FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 200203100: Growth modulation in salmon supplementation

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Don Larsen

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 200203100
Proposal Name: Growth modulation in salmon supplementation
BPA Project Manager: Deborah Docherty
Agency, Institution or Organization: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Short Description: This project assesses and develops methods to control high rates of early male maturation in salmon supplementation programs. Reductions in early male maturation will increase smolt to adult survival and reduce negative genetic and ecological impacts
Information Transfer: Information from through this ongoing project has and will continue to be reported in contract reports, peer reviewed publications, at regional and national meetings and used to direct hatchery reform stratagies in the Yakima River Subbasin and in all salmon production and supplementation programs thoughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Don Larsen Northwest Fisheries Science Center 2725 Montlake Blvd E F/NWC2
Seattle WA 98112
Ph: 206.860.3462
Fax: ..
Email: don.larsen@noaa.gov
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Don Larsen Northwest Fisheries Science Center 2725 Montlake Blvd E F/NWC2
Seattle WA 98112
Ph: 206.860.3462
Fax: ..
Email: don.larsen@noaa.gov
Project Lead

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: Columbia Plateau
Sponsor Subbasin: Yakima ARG Subbasin: Yakima
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
Stream Hatchery Chelan, Washington Methow No
Stream Hatchery Chelan, Washington Wenatchee No
Stream Hatchery Chelan, Washington Entiat No
Stream Hatchery Wallowa, Oregon Imnaha No
Stream Hatchery (Lostine) Wallowa, Oregon Grande Ronde No
stream Throughout the Yakima basin Kittitas, Washington Yakima Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer ESU

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Monitored wild and hatchery Yak. Chinook, continued production scale growth study, completed 2nd lab. scale growth study, published papers on Columbia basinwide presence of minijacks and 1st lab. scale growth study in TAFS.
2004 Monitored wild and hatchery Yakima Chinook, initiated 1st production scale and 2nd lab scale growth experiment at CESRF, Published minijack assesment paper in TAFS, prepared paper for TAFS on 1st lab. scale growth study (see '02).
2003 Monitored age-2 male maturation and physiology in wild and hatchery Yakima R. Chinook and completed a growth modulation experiment (see '02) to control precocoius male maturation and improve smolt quality according to APRE hatchery reform guidlines.
2002 Monitored age-2 male maturation in wild and hatchery Yakima R. Chinook and intiated a growth modulation experiment to control precocoius male maturation and improve smolt quality according to APRE hatchery reform guidlines.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 199305600 Demonstration of Captive Salmo Research conducted under the ongoing project #200203100, Growth modulation in salmon supplementation, has integrated and expanded on physiological principals and diagnostic tools developed by BPA Project # 199305600 (Research on captive broodstock research on Pacific salmon, formerly Assessment of captive broodstock technology) and applied them at a hatchery production scale.
BPA 199506325 YKFP - Monitoring And Evaluati This project is integrally related to the monitoring and evaluation of hatchery rearing regimes used at the Yakima Supplementation hatchery including comparisons of wild and hatchery fish in river, at the hatchery and during downstream smolt migration through dams examining physiology, demographics, and life-history parameters.
BPA 199506424 WDFW/YKFP Supp Monitor Activit This project is integrally related to the monitoring and evaluation of hatchery rearing regimes used at the Yakima Supplementation hatchery including comparisons of wild and hatchery fish in river, at the hatchery and during downstream smolt migration through dams examining physiology, demographics, and life-history parameters.
BPA 199701325 Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Pro This project is integrally related to the monitoring and evaluation of hatchery rearing regimes used at the Yakima Supplementation hatchery including comparisons of wild and hatchery fish in river, at the hatchery and during downstream smolt migration through dams examining physiology, demographics, and life-history parameters.
BPA 199800702 Gd Ronde Supp Lostine O&M/M&E This project will be assessing NE Oregon Supplementation programs for compliance with APRE guidelines for hatchery reform in Chinook salmon stocks
BPA 199800703 Grande Ronde Supp. O&M/M&E This project will be assessing NE Oregon Supplementation programs for compliance with APRE guidelines for hatchery reform in Chinook salmon stocks
BPA 199800704 Grande Ronde Sp Chinook-Odf&W This project will be assessing NE Oregon Supplementation programs for compliance with APRE guidelines for hatchery reform in Chinook salmon stocks
BPA 200204700 Artificial Production Review This project will be assessing supplementation and production programs throughout the Columbia and Snake River basins for compliance with APRE hatchery reform guidelines related to physiology, demographics, and life-history

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery Compare rates of precocious male maturation and gender ratios of migrating wild and hatchery Yakima River spring Chinook salmon. Yakima Subbasin Plan App. J Objective 1.k and 1.p Task: Yakima hatchery/wild studies etc., Subbasin Supp. Table 8, also see basinwide documents: APRE, BiOp, UPA, NWPCC regarding hatchery reform (see proposal for specific details) J6-10, Supp.26
Growth Modulation Experiment Conduct a laboratory scale growth modulation experiment to reduce rates of precocious male maturation and improve SAR in CESRF spring Chinook. Yakima Subbasin Plan App. J Objective 1.k and 1.p Task: Yakima hatchery/wild studies etc., Subbasin Supp. Table 8, also see basinwide documents: APRE, BiOp, UPA, NWPCC regarding hatchery reform (see proposal for specific details) 6-10, Supp.26
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment Monitor precocious male maturation rates in ongoing and new production scale growth modulation experiments at Cle Elum Supplementation Hatchery for compliance with APRE hatchery reform guidlines. Yakima Subbasin Plan App. J Objective 1.k and 1.p Task: Yakima hatchery/wild studies etc., Subbasin Supp. Table 8, also see basinwide documents: APRE, BiOp, UPA, NWPCC regarding hatchery reform (see proposal for specific details) J6-10, Supp.26
Systemwide APRE monitoring Estimate rates of age-2 precocious male maturation at spring Chinook salmon supplementation and production hatcheries throughout the Columbia and Snake River basins None Artificial Production Review and Evaluation (APRE) final basin-level report (Document 2004-17, 30 November 2004) plus many other (BioP, UPA, NWPCC) systemwide documents (see proposal) regarding hatchery reform stratagies. A1 pg58-60

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
01: Manage and Administer Projects Project planning and coordination 1.Coordinate sample collections with tribal, state, federal biologists at hatchery facilities. 2.Coordinate sample collections with tribal biologists at Yakima River dams 3.Coordinate sample analysis with UW laboratory subcontractors 4.Coordinate production growth modulation experiment with CESRF personnel 5.Gamete collection for Growth modulation experiment 6/1/2007 5/31/2010 $27,100
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Growth Modulation Experiment
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Systemwide APRE monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

02: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Environmental Compliance Complete environmental compliance requirements related to ESA, ODFW, WDFW each year for fish collections. 6/1/2007 6/15/2009 $6,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Growth Modulation Experiment
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Systemwide APRE monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

03: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Monitor precocious male maturation rates in ongoing and new production scale growth modulation experiments at CESRF. H0: Growth modulation has no effect on the incidence of age-1 and age-2 precocious male maturation in CESRF spring Chinook salmon. Production Growth Modulation Experiments at CESRF: In an effort to reduce the number of precociously maturing male fish in the hatchery population, the Yakima Fisheries Program initiated a production scale growth modulation experiment, brood years 2002-2005 (released in 2004-2007). The experiment was designed using best available data from this Growth Modulation project (Larsen et al. in press-see attached). In brief, half of the fish in the program are reared according to standard hatchery methods with regard to ration and growth rate. The other half of the population is reared on a reduced ration during the autumn maturation initiation period, one year prior to release (described in Larsen et al. 2005). The first three years of this hatchery production experiment have been monitored through this project. With this renewal we will monitor the final release year of that experiment (2007) and begin monitoring the next series of growth modulation experiments proposed at CESRF. Starting with brood year 2006 fish, the Yakima Fisheries Program will initiate a new 4-5 year production scale experiment that will study the effects of alterations in fry emergence timing and time of smolt release on precocious male maturation rates and SAR (David Fast, Yakama Nation, personal communication); once again using results obtained through this Growth Modulation project to design the production-scale experiment (Larsen et al. unpublished). Our roles in these production scale experiments include: assisting with experimental design, monitoring size, gender, and male maturation status of experimental groups, as well as reporting results through BPA reports and peer reviewed papers and regional and national meetings. Methods In mid-March of each year, during the programs routine pre-release pathology screening (in cooperation with Ray Brunson, USFWS Pathologist, Olympia WA Fish Health Center), we sample 1,080 fish (60 fish/raceway X 6 raceways X 3 acclimation sites, Total # fish = 1080 fish/year or approximately 540 male fish analyzed/year). Each fish is individually anesthetized and sampled for length, weight, gender, visual assessment of maturational state (immature, age-1 precocious male, age-2 precocious male), gonad weight for calculation of gonadasomatic index (GSI) and blood samples for measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone levels (Cuisset et al. 1994). These data will be used to estimate age-1 and age-2 precocious male maturation rates in the CESRF population according to the method of Larsen et al. (2004). Differences in male maturation rates between treatments and acclimation sites will be determined by ANOVA. Data will be presented in contract reports, peer reviewed publications and reported annually at the Yakima Basin Science and Management Conference, Ellensburg, WA and at regional or national American Fisheries Society meetings and used for making programmatic decisions regarding hatchery rearing strategies at CESRF and other supplementation facilities. The expectation from Objective 1 is that fish reared under modified growth regimes will have lower rates of age-2 precocious male maturation compared with conventionally reared fish that historically have had precocious male maturation rates of approximately 50% (Larsen et al. 2004). A first concern of these growth modulation studies is that by reducing the size of smolts survival rates during outmigration will be reduced (Martin and Wertheimer 1989; Virtanen et al. 1991; Ward and Slaney 1988; Ward et al. 1989; Henderson and Cass 1991). Juvenile and adult survival data from the differentially tagged treatment groups will ultimately be used to determine which rearing protocols provide the best benefit to the supplemented stock. A second concern of this objective is that the new growth modulation experiments being proposed for the CESRF stock starting with BY 2006 fish, employing altered fry emergence timing, may result in unnaturally high rates of age-1 precocious male maturation, but this research will be well positioned to monitor these potential effects and further modify rearing strategies. 3/15/2007 5/31/2010 $164,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Primary R, M, and E Type: Survey 1080 Yak. fish for precocious mat./year

04: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Compare rates of precocious male maturation and gender ratios of migrating wild and hatchery Yakima River spring Chinook salmon. H01: Migrating wild and hatchery Yakima River spring Chinook salmon do not differ with regard to gender ratio and rate of precocious male maturation. H02: Migrating hatchery spring Chinook reared under a conventional or modified rearing and release strategy will not differ with regard to gender ratio and rate of precocious male maturation. Hatchery reform strategies like those being tested at CESRF require thorough monitoring and evaluation. An important aspect of this monitoring is comparing demographic and life-history parameters between wild and hatchery fish. The purpose of objective 2 is to compare gender ratios and precocious male maturation rates of wild and hatchery Yakima River spring Chinook salmon. As outlined in Objective 1, these data can be collected from hatchery fish prior to release. Collecting the same data from the associated wild salmon population is challenging, especially in a large system like the Yakima River. The Chandler smolt by-pass facility at Prosser Dam, in the lower Yakima River, provides the best venue for selectively collecting both hatchery and wild fish during the spring smolt migration. Since the hatchery treatment groups noted in Objective 1 are differentially marked with visible elastomer eye tags, additional comparisons of those groups are obtainable as well. As noted in Part B and E of this proposal, a portion of the precociously maturing males in the Yakima and other hatchery populations migrate significant distances downstream in the spring (Larsen et al. 2004, 2005; Beckman and Larsen 2005). Gender and maturation data obtained from the hatchery population before release (Objective 1) can be coupled with data from these same treatment groups during out-migration to estimate the proportion of age-2 precocious males that remain in the headwaters versus those that migrate downstream to the Columbia River and beyond. Furthermore, these collections allow one to make direct comparisons between hatchery and wild fish with regard to size, gender ratio and precocious male maturation rates as well. Perhaps most important, Objective 2 is the continuation of a unique body of comparative data for wild and hatchery supplemented fish that has been collected since 2003 and provides insights in to the variability in these metrics over a range of population densities and hydrologic and climatic conditions. Methods Wild and hatchery fish will be collected on approximately 4 select dates from mid-April to mid-May of each year coinciding with peaks in hatchery and wild fish smoltification migration patterns (Figure 7 see proposal). All CESRF hatchery fish can be sorted at Prosser Dam by adipose fin clip and visible elastomer eye tag into growth modulation treatment groups (one treatment is tagged on the right eye and the other on the left). Wild fish are not clipped or tagged. Fish #'s Wild Fish 200 fish/date X 4 = 800 Hatchery Conventional Treatment 200 fish/date X 4 = 800 Hatchery Modified Treatment 200 fish/date X 4 = 800 Total =2400 fish/year Previous monitoring has also suggested the need to collect fish over multiple dates in the spring in order gather a representative census of each of the populations (wild and hatchery treatments). The relatively large number of fish sampled in this ongoing study has been dictated by a power analysis showing that at least 200 fish are required on each sampling date to detect a statistically significant difference between a gender ratio of 60:40 and the expected ratio of 50:50 with a conventionally accepted power of 0.8 (Zar 1984). Individual fish will be sacrificed for determination of length, weight, gonadal development and gonad weight (for determination of precocious maturation based on gonadosomatic index (GSI)). Data collected from 2003-2005 (Larsen et al. 2005) demonstrated that the best method for determining precocious male development in migrating fish was GSI rather than measurement of 11-KT (which is used for determination in fish at the hatchery prior to release-see Objective 1). Gender ratios will be analyzed by Chi squared test (Zar 1984). Data will be presented in contract reports, peer reviewed publications and reported annually at the Yakima Basin Science and Management Conference, Ellensburg, WA and at regional or national American Fisheries Society meetings and used for making programmatic decisions regarding hatchery rearing strategies at CESRF and other supplementation facilities. The expectation from Objective 2 is that naturally rearing Yakima spring Chinook salmon will differ from the conventionally reared hatchery Chinook. Wild fish will have gender rations approximating 50:50 while those of the conventionally reared hatchery stock will favor females. Furthermore, the wild population will have lower rates of age-2 precocious male maturation than the conventional hatchery treatment, but similar rates to the modified hatchery treatment. 4/1/2008 5/31/2010 $88,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Primary R, M, and E Type: survey 2400 hatchery/wild fish per year

05: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Conduct a laboratory scale growth modulation experiment to reduce rates of precocious male maturation and improve SAR in CESRF spring Chinook. H01: The rate of age-1 and age-2 male maturation and smolt quality will not differ between Yakima River spring Chinook salmon reared under either a modified (earlier emergence time and reduced autumn growth) or conventional hatchery growth regime. The purpose of objective 3 is to conduct the third in a series (see Part E, Finding #3 and #5 above) of laboratory scale growth modulation experiments. This experiment will combine information from our two previous laboratory based studies in an effort to further reduce age-2 male maturation, increase smolt release size (and potentially SAR) and monitor the rate of age-1 male maturation in treated fish. As reviewed previously, reduced growth during the "maturation initiation period" will reduce the rate of age-2 maturation. However, lower growth carries with it the negative consequences of small fish size for tagging and reduced smolt size at release. In an effort to increase the size of fish without increasing growth rate in the autumn we propose to increase incubation temperatures of the eggs, to accelerate fry emergence timing. This will allow for significant growth to occur prior to autumn. In the autumn period, growth will be reduced through ration manipulation and then increased again in the following spring to provide maximum growth at the time of smoltification. High growth rate during smoltification has been correlated in our earlier research with improved smolt quality, downstream migration rate, and SAR in spring Chinook salmon (Beckman et al. 1998, 1999; Dickhoff et al. 1995, 1997). Methods Gametes will be acquired from the CESRF in September of 2007 during the middle of the spawning period. Arrangements have been made with Charles Strom (CESRF manager) to collect eggs and milt from 5 age-4 females and males, respectively, for a total of approximately 15,000 eggs (3000 eggs/female). One-to-one crosses will be conducted and eggs will be incubated in isolation (pending pathology screening for bacterial kidney disease) at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center research hatchery, Seattle, WA. Incubation temperature will be adjusted to induce emergence in one half of the eggs on 15 February and the other half 15 April, 2008. Fish will be ponded following emergence in quadruplicate 1.4 m diameter circular tanks in one of 4 treatments (Figure 8 see proposal). Fish Numbers: 600/tank X 4 replicates X 4 Treatments = 9600 fish Ration manipulation will be used to modulate growth rate to achieve target sizes of 15 or 10 grams by mid-October of the first Autumn. Fish will be fed commercial Bio-Oregon salmon feed. Computer software currently in use at the hatchery for production ration calculations will be used to calculate feed rates depending on target size and water temperature. In feed restriction experiments such as this, dominance/subordinate behavioral interactions can occur, resulting in an undesirable bi-modal size distribution. To alleviate this, feed restriction will be imposed by limiting the number of days a treatment group is fed each week rather than the amount of food each day. This technique allows for more equal distribution of food among all fish regardless of their position in the dominance hierarchy. Approximately monthly, batch weights of 50 fish will be conducted in quadruplicate and used to determine size and growth rate for adjusting ration. In September 2008 250 fish will be sacrificed to determine proportion of age-1 maturing males. Fish will be sampled for gender, length, weight, plasma 11-KT (Cuisset et al. 1994), and gonads weighed to determine GSI. In spring (Feb-May 2008) 6 fish per replicate (24 fish per treatment) will be sampled approximately every 2 weeks to characterize smolt physiology. Parameters measured will include gender, length, weight, condition factor, and gill Na+/K+-ATPase enzyme activity (McCormick, 1993). Finally, in summer 2008 all remaining fish (approximately 300) will be sacrificed and sampled for gender and males will be sampled for GSI to determine proportion of age-2 precocious maturation. The data from objective 3 will be analyzed by ANOVA comparing physiological parameters and incidence of precocious male maturation among different treatments. Data will be presented in contract reports, peer reviewed publications and reported annually at the Yakima Basin Science and Management Conference, Ellensburg, WA and at regional or national American Fisheries Society meetings and used for making programmatic decisions regarding hatchery rearing strategies at CESRF and other supplementation facilities. The expectations from this objective are that early pond / high growth fish will have a relatively low age-2 maturation rate and moderate age-1 maturation rate but larger size and better smolt development relative to the other treatments. The early pond / low growth will have low age-1 and age-2 maturation rates, but smaller size at smolting. The late pond / low growth treatment will have low age-1 and -2 male maturation rates, but small size. Finally, the late pond / high growth fish (similar to CESRF conventional fish) will have high age-2 maturation rates, low age-1 maturation rates and larger smolt size. 9/15/2007 5/31/2010 $509,072
Biological Objectives Metrics
Growth Modulation Experiment
Primary R, M, and E Type: Rear 9600 Yak Chinook to age-2 for mat. study

06: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Estimate rates of age-2 precocious male maturation at spring Chinook salmon supplementation and production hatcheries throughout the Columbia and Snake River basins H01: The rate of age-1 and age-2 male maturation will not differ between hatchery stocks throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins H02: The rate of age-1 and age-2 male maturation will not differ between conventional and supplementation hatchery stocks throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. By monitoring migration patterns of PIT-tagged Chinook salmon in the Columbia and Snake River hydro-systems, we have provided compelling evidence that significant rates of age-2 precocious male maturation are ubiquitous among hatchery stocks (Beckman and Larsen 2005). Further, preliminary screening for age-2 precocious male maturation at Leavenworth, Entiat and Winthrop National Fish hatcheries in spring 2005 that revealed early male maturation rates ranging from 5 to 19% of males provided further evidence in support of the basin wide significance of these findings. Over the next three years the aim of objective 4 is to better quantify precocious male maturation rates at a series of conventional (C) (Leavenworth-C, Entiat-C, Winthrop-C) and supplementation (S) (Yakima-S, Imnaha-S, Lostine-S, Winthrop-S) hatcheries throughout the Columbia and Snake River systems. Methods We will sample 300 smolts pre-release (March – April) from conventional hatcheries and supplementation programs in the Columbia and Snake River basins to assess the rate of early male maturation and compare early male maturation rates between conventional and supplementation hatchery programs. Sites include Cle Elum (supplementation (S)), Leavenworth (conventional (C)), Entiat (C), Winthrop (C and S), Imnaha (S), Lostine (S). Permission for sampling at each of these facilities has been secured from program biologists and hatchery managers (Yakima CESRF-Dave Fast, YN Fisheries; Leavenworth, Entiat, Winthrop - Steve Croci Deputy Complex Manager Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery Complex, Imnaha, Lostine - Tim Hoffnagle, Biologist, NE Oregon Supplementation Program). Fish will be sampled for length, weight, gender, plasma 11-KT, gonad weight for GSI determination. Estimates of age-2 male maturation will be correlated with PIT-tag observations (in programs with at least 7,500 PIT-tags) at adult return ladders according to the method of Beckman and Larsen (2005). Data will be statistically analyzed by regression analysis and ANOVA comparing precocious male maturation rates at different hatcheries and in supplementation versus conventional facilities (Zar, 1984). The expectations from objective 4 is that precocious male maturation will be quantified in numerous production and supplementation programs for the first time and as observed in the CESRF, rates of precocious male maturation will be higher in the newer supplementation programs that utilize localized broodstock compared to more domesticated stocks. The ultimate goals of objective 4 are to increase our understanding of the prevalence of precocious male maturation throughout the basin, develop a predictive tool in the PIT-tag data base to highlight the highest rates of precocious male maturation and use this information to target hatchery reform strategies like those developed through this project at facilities that are operating outside APRE guidelines with regard to life-history composition. 4/1/2007 5/31/2010 $242,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Systemwide APRE monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

07: Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Prepare Pisces reports annually Prepare Pisces reports annually 6/1/2007 5/31/2010 $1,500
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Growth Modulation Experiment
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Systemwide APRE monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

08: Produce Annual Report Produce annual report Produce report each year detailing research, monitoring and evaluation results. 8/1/2007 8/1/2010 $17,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Growth Modulation Experiment
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Systemwide APRE monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

09: Outreach and Education Scientific outreach Travel costs for two principal investigators to present scientific and management findings from this project at one annual regional and one annual National American Fisheries Society Meeting. Travel cost for 4 project researchers to attend the annual Yakima Basin Science and Management conference to present findings related to this project, travel cost for 2 project biologists to attend the NW Fish Culture Conference to present project findings and provide recommendations to regional hatchery personnel and managers. 6/1/2007 5/31/2010 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Growth Modulation Experiment
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Systemwide APRE monitoring
* # of general public reached: Approx. 300 regional and 400 National Biologists

10: Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Write peer reviewed publications on results from this project Write peer reviewed publications: 1) comparing rates of precocious male maturation in wild and hatchery Yakima Spring Chinook salmon 2) comparing rates of male maturation in conventional vs. supplemented hatchery spring Chinook salmon stocks 3) Laboratory scale growth modulation experiment 6/1/2008 5/31/2010 $37,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare Wild vs. Hatchery
Growth Modulation Experiment
Monitor Yak. Prod. Experiment
Systemwide APRE monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel NOAA and University of Washington $177,748 $186,791 $196,751
Fringe Benefits NOAA and University of Washington $46,299 $48,643 $51,242
Supplies Field, laboratory, fish culture supplies $18,878 $20,213 $21,963
Travel Field sampling, GSA vehicle, planning, coordination and public outreach $21,574 $22,139 $22,363
Overhead NOAA and University of Washington $90,879 $95,815 $100,374
Totals $355,378 $373,601 $392,693

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$1,121,672
Total Work Element budget$1,121,672

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$412,000 $418,000 Monitor hatchery production experiment and wild and hatchery fish in Yakima River, Monitor other supplementation programs for compliance with APRE hatchery reform guidelines, prepare peer reviewed publications to communicate management recommendations
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
 
Termination Date Comments
Unknown Termination of this project is possible when adequate information is available regarding the scope of this biological phenomenon at the basinwide level, the impacts of these changes in demographics, life-history composition and ecology to affected populations, and when adequate hatchery reform stratagies have been developed to control for them. In the first 4 years of this project great gains were made in recognizing the presence and causes of high rates of precocious male maturation. The future work proposed here will make even more significant strides towards increasing the awarness of this under-appreciated, but important issue to all stakeholders and improve our understanding of methods to mitigate for its impacts.
 
Final Deliverables
1) Final BPA report on the use of Growth Modulation to regulate life-history, smolt quality, and SAR of supplemented stocks. 2) Peer reviewed publications on use of emergence timing and growth rate to regulate age-1 and age-2 maturation in spring Chinook salmon. 3) Peer reviewed publication comparing precocoius male maturation in wild and hatchery spring Chinook salmon. 4) Peer review publication comparing rates of precocious male maturation in conventional (domesticated) and supplemented Columbia and Snake River basin Chinook populations. 5) Peer reviewed publication reviewing the use of growth modulation to regulate life-history, smolt quality, and SAR of supplemented stocks.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
Location:
Province: Columbia Plateau
Subbasin: Yakima
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments:


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$353,850
FY 2008 Budget
$353,850
FY 2009 Budget
$353,850
Total NPCC Rec
$1,061,550
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:Basinwide
Recommendation:Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$353,850
FY 2008 Budget
$353,850
FY 2009 Budget
$353,850
Total NPCC Rec
$1,061,550
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$353,850
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$353,850
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$353,850
Total MSRT Rec
$1,061,550
Budget Category:Basinwide
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: Due to the limited funding environment, the MSRT recommends sequencing the work within this project to meet FY 2006 funding levels (plus 5% for increased costs) for the next three years.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: This is an excellent proposal, but this project may be nearing the point of toning down the actual collection of more research data and instead developing recommendations for protocol development and implementation of existing findings. Along these lines, the work element to look at rearing practices should be emphasized.

The results of this study have broad applicability.

Technical and scientific background: The technical and scientific background for this proposal is outstanding. It gives the reader an excellent basis to understand the rest of the proposal -- not only what is proposed, but why as well.

Rationale and significance to subbasin plans and regional programs: This proposal is clearly associated with reforms to artificial production in the basin, as evidenced by this quote: "Now, the focus is on reducing or eliminating deleterious effects of hatcheries on naturally rearing fish and redesigning and adjusting hatchery programs to rear fish that are qualitatively and qualitatively similar to wild fish, not to simply rear more fish in hatcheries."

Relationships to other projects: The proposal provides excellent detail in regards to specific projects, particularly to hatchery-rearing practices throughout the basin.

Project history: The proposal includes an excellent summary of the project history over the past five years, including listing important findings with excellent and informative figures. This is an interesting project at both the academic and practical levels.

Objectives: Although the specific objectives are well defined by tasks, an overarching objective of improving our understanding of the influences of artificial culture on the life history trajectories of salmon would be appropriate.

Tasks (work elements) and methods: Methods are extremely well explained, including nice conceptual diagrams.

Monitoring and evaluation: Evaluation has been provided in the past, and will likely continue in the future, to provide important insights into altering artificial production to make it compatible with populations of natural salmon.

Facilities, equipment, and personnel: Facilities have already been shown to be more than adequate.

Information transfer: Publication record is excellent, that is likely best outlet, although direct input into other programs would be good.

Benefits to focal and non-focal species: The project should provide benefits to both natural and hatchery populations of the focal species. There should be no adverse effect beyond interactions during data collections.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: This is an excellent proposal, but this project may be nearing the point of toning down the actual collection of more research data and instead developing recommendations for protocol development and implementation of existing findings. Along these lines, the work element to look at rearing practices should be emphasized.

The results of this study have broad applicability.

Technical and scientific background: The technical and scientific background for this proposal is outstanding. It gives the reader an excellent basis to understand the rest of the proposal -- not only what is proposed, but why as well.

Rationale and significance to subbasin plans and regional programs: This proposal is clearly associated with reforms to artificial production in the basin, as evidenced by this quote:

"Now, the focus is on reducing or eliminating deleterious effects of hatcheries on naturally rearing fish and redesigning and adjusting hatchery programs to rear fish that are qualitatively and qualitatively similar to wild fish, not to simply rear more fish in hatcheries."

Relationships to other projects: The proposal provides excellent detail in regards to specific projects, particularly to hatchery-rearing practices throughout the basin.

Project history: The proposal includes an excellent summary of the project history over the past five years, including listing important findings with excellent and informative figures. This is an interesting project at both the academic and practical levels.

Objectives: Although the specific objectives are well defined by tasks, an overarching objective of improving our understanding of the influences of artificial culture on the life history trajectories of salmon would be appropriate.

Tasks (work elements) and methods: Methods are extremely well explained, including nice conceptual diagrams.

Monitoring and evaluation: Evaluation has been provided in the past, and will likely continue in the future, to provide important insights into altering artificial production to make it compatible with populations of natural salmon.

Facilities, equipment, and personnel: Facilities have already been shown to be more than adequate.

Information transfer: Publication record is excellent, that is likely best outlet, although direct input into other programs would be good.

Benefits to focal and non-focal species: The project should provide benefits to both natural and hatchery populations of the focal species. There should be no adverse effect beyond interactions during data collections.

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