB - State 205-206 Hashknife Bridge A failing, undersized and perched culvert was replaced with a bridge. This was another prioritized project for fish passage on Bridge Creek headwaters allowing connectivity and all life stages of salmonids to access quality habitat.
OWEB - State 206-144 City of Fossil Culvert Replace This is the first of several in-city culverts (one included in this proposal) opening up passage and connecting Butte Creek habitat for all life stages of salmonids. A part of the Butte Creek prioritization plan.
OWEB - State 206-151 Butte Cr WS Juniper Abatement Although not dealing with fish passage, this juniper removal project will treat 1,156 acres directly adjacent to Butte Creek, improving flow and hydrology.
OWEB - State 25-04-010 Hunt Juniper Thinning Project Juniper thinning project in Cottonwood Watershed that may contribute to improved baseflows.
OWEB - State 25-04-011 Davidson Juniper Thinning Proj Juniper thinning project in Cottonwood Watershed that may contribute to improved baseflows.
OWEB - State 25-04-012 DeRoos Ditch Conversion Irrigation efficiency project on Holmes Creek, one of our secondary priorities.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
A. Minimize artificial passage barriers Irrigation diversions and poorly designed road crossings can block upstream migration of adult spawners and instream movements of juveniles in search of refugia in which to pass critical periods of low flow and high temperature. This project aims to remove such artifical barriers and replace them with fish-friendly structures that meet landowner/operator needs while ensuring unimpeded fish passage. Measurable indicators of progress include the number of barriers eliminated and the percent of known barriers within each stream system that have been eliminated. John Day Strategy A: Improve Fish Passage 252-254
B. Moderate extreme stream temperatures Maintenance of push-up dams and other temporary diversion structures and undersized culverts often require regular instream use of heavy equipment, which can break down streambanks, compact substrates, and retard establishment of riparian vegetation. Hydrologic changes associated with these structures can degrade stream channel form. Replacement structures will be designed to eliminate undesired disturbance to surrounding riparian areas, allowing for channel narrowing and increased shade, which in turn will reduce water temperatures. Numeric indicators of progress towards this objective include the number of sites where the need for regular disturbance is eliminated, and the linear feet of stream and bank now protected from such disturbance. John Day Strategy D: In-Stream Activities Strategy E: Riparian Habitat Improvements 260-266
C. Minimize unnatural rates of erosion When push-up dams wash out each year with the return of high flows, and when undersized culverts cause scouring or plug, overflow and/or blow out, excessive amounts of sediment are eroded from the structure site and released into the stream. Replacement structures will minimize such erosion. The main numeric indicator of progress is the number of sites stabalized. John Day Strategy D: In-Stream Activities Strategy E: Riparian Habitat Improvements 260-266
D. Improve base flows Higher summer base flows significantly improve conditions for rearing salmonids. We will implement selected irrigation efficiency projects to reduce the amount of water diverted for irrigation. The main indicator will be the estimated reduction in water diverted. John Day Strategy C2: Irrigation Efficiency Projects 257-259
E. Prevent entrainment in irrigation systems Entrappment in irrigation water delivery systems can be a major source of mortality and stress to fish. We will ensure that all irrigation diversions installed or replaced as part of this project incorporate up-to-date fish screens that meet all state and federal specifications. Numeric indicators of progress towards this objective include the number of new screens installed and the percent of diversions in each stream system that have up-to-date screens installed. John Day Stategy B: Install Fish Screens on Water Diversions 255-256

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Obtain Required Permits and Clearances Work with BPA to assure NEPA and ESA clearances; obtain DSL and Corps permits for instream work, and make any required changes to water right certificates. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Install Fish Passage Structure Culvert replacement/correction Replace problem culverts or create passage through existing culverts in good condition. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $273,385
Biological Objectives Metrics
A. Minimize artificial passage barriers
B. Moderate extreme stream temperatures
C. Minimize unnatural rates of erosion
* Does the structure remove or replace a fish passage barrier?: yes
* Was barrier Full or Partial?: partial
* If installing a ladder, does the ladder meet NOAA specs for attraction flow, pool dimensions, jump height, etc?: yes
* # of miles of habitat accessed: Restore connectivity on 40+ stream miles

Install Fish Screen Install Fish Screens on Irrigation Pumps Install NOAA approved fish screen 1/1/2009 12/30/2009 $1,500
Biological Objectives Metrics
E. Prevent entrainment in irrigation systems
* Quantity of water protected by screening, as determined by what is stated in the water right or calculated based on flow rate: .25 cfs
* Does the screen meet NOAA/FSOC specs?: yes
* Is the screen New or a Replacement?: new

Remove/Install Diversion Remove/Install Diversion Remove problematic irrigation diversions and replace with fish friendly structures 1/1/2007 12/30/2009 $265,945
Biological Objectives Metrics
A. Minimize artificial passage barriers
B. Moderate extreme stream temperatures
C. Minimize unnatural rates of erosion
* # of miles of habitat accessed: Connectivity restored on 40+ stream miles

Coordination Coordinate Design, Installation, Maintenance and Evaluation of Fish-Friendly Structures This Work Element covers staff time spent working with landowners, contractors and others to plan out potential projects. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Identify and Select Projects Locate and Assess Potential Project Sites Each year we will assess and prioritize possible future project sites. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Manage and Administer Projects Manage and administer individual projects Manage logistics of individual fish-friendly structure installations 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $196,884
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Manage and Administer Projects Manage and administer overall BPA contract General management and administration of BPA contract 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $31,500
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Design and/or Specifications Produce designs and specifications for fish-friendly structures Includes engineering surveys, designs, specifications and installation oversight. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $133,350
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Plan Monitoring and Evaluation Plan for Fish-Friendly Structure Each year a short monitoring plan will be developed that assesses the results of previous years' monitoirng and identifies monitoring activities to be conducted in the upcoming year. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Annual Report Produce Annual Reports [Work Element Description Not Entered] 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $4,500
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Status Report Produce Quarterly Reports [Work Element Description Not Entered] 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Analyze/Interpret Data Cataloging and Interpretation of Photo and Temperature Data Process, catalogue and analyze results of photo monitoring and temperature monitoring. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Secondary R, M, and E Type: Processing and assessment of photomonitoring data
Secondary R, M, and E Type: Processing and assessment of temperature data

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Photo Point and Temperature Monitoring Set up and rephotograph photo-monitoring sites; conduct instantaneous temperature monitoring and deploy, audit and retrieve temperature loggers. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $4,500
Biological Objectives Metrics
Secondary R, M, and E Type: Photomonitoring of Project Implementation

Install Pipeline Convert open ditch to pipeline Convert open ditch to pipeline to increase water savings and keep more water instream during irrigation seasons 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $345,200
Biological Objectives Metrics
D. Improve base flows
* Estimated # of miles of primary stream reach improvement: 8 miles
* Amount of unprotected water flow returned to the stream by conservation in cfs: 2-6 cfs depending on season


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Overhead Fiscal admin & general overhead $57,345 $55,975 $39,114
Personnel Technician (0.5 FTE) $30,150 $31,950 $28,125
Personnel Project managers (0.6 FTE) $25,200 $27,300 $22,400
Other Contract Engineering $42,375 $43,125 $38,625
Other Contracted Construction Labor & Equipment $105,800 $107,600 $92,375
Supplies Construction materials (steel, pipe, rock, etc) $255,925 $232,770 $92,610
Totals $516,795 $498,720 $313,249

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$1,328,764
Total Work Element budget$1,328,764

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
City of Fossil Equipment and Man Power $ 0 $5,000 $5,000 In-Kind Under Development
Landowner Equipment and Man Power $20,000 $20,000 $10,000 In-Kind Under Development
NRCS Cash $70,000 $70,000 $40,000 Cash Under Development
OWEB Cash $80,000 $150,000 $100,000 Cash Under Development
USFWS Consultation $2,500 $2,500 $2,500 In-Kind Under Development
Wheeler County Rd Dept. Equipment and Man Power $25,000 $25,000 $25,000 In-Kind Under Development
Totals $197,500 $272,500 $182,500

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$350,000 $350,000 Ample work is available to continue the project at a steady rate into out years.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
Long-term operations and maintenance costs are the responsibility of the owners/operators of the improved diversion and road crossing structures. During the life of the project we will strive to work with owner/operators to ensure that structures installed as part of this project perform as intended, but no specific commitments will be made that extend beyond the project period.
 
Termination Date Comments
None This project is ongoing; as passage barriers in our intial priority areas are addressed, we will move on to our next tier of projects. It is anticipated that approximately a decade of work at this rate would be required to address all significant artificial passage barriers in our work areas.
 
Final Deliverables
As individual fish-friendly structures are installed, we will provide detailed reports on their installation and subsequent operation.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Both Capital and Expense
Location:
Province: No Change
Subbasin: No Change
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments:


BPA Capital/Expense Review Results (March 14, 2006) [Download full document]

Initial BPA Capital/Expense Determination (Subject to final review):
Expense - Not functionally interdependent
Primary Uncertainty for Capitalization: ---


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$423,666
FY 2008 Budget
$405,591
FY 2009 Budget
$320,120
Total NPCC Rec
$1,149,377
Budget Type:Capital
Budget Category:ProvinceCapital
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: Capital component.


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$93,129
FY 2008 Budget
$93,129
FY 2009 Budget
$93,129
Total NPCC Rec
$279,387
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: This work will be funded as part of project 199801800. Expense portion of project. See capital budget for capital component.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$93,129
FY 2008 Budget
$93,129
FY 2009 Budget
$93,129
Total NPCC Rec
$279,387
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:
NPCC Staff Comments: Expense portion of project. This work will be funded as part of project 199801800.

Local or MSRT Comments: OSPIT recommends slowing the pace of implementation to seven projects per year, flatlining the outyears. The project will continue to focus on the most important tributaries that were identified in the John Day subbasin plan.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$423,666
FY 2008 Budget
$405,591
FY 2009 Budget
$320,120
Total NPCC Rec
$1,149,377
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceCapital
Comments: Capital portion of project

Local or MSRT Comments: OSPIT recommends slowing the pace of implementation to seven projects per year, flatlining the outyears. The project will continue to focus on the most important tributaries that were identified in the John Day subbasin plan.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This well-written project proposal describes activities to improve habitat connectivity and riparian habitat conditions in selected tributaries to the North Fork and Mid-mainstem of the John Day River by replacing between 18 and 25 problematic irrigation diversions, culverts, and other artificial structures with fish-friendly structures. The culverts were identified through a prioritization process. The focal species include Mid-Columbia Summer Steelhead, redband trout, specific life histories of Mid-Columbia Spring Chinook, and Pacific Lamprey.

This is a solid proposal that demonstrates its activities are linked to priority needs from regional and subbasin planning documents and that is making steady progress toward achieving its objectives. Much of the proposal and planned work is straightforward with simple monitoring planned to document that anticipated results are actually achieved.

No termination date is identified for the project even though sponsor comments indicate that approximately 10-13 years work will be needed to address passage issues in the John Day Basin. Even though such a termination date is uncertain and is some years out, a termination date should be identified for projects, rather than leaving them open-ended.

The ISRP has a programmatic concern on all projects proposing culvert replacement.

1. Prioritization of specific culvert?

2. How much habitat is made available?

3. What is the "quality" of the habitat?

This project has addressed these concerns within its proposal.

Technical and scientific justification: Fixing fish passage barriers is the focus of this project. Primary barriers are culverts and push-up dams. Excellent descriptions of problems with push-up dams and culverts at the specific watershed sites to be addressed by this project are included in the proposal. These are effectively illustrated with maps, graphs, and photographs of problem areas and fish-friendly alternatives.

Push-up dams and old makeshift diversion dams are to be replaced with removable flashboard dams and/or rock step-pool weirs, while poorly-installed culverts and other problematic road crossings (collapsed log bridges, etc) will be replaced with properly-sized culverts, bottomless arch culverts or small bridges. Funding is requested for $1,328,764 over the 3-year project period.

Priority areas are consistent with those identified in the John Day Subbasin Plan. Fish passage has been identified in the subbasin plan as a high-priority limiting factor.

Relationship of activities under this project to the Fish and Wildlife Program and to the subbasin plan is clear. The actions in this project are directly tied to specific priority restoration strategies in the subbasin plan. The proposal also discusses relationship to the draft recovery plan (not yet released) for Mid-Columbia steelhead. Project actions relate to RPA 149 in the 2000 BiOp.

Relationships to other projects: Examples are given of other projects this group works with: ODFW fish screens, multi-agency riparian habitat restoration, Oregon Water Trust irrigation efficiency projects, other SWCD upland conservation. The project will build on previous passage work of these SWCDs and others.

Project history: To date, this project has replaced 15 problematic irrigation diversions with fish friendly alternatives, with another 8 scheduled for replacement in 2006 (Map G). This represents over 60% of the problematic diversions in the initial project area. As initially developed, the project focused on eliminating push-up dams on the lower mainstem of the North Fork John Day. In 2003, sponsors started to emphasize works in tributaries, as low-flow passage barriers typically have much more impact in small streams that do provide summer habitat to salmonids.

Objectives: Five project objectives are clearly specified with quantitative measures of progress. Brief but clear descriptions of the intent of each objective are included. Timelines are not included.

Tasks (work elements) and methods: Work elements are specifically described. Methods have previously demonstrated effectiveness. Note is made of the need for voluntary cooperation of landowners, and that this may limit project success. However, a history of positive working relationships of the SWCD and landowners make failure unlikely.

Monitoring and evaluation: The project includes basic monitoring of effectiveness of actions -- habitat response to project implementation. Population response monitoring is done by other projects (ODFW, NOAA/BOR). Work elements are included for project effectiveness monitoring to collect data on: site changes (photopoints) and stream temperature. Monitoring, data collection, and analysis are done in collaboration with Monument SWCD. Primary use of project-generated monitoring is to assess effectiveness and guide project implementation.

The project also includes a monitoring component, which aims to 1) document the changes at project sites over time through photo monitoring, and 2) determine whether in fact push-up dams result in warming of downstream flows. Photo documentation has show gradual riparian recovery at the sites of old push-up dams. The temperature monitoring that has been collected has documented that specific types of push-up dams (in particular, ones that create long artificial side-channels in summer low flow conditions) can elevate water temperatures. Other types of push up dams do not have as clear a temperature signal.

Facilities, equipment, and personnel: Facilities are reasonable. A history of collaboration among SWCDs and among SWCDs and landowners make these groups uniquely qualified to implement these types of projects on private lands.

Information transfer: Project results to be reported in SWCD newsletters, reports and other publications of the SWCDs and watershed councils, local and regional media. If monitoring shows broadly applicable results, sponsors intend to summarize in more broadly distributed reports.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This well-written project proposal describes activities to improve habitat connectivity and riparian habitat conditions in selected tributaries to the North Fork and Mid-mainstem of the John Day River by replacing between 18 and 25 problematic irrigation diversions, culverts, and other artificial structures with fish-friendly structures. The culverts were identified through a prioritization process. The focal species include Mid-Columbia Summer Steelhead, redband trout, specific life histories of Mid-Columbia Spring Chinook, and Pacific Lamprey.

This is a solid proposal that demonstrates its activities are linked to priority needs from regional and subbasin planning documents and that is making steady progress toward achieving its objectives. Much of the proposal and planned work is straightforward with simple monitoring planned to document that anticipated results are actually achieved.

No termination date is identified for the project even though sponsor comments indicate that approximately 10-13 years work will be needed to address passage issues in the John Day Basin. Even though such a termination date is uncertain and is some years out, a termination date should be identified for projects, rather than leaving them open-ended.

The ISRP has a programmatic concern on all projects proposing culvert replacement.

1. Prioritization of specific culvert?

2. How much habitat is made available?

3. What is the "quality" of the habitat?

This project has addressed these concerns within its proposal.

Technical and scientific justification: Fixing fish passage barriers is the focus of this project. Primary barriers are culverts and push-up dams. Excellent descriptions of problems with push-up dams and culverts at the specific watershed sites to be addressed by this project are included in the proposal. These are effectively illustrated with maps, graphs, and photographs of problem areas and fish-friendly alternatives.

Push-up dams and old makeshift diversion dams are to be replaced with removable flashboard dams and/or rock step-pool weirs, while poorly-installed culverts and other problematic road crossings (collapsed log bridges, etc) will be replaced with properly-sized culverts, bottomless arch culverts or small bridges. Funding is requested for $1,328,764 over the 3-year project period.

Priority areas are consistent with those identified in the John Day Subbasin Plan. Fish passage has been identified in the subbasin plan as a high-priority limiting factor.

Relationship of activities under this project to the Fish and Wildlife Program and to the subbasin plan is clear. The actions in this project are directly tied to specific priority restoration strategies in the subbasin plan. The proposal also discusses relationship to the draft recovery plan (not yet released) for Mid-Columbia steelhead. Project actions relate to RPA 149 in the 2000 BiOp.

Relationships to other projects: Examples are given of other projects this group works with: ODFW fish screens, multi-agency riparian habitat restoration, Oregon Water Trust irrigation efficiency projects, other SWCD upland conservation. The project will build on previous passage work of these SWCDs and others.

Project history: To date, this project has replaced 15 problematic irrigation diversions with fish friendly alternatives, with another 8 scheduled for replacement in 2006 (Map G). This represents over 60% of the problematic diversions in the initial project area. As initially developed, the project focused on eliminating push-up dams on the lower mainstem of the North Fork John Day. In 2003, sponsors started to emphasize works in tributaries, as low-flow passage barriers typically have much more impact in small streams that do provide summer habitat to salmonids.

Objectives: Five project objectives are clearly specified with quantitative measures of progress. Brief but clear descriptions of the intent of each objective are included. Timelines are not included.

Tasks (work elements) and methods: Work elements are specifically described. Methods have previously demonstrated effectiveness. Note is made of the need for voluntary cooperation of landowners, and that this may limit project success. However, a history of positive working relationships of the SWCD and landowners make failure unlikely.

Monitoring and evaluation: The project includes basic monitoring of effectiveness of actions -- habitat response to project implementation. Population response monitoring is done by other projects (ODFW, NOAA/BOR). Work elements are included for project effectiveness monitoring to collect data on: site changes (photopoints) and stream temperature. Monitoring, data collection, and analysis are done in collaboration with Monument SWCD. Primary use of project-generated monitoring is to assess effectiveness and guide project implementation.

The project also includes a monitoring component, which aims to 1) document the changes at project sites over time through photo monitoring, and 2) determine whether in fact push-up dams result in warming of downstream flows. Photo documentation has show gradual riparian recovery at the sites of old push-up dams. The temperature monitoring that has been collected has documented that specific types of push-up dams (in particular, ones that create long artificial side-channels in summer low flow conditions) can elevate water temperatures. Other types of push up dams do not have as clear a temperature signal.

Facilities, equipment, and personnel: Facilities are reasonable. A history of collaboration among SWCDs and among SWCDs and landowners make these groups uniquely qualified to implement these types of projects on private lands.

Information transfer: Project results to be reported in SWCD newsletters, reports and other publications of the SWCDs and watershed councils, local and regional media. If monitoring shows broadly applicable results, sponsors intend to summarize in more broadly distributed reports.

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