FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199604000: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Project

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Tom Scribner

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199604000
Proposal Name: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Project
BPA Project Manager: Roy Beaty
Agency, Institution or Organization: Yakama Confederated Tribes
Short Description: The long term vision of this restoration project is to restore coho salmon to the Wenatchee and Methow river basins at biologically sustainable levels that will support harvest in most years.
Information Transfer: The Mid-Columbia River Coho Restoration Program is being coordinated with fishery and natural resource agencies through a technical working group (TWG). This TWG is responsible for designing the research objectives associated with coho re-introduction based on project results and other programs in the region. They also help in project siting, environmental permitting, NEPA, ESA (Bi Ops) and M/E evaluation. The TWG meets semi-annually. In addition to the Yakama Nation, the TWG is comprised of technical personnel from the following agencies: • Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife • United States Fish & Wildlife Service • United States Forest Service • National Marine Fisheries Service • Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation • Nez Perce Tribe • Bonneville Power Administration Annually, project activity and results are presented to the TWG and status is written up for posting on BPA's Fish and Wildlife web site.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Tom Scribner Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation 4067 NE 23rd Ave.
Portland OR 97212
Ph: 503.331.9850
Fax: 503.331.9892
Email: scribner@easystreet.com
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Greg Ferguson Sea Springs Co. 46208 SE 139th Pl.
North Bend, WA 98045
Ph: 425 888 3404
Fax: 425 888 3895
Email: ghf@centurytel.net
Technical Contact
Keely Murdoch Yakama Nation Fisheries 7051 Highway 97
Peshastin, WA 98847
Ph: 509 548-2206
Fax: 509 548 2118
Email: keely@mid-columbia-coho.net
Technical Contact
Tom Scribner Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation 4067 NE 23rd Ave.
Portland OR 97212
Ph: 503.331.9850
Fax: 503.331.9892
Email: scribner@easystreet.com
Form Submitter
Judy Woodward Crossing Borders Communications 4511 NE Failing St.
Portland, OR 97213
Ph: 503 281 7762
Fax: 503 281 7762
Email: judith@netidea.com
Administrative Contact

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Cascade ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Wenatchee ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
Methow River Methow River and Tributaries Okanogan, Washington Methow No
Wenatchee River Wenatchee River and Tributaries Chelan, Washington Wenatchee Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Coho Unspecified Population

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Acclim/rel ~285K smolts in Met & ~ 993K local brood smolts Wen. Coho redd counts = 881 Wen & 43 Met. Natural production estimate is not yet available.
2004 Acclim/rel ~308K BY02 smolts in Met. & ~1.1M BY02 local brood smolts in Wen. BY02 SARs = NYA. Coho redd counts = 714 Wen. & 33 Met. BY02 nat prod smolts = 5826 wen.
2003 Acclim/rel ~242K smolts in Met. & ~913K local brood in Wen. SARs = 0.39% Wen, 0.11% Met. Replicate microhab eval with same results. Predation on spg. chin. fry <0.15%. No predation observed on sockeye fry. Redd counts = 625 Wen & 28 Met.
2002 Acclim/rel ~186K smolts in Met. & ~1M smolts in Wen. SAR= 0.40% Wen & 0.15% Met. Impl. microhabitat and competition evaluations with scatter planted coho. Sp Ch, Coho, & Sthd selected different microhabitats. Nat prod smolts = 17K Wen.
2001 Acclim/rel. ~260K smolts in Met.& ~997,458 smolts in Wenat. SAR = 0.03% Wen. & 0.03% Met. Assess potent. for predat by coho on sock. fry in Lk. Wenat. Minimal opportun. for pred. based on temporal and spatial overlap.Investig. coho pred. on sp.ch. < 1%
2000 Acclim/rel ~199,763 smolts in Met & ~968,738 smolts in the Wenat. SAR = 0.18% Wen & 0.17% Met. Collected 1st returning adults to the Wen. R. for develop. of locally adapted brood. PARTIAL STEP TWO REVIEW SUBMITTED AND APPROVED. Sum. Ch. predat. study.
1999 Acclim/rel. ~484,000 coho smolts;2 locations; Wenat. Basin. (.23% to .41% SAR)a signifi. improvement over Methow releases. Continued 1998 coho competition studies/steel.. No negative impacts. Hatch. coho pred. study on sp ch. Minimal predation. HGMP done.
1998 Acclimated/released ~341,146 coho smolts; 3 locations Methow Basin. (.059% SAR). Replicated 1997evaluat. of coho predation on fall ch. Predation negligible. Monitored hatchery coho residualism. Found minimal indication of residual. Evaluated competition.
1997 Acclimated/released ~69,200 coho smolts in Methow. Coldwa. disease caused a poor return (.004% SAR). Observed macrohabitat utilization. Minimal spatial overlap between yrl. coho and YOY sp ch and steel. Eval. coho predation on Fall Ch. Consum. < 0.1%.
1996 Acclimated/released ~335,000 coho smolts; 2 locations Methow Basin. Coldwater disease caused low adult return (.003% SAR). Evaluated interaction hatchery coho smolts upon emergent sum. ch. fry. Snorkel surveys; sum. ch. fry too large to be vulnerable.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
Other: USFWS [no entry] Grand Coulee Fish Maintenance Project (GCFMP) The USFWS operates the Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Complex (Leavenworth NFH, Entiat NFH, Winthrop NFH). The complex was constructed by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) to replace fish losses that resulted from construction of Grand Coulee Dam. These programs were authorized as part of the GCFMP on April 3, 1937, and re-authorized by the Mitchell Act (52 Stat. 345) on May 11, 1938. The Leavenworth NFH complex works closely in support of the current coho reintroduction feasibility study The proposed Master Plan continues to share facilities and resources with all three federal hatcheries that comprise the Leavenworth NFH complex.
Other: NOAA [no entry] Mitchell Act Since 1988 and under the jurisdiction of U.S. v. Oregon, lower Columbia River Mitchell Act hatcheries been reprogrammed to provide coho salmon smolts for release in upriver areas, including the Wenatchee and Methow basins. Smolts grown at Cascade and Willard hatcheries which are Mitchell facilities are offspring of coho that returned to the mid-Columbia and provide the basis for reintroduction efforts in these two Columbia River basins. Up to 90% of the coho salmon proposed for release in this Master Plan will be reared in Mitchell Act facilities.
BPA 199506325 YKFP - Monitoring And Evaluation The Yakama Nation is the lead agency in both Mid-Columbia and Yakima coho restoration projects. Both are high-priority NPCC projects, are in the Tribal Recovery Plan, are legally binding under U.S. v. Oregon, and have similar overall goals. Personnel from both projects meet as needed to review feasibility progress and results. Several studies in both projects have inter-basin application. For example, the predation studies of coho on sensitive species completed in both projects confirmed minimal interactions between coho and other salmonids. Both projects adaptively manage in response to results and peer review. Joint meetings of the two projects are held annually to coordinate objectives, production, research needs, and monitoring results.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2002-4-01 Wenatchee Basin Riparian Enhancement This purchase of riparian habitat adjacent to Peshastin Creek will add to habitat protection for coho and other species in this Wenatchee River tributary.
BPA 200301700 Integrated Status/Effect Program The Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program (ISEMP, BPA #2003-017-00) is a system-wide, multi-agency effort to implement a subbasin-scale pilot program to monitor status and trends of anadromous salmonids and their habitat in the Wenatchee, John Day, and Upper Salmon River basins; and to monitor the effectiveness of suites of habitat restoration projects in selected watersheds within the three target subbasins. This work builds on current status and trend monitoring programs. Several regional and local organizations are funding and implementing these programs. Much of the work proposed in the M&E plan is closely tied to activities under the ISEMP, including but not limited to smolt population estimates, smolt survival estimates, and species distribution. The ISEMP will continue to provide data to assist in the evaluation of coho reintroduction, and the coho reintroduction M&E project will also contribute to the ISEMP.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2003-4-12 Hancock Springs Restoration This YN habitat restoration project of a spring fed tributary of the Methow River will provide off channel rearing for naturalize coho that are part of the re-introduction project.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2004-4-09 Upper Columbia Project Development Coordinator Employment of 1.0 FTE to focus on project proposal development, funding coordination and implementation for activities in the Upper Columbia (Wenatchee, Entiat, and Methow) region. The basic premise of this project development coordinator is that more successful proposals, benefiting the resource and maintaining a significant and sustained Yakama Nation presence in the Upper Columbia, will be developed if an individual is dedicated to this effort, rather than relying on intermittent and inconsistent efforts. Additionally, thoughtful organization or packaging of proposals will provide for a wider spectrum of funding sources. Allocation of position responsibilities is divided between Wenatchee, Entiat and Methow subbasins with an emphasis on the following priorities: Wenatchee - projects associated with the mainstem Channel Migration Zone study; Nason Creek coho acclimation and general salmonid spawning and rearing habitat; and White River habitat acquisition. Entiat - In-channel structures and riparian revegetation within the lower mainstem reaches; and habitat enhancements and acquisiton in the upper Stillwaters area. Methow - Twisp River and Upper Methow coho acclimation sites; Twisp River habitat enhancement, floodplain acquisition, channel re-connection; Beaver Creek steelhead habitat enhancement and potential kelt reconditioning.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2005-1-01 Coho Salmon Production Project This coho re-introduction project for the Clearwater Basin in Idaho is being implemented by the Nez Perce Tribe. They are a member of our Mid-Columbia Coho Technical Workgroup. Their data is shared with this project at annual meetings of the TWG.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2005-1-02 Clearwater River Coho Salmon M This coho re-introduction project for the Clearwater Basin in Idaho is being implemented by the Nez Perce Tribe. They are a member of our Mid-Columbia Coho Technical Workgroup. Their data and analysis from their M & E plan is shared with this project and others at annual meetings of the TWG.
Other: PCSRF-CRITFC 2005-4-03 Nason Creek Wetlands Acquisition Land purchased by YN in order to protect and enhance 26 acres of beaver dam wetlands complex and manage the site to provide for salmon passage to spawning areas and overwinter rearing habitat. These wetlands are located in an important reach of Nason Creek, at RM 7, that provides spawning and rearing habitat for ESA listed spring chinook and steelhead along with coho and bull trout. The creek has been largely channelized and cut off from the floodplain.
Other: Chelan/Douglas PUDs 943&2145 / 2149 Habitat Conservation Plan - M & E for Hatchery Mitigation The proposed M&E plan is closely integrated with the Chelan PUD and Douglas PUD HCPs' M&E plans through the sharing of resources and data collection.
Other: Chelan/Douglas PUDs 943&2145 / 2149 Habitat Conservation Plan - Coho Compensation/Mitigation The proposed coho program is consistent with and supported by the mid-Columbia Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP) for Rock Island (FERC # 943), Rocky Reach (FERC # 2145) and Wells Dams (FERC # 2149). The Rock Island HCP will provide mitigation for coho salmon “following the development of a continuing coho hatchery program and/or the establishment of a naturally reproducing population of coho” (HCP 2002). Hatchery compensation under the Rocky Reach and Wells Dam HCPs will occur following the development of a continuing coho hatchery program, development of a long-term coho hatchery program, and/or the establishment of a threshold population of naturally reproducing coho in the Methow Basin.
Other: Chelan/Douglas PUDs 943&2145 / 2149 Mid-Columbia HCP Tributary Conservation Plans Under the Rock Island (FERC Project # 943), Rocky Reach (FERC Project # 2145), and Wells Dam (FERC Project # 2149) Habitat Conservation Plans (HCPs), Chelan and Douglas County Public Utility Districts will fund habitat improvement projects for the protection and restoration of Plan Species’ habitat within the Columbia River watershed, and the Okanogan, Methow, Entiat, and Wenatchee River watersheds. Coho salmon will be considered a Plan Species if certain criteria are met. Habitat improvements will improve coho salmon spawning and rearing habitat in the primary tributaries identified for coho restoration.
Other: Grant PUD FERC # 2114 Grant County PUD Settlement Agreement Grant County PUD is currently in negotiations with the fisheries management agencies and tribes on finalizing a Settlement Agreement related to fish mitigation that would become a FERC license article associated with the re-licensing of Priest Rapids and Wanapum dams. Coho mitigation language within this Agreement mirrors the HCPs of the other Mid-Columbia PUDs. The draft Agreement states that if criteria are met on establishment of a coho hatchery program and/or a naturally reproducing population, Grant PUD will provide mitigation to compensate for smolt losses at their two projects Grant County PUD is currently in negotiations with the fisheries management agencies and tribes on finalizing a Settlement Agreement related to fish mitigation that would become a FERC license article associated with the re-licensing of Priest Rapids and Wanapum dams. Coho mitigation language within this Agreement mirrors the HCPs of the other Mid-Columbia PUDs. The draft Agreement states that if criteria are met on establishment of a coho hatchery program and/or a naturally reproducing population, Grant PUD will provide mitigation to compensate for smolt losses at their two projects thus providing another potential funding partner for the coho reintroduction project. This Agreement is in its final phase of negotiation. This Agreement is in its final phase of negotiation.
Other: Chelan PUD FERC 943 HCP Hatchery Mitigation YN personnel have helped staff WDFW’s Monitor Smolt Trap for data collection during the spring smolt emigration in Wenatchee Basin. WDFW provides the YN with an annual population estimate for naturally produced coho.
Other: Chelan PUD FERC 943 HCP Hatchery Mitigation The YN operated smolt trap funded by BPA, collects data from other emigrating naturally produced and hatchery produced salmonids under the HCP umbrella.
Other: Chelan/Douglas PUDs FERC 943/2149 HCP Steelhead Hatchery Mitigation The current feasibility study and the proposed coho master plan share trapping facilities with HCP steelhead hatchery programs, to include trapping at Dryden Dam, Tumwater Dam, and Wells Dam. At each of these facilities, YN personnel and WDFW operate the collection facilities together, reducing the personnel trapping needs for both programs.
Other: Chelan/Douglas PUDs FERC 943/2149 HCP Hatchery Mitigation Hatchery coho are commonly used to evaluate the trap efficiency at both WDFW smolt trap located near Monitor in the Wenatchee River, and the WDFW/DCPUD smolt trap in the Methow River.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee "the vision is to restore extirpated wildlife and fisheries." xii
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee "The focal species selected for this assessment include spring chinook salmon, late-run chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon..." xxi
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee "Goal 3. Restore, maintain, or enhance fish and wildlife populations to sustainable and harvestable levels." xii
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee "The [coho] restoration program is generally in its infancy but the YN and other resource mgrs. intend to continue and expand the reintroduction effort in the province." 21
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 8: "Species diversity and the biotic community are a reflection of the ecosystem attributes and those attributes can be estimated by intensive study of focal or indicator species. Coho salmon are a focal species in the Wen Subbasin Plan 26
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 10: "Restoration of individual populations may not be possible without restoration of other fish and wildlife population with which they co-evolved." 27
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 11: "Reintroduction [coho] or supplementation programs should concentrate on specific environments within the basin." 27
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 11: "Selection of an appropriate stock for reintroduction ...or locally adapting a donor stock [coho] where a local stock no longer exists." 27
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 12: "for former populations that have had entire metapopulations extirpated from the basin and adjacent basins, emphasis on recovery actions is better focused on rebuilding population structure than on habitat restoration." 28
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Wenatchee "Coho are a focal species with representative habitats including lower mid-elevation mainstem and tributaries, side channels, and backwater areas." Tributaries include Nason Ck, Chiwawa R. White R. & Little Wen. 29
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "The goal for coho salmon includes re-establishment of run sizes that provide for species recovery, mitigation of hydro-system losses, and harvestable surplus." xxi
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "A focal species has special ecological, cultural, or legal status and represents a management priority in the Methow subbasin." Coho salmon are a focal species in the Methow Subbasin. 33
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "Currently the Yakama Nation is leading feasibility plans to reintroduce coho salmon to the Methow by and in cooperation with the WDFW and the USFWS." "Mullan (1984) estimated that 23,000-31,000 coho historically spawned in the Methow River." 77
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "Historically the Methow River produced more coho than chinook or steelhead (Craig and Suomela 1941). Today coho reintroduction is identified as a priority in the Tribal Restoration Plan, NPCC" and in the Methow Subbasin Plan. 79
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "While the historic stock of coho salmon are considered extirpated in the Upper Columbia River, the species has since been reintroduced to the Methow Basin. In cooperation with the WDFW and USFWS, theYN is leading the coho salmon recovery efforts." 79
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "As the recovery program continues, reintroduction of coho to tributaries within the Methow Basin will aid in species dispersal." 79
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow "Coho returning to the Methow Basin are primarily hatchery origin but include an increasing naturally produced component. It is likely that continued broodstock development and hatchery supplementation will be necessary to prevent future extirpation." 81
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. Wenatchee "Continued development of a locally adapted broodstock is essential to ensure future populations of spawning coho salmon in the Wenatchee River." 305
Develop locally adapted coho populations Develop locally adapted, naturally spawning coho populations in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins by 2026. We propose to increase the fitness of reintroduced coho salmon by reducing domestication and emphasizing local adaptation. The program will use strict broodstock collection protocols which ultimately will place a limit on the proportion of natural origin adults in the hatchery program and place a limit on the proportion of hatchery origin adults on the spawning ground. The broodstock collection protocols are intended to manage the broodstock composition to increase the proportion of natural influence (PNI) in the population with the goal of having a PNI value greater than 0.50; that is, the natural environment must have a greater influence on the population than the hatchery environment. This objective will be considered successfull when the following numeric goals have been achieved: Goal 1 - The 3-year mean escapement of natural origin returns in the Wenatchee (upstream of Tumwater Dam) and the Methow river subbasins exceeds 1500 per subbasin; Goal 2 - Achieve a total harvest rate of 23%, which includes a 10% mixed stock harvest, 10% mainstem harvest, and 5% terminal harvest in most years. Methow Coho salmon are specifically listed as a focal species for the following: Lower, Middle, Upper-Middle, Upper Methow, Early Winters, Lost River, Twisp River, Chewuch River and others. 301-353
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction in mid-Columbia tributaries. The goal of the M&E program is to monitor and evaluate the results of reintroduction so that operations can be adaptively managed to optimize hatchery and natural production while minimizing any negative ecological interactions. Pursing this goal, research data collection and analysis is structured to: 1) demonstrate when the reintroduction program is meeting the established phased restoration goals; 2) determine whether a change in status of sensitive species is occuring and whether it is a result of coho reintroduction; and 3) provide science-based recommendations for management consideration. Wenatchee Recommended protocols and sampling frequency for biological indicator variables; adults, redds, parr/juveniles and smolts. 350-353
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction in mid-Columbia tributaries. The goal of the M&E program is to monitor and evaluate the results of reintroduction so that operations can be adaptively managed to optimize hatchery and natural production while minimizing any negative ecological interactions. Pursing this goal, research data collection and analysis is structured to: 1) demonstrate when the reintroduction program is meeting the established phased restoration goals; 2) determine whether a change in status of sensitive species is occuring and whether it is a result of coho reintroduction; and 3) provide science-based recommendations for management consideration. Methow "These studies indicate that re-introduction of coho should have little to no effect on the production of chinook and steelhead." 169
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee "Increased habitat diversity... would increase the success of naturally spawning coho and increase productivity." 305
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 12: "If the goal of cost-effective restoration is to be achieved subbasin planners need to assess the optimal mix of habitat restoration and population structure restoration to achieve biological goals." 28
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee Guiding Principle 12: "If the goal of cost-effective restoration is to be achieved subbasin planners need to assess the optimal mix of habitat restoration and population structure restoration to achieve biological goals." 28
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Methow "The ideal result would restore coho populations to their historic levels. Because of varying degrees of habitat degradation, historic numbers are unlikely ever to be achieved but remain a goal towards which to strive." 81
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Methow "Habitat complexity and off channel habitats such as backwater pools, beaver ponds, and side channels are important for juvenile rearing making coho good biological indicators of these areas." 79
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee "Coho salmon prefer and occupy different habitat types, selecting slower velocities and greater depths than the other focal species; Habitat complexity and off-channel habitats are important for juvenile rearing making coho good biological indicators." 71
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee "Spawning areas for coho salmon in Nason Creek have been compromised by loss of riparian area and LWD recruitment channel stability, and general diversity." 178
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee "Coho spawning occurs in the Wenatchee River and Icicle Creek where increases in sediment deposition, channel confinement and higher flow rates have most likely reduced incubation success." 178-179
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee "Coho spawning habitat in the Little Wenatchee River remains in good condition; Largely unaltered coho spawning habitat exists in the Chiwawa and White Rivers." 178-179
Increase freshwater productivity Increase the freshwater productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. Currently many tributaries to the Wenatchee and Methow rivers lack habitat of sufficient quantity and quality to sustain coho populations productive enough to overcome the handicap of passing 7-9 mainstem dams. Productivity will be increased through coordination with ongoing and planned habitat restoration activites within the mid-Columbia as part of a comprehensive program to restore naturally spawning coho salmon populations. Wenatchee "Natural coho production in the Wenatchee sub-basin could increase if habitat problems within Nason Creek, Icicle Ck, Peshastin Ck were improved. Preservation of quality habitat in L. Wenatchee, White and Chiwawa would insure high quality areas intact" 178-179

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Produce environmental compliance documentation for all applicable work on coho reintroduction work. Environmental compliance work and associated documentation will be completed prior to work commencing. Covers any work that by the contractor or subcontractors to assemble, gather, acquire or prepare documents in support of obtaining environmental compliance from BPA (such as providing maps, obtaining permit, providing written documents to NOAA and USFWS as required. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $875,330
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Increase freshwater productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Design and/or Specifications Develop facility plans, designs, and specifications Sub-contract preliminary and final plans for evaluation by project team of future rearing, acclimation, incubation, and spawning facilities, conceptual designs and cost estimates for preferred future sites and their alternatives, and design improvements to exisiting sites. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $893,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
No Metrics for this Work Element

c: Council 3-step Process: Step 2 NPPC Step Two review for proposed facilities Prepare and present preliminary design, cost estimates, NEPA, and ESA environmental review summaries to the NPPCC. 6/1/2008 9/30/2008 $80,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
No Metrics for this Work Element

d: Council 3-step Process: Step 3 NPPC Step Three review for proposed facilities Prepare and present Step 3 review documents; a summary of the final designs to the NPPCC. 10/1/2008 12/31/2009 $28,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
No Metrics for this Work Element

f: Identify and Select Projects Identify, select, and write proposals to fund habitat improvement projects Identify, select, and solicit funds to implement habitat improvement in key areas to increase the productivity of coho salmon in the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $120,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Increase freshwater productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

g: Manage and Administer Projects Manage and administer projects for mid-Columbia coho restoration Coordinate the continued use of facilities and agreements with WDFW, USFWS, CCPUD, DCPUD, GCPUD, and private landowners to discuss project use of each entities property in 2007-2009. Submit draft SW budget documents 90-days before contract renewal. Maintain Pisces metric reporting. Secure necessary land use agreements with private landowners. Also includes budget preparation and program management and administration for the Yakama Nation mid-Columbia coho program. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $798,510
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Increase freshwater productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

h: Maintain Hatchery Maintain Hatchery - Operate and maintain project facilities Operate and maintain facilities used for coho adult collection, acclimation, incubation, and hauling trucks. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $249,619
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
No Metrics for this Work Element

i: Produce Hatchery Fish Produce hatchery fish in the Wenatchee and Methow Subbasins 1) transport coho broodstock from Dryden Dam, Dam 5, Tumwater Dam, and Wells Dam to spawning facilities; 2) spawn coho salmon at ENFH and WNFH to meet broodstock development goals; 3) incubate eggs at the Peshastin Incubation Facility (up to 50% of eggs taken at ENFH); 4) Transport eyed eggs from incubation facilities at ENFH, WNFH and Peshastin Incubation Facility to Cascade FH and Willard NFH for rearing; 5) transport coho pre-smolts to acclimation release sites; 6) Acclimate and release coho smolts in the Wenatchee and Methow Basins. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $1,541,464
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
* Rearing: # smolts into program: Acclimation of 1.25 Million Smolts
* Broodstock collection: # of non-clip (natural origin) fish: Total of 1950 adult coho in Wenatchee & Methow
* Incubation: # fertilized eggs into incubation program.: Early incubation of 1.7M green eggs
* Broodstock collection: # of non-clip (natural origin) fish: Transport from trap sites to holding sites
* Incubation: # fertilized eggs into incubation program.: Transport eyed eggs from inc. fac. to rear fac.

j: Produce Hatchery Fish Produce hatchery fish for reintroduction in the Wenatchee and Methow Basins Through subcontract with USFWS and WDFW, rear hatchery fish at Winthrop NFH, and Willard NFH, through Mitchell Act cost share rear hatchery fish at Cascade Hatchery, acclimate hatchery fish at Wells FH and Leavenworth NFH, hold and spawn adult coho salmon at Entiat NFH. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $1,896,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
* Rearing: # smolts into program: 1.5 million smolts

k: Trap/Collect/Hold/Transport Fish - Hatchery Transport pre-smolts from rearing facilities to acclimation sites Through sub-contract with ODFW, transport coho pre-smolts from rearing facilities at Cascade FH and Willard NFH to acclimation sites in the Wenatchee and Methow Basins. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $72,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
* # of ad-clip (hatchery origin) juveniles (presmolt): Transport up to 1.25 M pre-smolts

l: Mark/Tag Animals Through sub-contract CWT 100% of hatchery production Through sub-contract with the USFWS all coho released under this program will be marked with a CWT (ad present) up to 500K will also be marked with a body CWT. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $1,200,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

m: Mark/Tag Animals PIT tag and release 30,000 coho smolts annually PIT tagged coho will provide downstream survival rate estimates, in-pond survival estimates, and stream residence time estimates. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $236,250
Biological Objectives Metrics
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Primary R, M, and E Type: PIT tag up to 30,000 juvenile coho annually

n: Analyze/Interpret Data Calculate juvenile survival rates from release to McNary Dam and in-pond survival Covers work of a subcontractor to analyze data and report smolt survival rates and in-pond survival. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $12,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Primary R, M, and E Type: Analyze survival data

o: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Collect field data for implementation of the proposed M&E Plan Collect data: PIT tag detections for estimation of in-pond survival, pre-release fish condition, volitional release run-timing and tributary residence, spawning escapement and distribution, natural smolt production, egg-to-emigrant survival, NTTOC size, abundance, and distribution, coho rearing distribution, CWT recovery. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $1,009,657
Biological Objectives Metrics
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Primary R, M, and E Type: Action effectiveness and uncertainties research

p: Create/Manage/Maintain Database Create/Manage/Maintain database Maintain database of CWT recovery and morphometrics, rotary smolt trap collections, and PIT tag release and interrogation files. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $123,552
Biological Objectives Metrics
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

q: Analyze/Interpret Data Analyze and interpret data collected Analysis of data includes: smolt-to-adult survival for hatchery and natural origin coho, natural smolt production estimates, spawning escapement, spawning distribution, rearing distribution, in-pond survival, volitional release run-timing and tributary residence, and NTTOC status monitoring, fish condition and release numbers. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $98,691
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
No Metrics for this Work Element

r: Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Produce status report for coho restoration activities Produce status report for coho restoration activities. Update status of milestones monthly using the Pisces System. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $3,600
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Increase freshwater productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

s: Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Produce Annual Report This report will detail accomplishments for each work element: were deliverables produced; and if not, why? - succinctly documents contract performance for the public record. It will summarize, evaluate, analyze, discuss and disseminate information gathered during project activities in a scientific format. 2/1/2007 1/31/2010 $109,721
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop locally adapted coho populations
Evaluate the efficacy of coho reintroduction
Increase freshwater productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel M&E Personnel $262,000 $262,000 $262,000
Fringe Benefits M&E Fringe $46,000 $46,000 $46,000
Supplies M&E Supplies and Materials $15,000 $15,000 $15,000
Other M&E Vehicles and Mileage $43,200 $43,200 $43,200
Other M&E Housing $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Other M&E PIT Tags - BPA direct pay $78,750 $78,750 $78,750
Other M&E Mass Marking - USFWS Subcontract $400,000 $400,000 $400,000
Travel M&E Travel and Per Diem $15,500 $15,500 $15,500
Capital Equipment M&E: Rotary Smolt Trap and Back Pack Electrofisher $22,000 $ 0 $ 0
Other M&E Statistical Consulting Subcontract $4,000 $4,000 $4,000
Personnel O&M Personnel $349,161 $349,161 $349,161
Fringe Benefits O&M Fringe $69,700 $69,700 $69,700
Supplies O&M Supplies and Equipment $30,500 $30,500 $30,500
Other O&M Vehicles and Mileage $69,250 $69,250 $69,250
Other O&M Housing $21,600 $21,600 $21,600
Other O&M Standby Electrical and Systems Maintainence Subcontract - emergency repairs for electricial pump systems (acclimation), chillers (incubation), plumbing etc. $19,000 $19,000 $19,000
Capital Equipment O&M: 500 gal fish transport truck (2 qty), CWT detection Wands (3qty) $14,000 $21,000 $ 0
Travel O&M Travel and Per Diem $12,150 $12,150 $12,150
Overhead G&A Administration $76,000 $76,000 $76,000
Overhead G&A Administration Fringe $13,700 $13,700 $13,700
Overhead G&A Office/facility maint. - Maintence, utilities and rent for field stations, and work sites. $58,350 $58,350 $58,350
Overhead G&A Indirect $195,894 $195,894 $195,894
Other O&M Subcontracted Rearing Costs - Willard NFH and Winthrop NFH, Acclimaiton support at Leavenworth NFH. $632,000 $632,000 $632,000
Other O&M Fish Hauling Subcontract (ODFW) to haul up to 1.25 M coho presmolts from rearing facilities (Willard NFH and Cascade FH) to acclimation site in the Wenatchee and Methow Subbasins. $24,000 $24,000 $24,000
Other P&D: Facilities Planning Design and Permitting: NPCC Review - Step 1, 2 & 3; Preliminary and Final Facility Design; NEPA scoping; NEPA Draft EIS; NEPA Final EIS & ROD; ESA - Edit HGMP & BA, Public & Agency Review; Water Rights, JARPA, Critical Areas. $993,590 $469,873 $412,867
Other O&M Land Lease Costs $14,000 $14,000 $14,000
Totals $3,500,945 $2,962,228 $2,884,222

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$9,347,394
Total Work Element budget$9,347,394

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
CCPUD Fish Trap Maintainence - Dryden and Tumwater Dams $4,500 $4,500 $4,500 In-Kind Confirmed
NMFS Rearing at Cascade and Willard hatcheries $405,000 $405,000 $405,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW/CCPUD Smolt trap operation - Wenatchee River at Monitor $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW/CCPUD Smolt trap operation - Upper Wenatchee Trap $57,000 $57,000 $57,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW/CCPUD Smolt trap operation - Chiwawa River $80,000 $80,000 $80,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW/DCPUD Smolt trap operation - Methow River $220,000 $220,000 $220,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW/DCPUD Smolt trap operation - Twisp River $103,000 $103,000 $103,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW/GCPUD Smolt trap operation - White River $110,000 $110,000 $110,000 In-Kind Confirmed
Totals $1,179,500 $1,179,500 $1,179,500

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$7,188,000 $5,327,000 Major facilities construction is planned to occur in 2010 & 2011
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
O&M costs peak in 2012 at $3,408,000 per year. These costs decrease until 2026 when the project ends.
 
Termination Date Comments
2026 The program is designed so that it can be discontinued after 5 generations of supplementation unless it can be clearly demonstrated that continued supplementation is needed to prevent extirpation.
 
Final Deliverables
Monitoring and Evaluation reports and Acclimation and Broodstock reports will be produced annually.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Both Capital and Expense
Location:
Province: No Change
Subbasin: No Change
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments: [none]


BPA Capital/Expense Review Results (March 14, 2006) [Download full document]

Initial BPA Capital/Expense Determination (Subject to final review):
Expense until completion of Step 3
Primary Uncertainty for Capitalization: ---


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Do Not Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: See Washington guidance


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: The sponsors responded sufficiently to the queries posed in the ISRP preliminary review of the project. Most of the questions are dealt with in greater detail in the ISRP Step One Review. For completeness, brief ISRP responses to this follow-up are provided here.

The sponsors responded to the ISRP recommendation for Fundable-in-part, for completing the Three-Step process, by identifying that funding for 07/09 was for continued feasibility level fish culture operations and completing the Three-Step process. No funds for construction or expanded fish culture operations are in the FY 07/09 budget. The ISRP thanks the sponsors for this clarification. The final funding level is a matter for Council and BPA, but the ISRP notes that the ISRP’s preliminary Fundable in Part recommendation in fact includes all the activities that they are requesting support for.

The ISRP recommended in the preliminary proposal review, and in the Master Plan Step One Review that sponsors alter the primary biological objective from "biologically sustainable" to "naturally self-sustaining population." The sponsors provide an adequate summary of the history of the development of the primary objective and use of the term "biologically sustainable." They provide their rationale for using the term:

"Our use of "biologically sustainable" does not make any assumptions about whether future hatchery supplementation will be required. Very early versions of the Master Plan included the term "self-sustaining" in the vision statement. The term was eliminated after much consideration by the Mid-Columbia Coho Technical Work Group because no other species of anadromous salmonid within the upper Columbia currently is self-sustaining. All other species of salmon and steelhead receive supplementation of some kind. Inclusion of the term "self-sustaining" may unintentionally predispose the project for failure in terms of whether or not a realistic vision is achieved."

This rationale is exactly the reason the ISRP continues to recommend changing "biologically sustainable" to "naturally self-sustaining." The ISRP recognized that biologically sustainable could be interpreted to mean “supported indefinitely by hatchery-origin adults.” In the present case, however, the project proponents have clearly designed a program that implies it is going to proceed to entirely natural production. It is the hedges that appear occasionally in the Master Plan and in this reply that back away from the schedule to attain self-sustaining status that is of concern to the ISRP. It is worth attempting to reintroduce coho and achieve self-sustaining status. If that is the goal, a production and habitat restoration plan needs to be designed to accomplish that task. If it does not work, then the program can be altered at the end of the experimental phase. This might be a harvest augmentation program, as the sponsors identify in the Master Plan, or it might be some other integrated hatchery program.

The ISRP emphasizes that integrated hatchery programs that include a goal of keeping the artificial and natural components genetically similar, and adapted to the natural environment, require the natural population to be self-sustaining, require the proportion of natural-origin adults in the hatchery broodstock to exceed the proportion of hatchery-origin adults in the wild. Finally, the total number of salmon used for broodstock (NOR plus HOR) cannot exceed the natural-origin escapement that spawns in streams.

In response to the ISRP comment that the project was ambitious and it did not appear that the sponsors had given themselves much time to address unanticipated challenges, sponsors provided a verbatim copy of section 4.3.5 Contingency Plans and Decision Processes from the Master Plan. The ISRP acknowledges this contingency plan. In the ISRP Step One Review we do not explicitly address the contingency plan, but do suggest when addressing the consistency of the Master Plan with Council Artificial Production principles, that the ISRP recommends adhering to a rigid schedule of transition through the broodstock development and natural production phases of the reintroduction. The contingency plan is appropriate in that it poses questions of whether the difficulties encountered can be surmounted, but it is of concern to the ISRP that it extends the phases or exits to a harvest augmentation program fairly early in the reintroduction effort if not successful at achieving that stage's goals. In our more lengthy step review we recommend establishing a schedule of pHOS, and pNOB, and following it strictly through the generations of this experimental reintroduction. If the reintroduction is ultimately determined to be infeasible, options for a harvest augmentation program, whether integrated or segregated will not be lost. However, if this reintroduction experiment focuses on release numbers and relaxes the fish culture practices to maintain high production, then the reintroduction itself could be compromised.

The reintroduction could be compromised by the focus on a rearing and release schedule rather than on a broodstock mating protocol for pHOS and pNOB because it is this protocol that will provide the "selection" that will lead to the hoped for adaptation of the lower river stock to the mid-Columbia tributaries. In the broodstock development phase two, releasing fish in upper areas of the watershed and then use the returns of these fish for broodstock is suppose to provide the opportunity to select parents that have exhibited the stamina and other behaviors to migrate to the release sites. If these fish are spawned with individuals from families that have not exhibited those capabilities, and these fish predominate in the pool of parents, you could actually be selecting against the genotypes that you hope to increase in proportion in the population. The same rationale holds for the natural production initiation and support phases.

The sponsors indicate that they will use standard metrics to evaluate the productivity of their program. The ISRP recommended that adult replacement rate would be based on female to female, and certainly not include jacks. The ISRP points out that even the female-to-female replacement rate may not be sufficient under all circumstances, if the age structure of the female offspring differ across generations or between eggs incubated in the streams versus those incubated and then reared in a hatchery. Under these circumstances the appropriate measure would be each generation's egg production. This requires estimating the fecundity of females of different sizes and ages each generation, and estimating the proportions of females in body size (and age) categories. The data to estimate the egg production should be available since fish will be collected for hatchery spawning and fish released for natural spawning will be enumerated at weirs. Sponsors indicate that the data that is collected is sufficient to calculate the female-to-female metric. The ISRP is satisfied that these metrics can be evaluated.

Finally, the sponsors clarify the plan to construct acclimation ponds. In general the ISRP was encouraged that expanding hatchery facilities within the subbasins to produce smolts was not necessary. The ISRP thanks the sponsors for clarifying the construction schedule. The ISRP remains concerned about the environmental conditions that may develop from feed and feces that could accumulate in semi-natural acclimation ponds that are not as easily cleaned as traditional raceways. Additional discussion of the specifics of this type of fish culture issue would improve the Master Plan.

Fundable (qualified) with the qualification being that the sponsors revise the Master Plan before proceeding to Step Two, and that they fully address the ISRP concerns about clearly establishing unambiguous biological objectives.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable in part
NPCC Comments: This proposal is subject to concurrent Step Review with Step 1 to be completed by Aug 1, 2006. The ISRP recommends funding this project at a base level in order to proceed with the Three-Step process and development of the Step 1 documents and analysis.

The proposal presents a thorough discussion of the challenges to reintroducing coho salmon to the mid-Columbia and outlined their strategy to do so. This proposal is for a combination of fish culture operations and monitoring and evaluation investigations for ongoing initial efforts to reintroduce coho to the Wenatchee and Methow subbasins, and to move from step-1 to step-2 and 3 in the Three-Step Review to expand these operations from a feasibility evaluation to a full execution.

The proponents have reported here, and in annual reports the results of their ongoing efforts. The proponents should be encouraged to disseminate their findings more widely in the basin and in the fisheries field by publication and presentation at regional/national conferences.

The program vision on page 53: "To restore coho salmon runs to the Wenatchee and Methow river basins at biologically sustainable levels that will support harvest in most years" serves as a reasonable overarching objective. Proponents should be encouraged to change "biologically sustainable" to naturally self-sustaining. Biologically sustainable is an ambiguous term without a clear definition of success.

The sub-objectives are reasonable for the scope and scale of the project, and have numerical targets and timeframes.

The proposal is quite ambitious in its goal and timeline. The proponents presume the success of their efforts and do not seem to have factored in the inevitable problems that are going to arise. Proponents recognize on page 8: "We have found very little research documenting naturalization or local adaptation of a domesticated hatchery stock." This serves as the basis of a cautious approach to these programs that has appeared in ISRP (and other) recommendations for this type of action. The program should continue to be monitored carefully and implemented in a step-wise fashion.

The methods are adequately described. The proponents are planning on adopting a progressive reintroduction of coho to these subbasins - first transitioning from using lower Columbia River coho eggs to using returns of these fish to the Wenatchee and Methow for "in situ" egg production, then moving the egg take up stream to habitat closer to the anticipated natural spawning reaches, and then transitioning to natural spawning by returning hatchery adults and then finally natural spawning by naturally produced adults.

The general strategy is consistent with recommendations for integrated natural x hatchery programs. Proponents plan on moving toward a PNI (proportion of natural influence) that will be dominated by the natural system. This brief review as part of the 2007 solicitation precludes reconfirming many of the calculations in their proposal. Inspection of their numbers raises some questions that can be answered during step-2 and step-3 reviews.

The monitoring and evaluation proposed should be sufficient. One important point is the proponents plan on measuring adult-to-adult production for natural and hatchery populations which is a good idea. But they say their calculation will include jacks. The important adult-to-adult production is based on females. They should plan on being able to partition their production into sex and age classes to confirm that the number of eggs being laid in one generation are being replaced in the next.

Regarding facilities, an important but inadequately addressed question is the necessity of adding more acclimation ponds to the subbasins.

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