FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 200003100: North Fork John Day Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Todd Shaw

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 200003100
Proposal Name: North Fork John Day Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project
BPA Project Manager: John Baugher
Agency, Institution or Organization: Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
Short Description: Increase habitat for Chinook salmon and steelhead on private and public-owned lands via implementing fencing, off-stream water development, revegetation, culvert replacement, pool development, mine tailing removal and large wood placement projects.
Information Transfer: The project leader holds a seat, dedicated to the CTUIR, on the North Fork John Day Watershed Council (NFJDWC). Local stakeholders will be made aware of various project activities through this coordinating body. The watershed council has proven to be very effective in promoting awareness and public participation for past project efforts. The project shall continue to conduct local outreach efforts (public meetings, tours and presentations) at the community level to demonstrate accomplishments, provide educational opportunities, and solicit additional landowner and resource agency participation and input. Project reports, containing project accomplishments, will continue to be produced quarterly and annually. Annual reports will be uploaded to BPA's website for public access. Annual stream temperature data collected as part of habitat enhancement effectiveness monitoring will be shared and stored on NOAA Fisheries access database. A CTUIR web site is currently under development which will provide periodic updates of implementation efforts and project effectiveness.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Todd Shaw Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Old Mission Highway P.O. Box 638
Pendleton OR 97801
Ph: 541.966.2373
Fax: 541.276.4348
Email: toddshaw@ctuir.com
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Todd Shaw Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Old Mission Highway P.O. Box 638
Pendleton OR 97801
Ph: 541.966.2373
Fax: 541.276.4348
Email: toddshaw@ctuir.com
Project Lead

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: John Day ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
45º09’N 118º50’W Camas Creek T5S, R32E, Section 4; Camas Creek at confluence with Cable Creek; approximately 3 miles northwest of Ukiah, OR, south of State Rt. 249; identified as Upper Camas Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; pool development project Umatilla, Oregon John Day No
45º04’N 118º59’W Camas Creek T6S, R31E, SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of Section 4; Camas Creek RM 5.3 at the confluence with Fivemile Creek; located immediately east of State Highway 395, south of Ukiah, Oregon, across the highway from Bridge Creek State Wilderness Area; identified as Lower Camas Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; pool development project Umatilla, Oregon John Day No
44º47’N 118º27’W Clear Creek T9S, R35E, SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 of Section 14; Clear Creek RM 4.3; approximately 1 mile upstream and southeast of Blackjack Mine; travel Forest Service Road 10 to Forest Road 13 to reach this site; identified as Grantite Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; fish passage improvement project (culvert replacement) Grant, Oregon John Day No
44º46’N 118º27’W Clear Creek/Beaver Creek T9S, R35E, Sections 10, 11, 14, 15, 24, 23; Clear Creek RM 3.4 to 4.1; approximately 4 miles southwest of Granite, OR on Forest Service Rd. 10; identified as Grantite Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; mine tailing removal, floodplain & stream channel restoration project Grant, Oregon John Day No
45º12'N 118º58’W Cooper Creek/Snipe Creek T4S, R31E, Sections 20, 21, 22, 27, 35; Cooper Creek RM 0 to 1.2, Snipe Creek approximately 1 mile upstream and downstream of the Cooper Creek confluence, approximately 2 to 5 miles north of Ukiah, OR adjacent to State Rt. 395; identified as Lower Camas Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; passive restoration (livestock exclusion fencing, off-stream water developments and revegetation) projects Umatilla, Oregon John Day No
44º59'-44º55’N 118º55’-118º50'W Desolation Creek T7S,R32E, SW 1/4 of Section 6, Sections 8, 17, 16, 20, 21, 28, 27, SE 1/4 Section 26; Desolation Creek RM 1.6 to 7.6; State Route 395 approximately 1 mile north of Dale, Oregon to National Forest Road 10; approximatey 3 miles east of Dale, Oregon; identified as Desolation Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; stream reach project involving in-stream wood placement and revegetation Grant, Oregon John Day No
44º50’N 118º32’W Granite Creek T8S, R35.5, Section 31; Granite Creek; identified as Grantite Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; fish passage improvement project (culvert replacement) Grant, John Day No
45º08’N 118º45’W Hidaway Creek T5S, R32E, Sections 1 and 2, R33E, Sections 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, 21; Hidaway Creek RM 0 to 5; approximately 5 miles east of Ukiah on State Rt. 249; identified as Upper Camas Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; in-stream wood placement, off-stream water developments and livestock exclusion fencing projects Umatilla, Oregon John Day No
44º48’N 118º37’W North Fork Desolation Creek T9S, R34E, NE 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 9; North Fork Desolation Creek RM 4.6; National Forest Road 34 south to Forest Road 400 to reach this site; approximately 1 mile southwest of Chrome Springs; identified as Desolation Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; fish passage improvement project (culvert replacement) Grant County, Oregon John Day No
44º47’N 118º37’W North Fork Desolation Creek T9S, R34E, NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 16; North Fork Desolation Creek RM 5.6; National Forest Road 34 south to Forest Road 400 to reach this site; approximately 2 miles northwest of Olive Lake; identified as Desolation Creek Geographic Area in John Day Subbasin Plan; fish passage improvement project (culvert replacement) Grant County, Oregon John Day No

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Steelhead Middle Columbia River ESU
Bull Trout
Interior Redband Trout
great blue heron; American beaver

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Planning: one 15-year easement; Secured $70,000 in cost share; Implementation - 9 acres cost shared with WHIP; 3 off-stream water developments; planted 6,000 trees
2004 Planning: one 15-year riparian easement; $45,000 cost share; Implementation - 41 acres enrolled into CREP; 103 acres and 2.7 miles of stream fenced; 5.6 miles riparian fence; 1 well; 6 water gaps; 3 off-stream water developments; planted 5,300 trees
2003 Planning: one 15-year riparian easement; Implementation - 120 acres and 2.6 miles of stream fenced; 3.6 miles riparian fence, 6 water gaps; 4 off-stream water developments; planted 2,500 trees
2002 Planning: - one 15-year riparian easement; Implementation - 54 acres and 1.4 miles of stream fenced; 2.24 miles riparian fence; one well re-activated; 5 water gaps; 3 off-stream water developments; planted 3,000 trees
2001 Planning - two 15-year riparian conservation easements; Implementation - 34.4 acres into CREP; 2.1 miles riparian fencing; 2 water gaps; 1 off-stream; water development; protected 0.8 stream miles
2000 Project Leader hired August 2000

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
Other: Natural Resources Conservation Service [no entry] [Related Project Title left blank] Annually secure Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program (WHIP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) cost share funds through this agency jointly with Umatilla and Grant County Farm Services Agencies (FSA).
BPA 198402100 John Day Habitat Enhancement - ODFW Complementary project; critical link to achieve overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals)
BPA 198710001 Umatilla Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement - CTUIR This project shares office space, materials and equipment. Daily interaction with project personnel assists with adaptive management decisions.
BPA 199303800 North Fork John Day River Enhancement - Umatilla National Forest Complementary project; critical link to achieve overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals)
BPA 199604601 Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat - CTUIR This project shares office space, materials and equipment. Daily interaction with project personnel assists with adaptive management decisions.
BPA 199605300 North Fork John Day Dredge-Tailings - Umatilla National Forest Partner with this project to be cost-effective and utilze comprehensive approaches; complementary project; critical link to achieve overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals)
BPA 199608300 Grand Ronde Watershed Restoration - CTUIR This project shares office space, materials and equipment. Daily interaction with project personnel assists with adaptive management decisions.
BPA 199801700 Gravel Push-Up Dam Removal Lower North Fork John Day - North Fork John Day Watershed Council Complementary project; critical link to achieve overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals)
BPA 199801800 John Day Watershed Restoration - Warm Springs Tribes Complementary project; critical link to achieve overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals)
PCSRF - CRITFC 2004-2-02 Clear Creek Floodplain Restoration - Umatilla National Forest Secured these funds and administer this project for the Umatilla National Forest; partnership with the Umatilla National Forest to restore spring Chinook and summer steelhead habitat degraded from mine tailings; complementary project; critical link to achieve overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals)

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Bring the stream channel in balance Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by bringing the stream channel in balance with the water and sediment as supplied by the watershed. This shall be accomplished by obtaining riparian conservation easements with private landowners. These cooperative agreements are essential in protecting funding investments, securing landowner commitments and ensuring adequate habitat recovery to address limiting factors on private properties within the Desolation, Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas. Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will further be increased by conducting outreach efforts (public meetings, tours, mailings and presentations) to obtain input, identify public concerns, provide educational opportunities, and promote stream habitat restoration and protection to assist in addressing limiting factors and coordination with resource agencies in obtaining necessary cost share funds and developing partnerships to address limiting factors in proposed project areas. John Day Strategies: G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 270-272;278-280
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by decreasing gradient and restoring sinuosity. This will be accomplished by implementation of in-stream projects, including mine tailing removal, pool developments, and engineered log jam projects, and riparian improvements, including construction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing and revegetation in all geographic areas. John Day Strategies: D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 260-266;270-280
Enhance base flows Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased from construction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing to exclude grazing from riparian and floodplain areas and development of upland livestock watering sites within the Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas. These improvements will better disperse livestock in upland areas, improving stream channel stability, width to depth ratios and native plant recovery, resulting in enhancement of base flows. John Day Strategies: E: Riparian Habitat Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 263-266;270-280
Enhance/restore/protect aspen Birds and ungulate species survival and productivity will increase from protection and recovery of aspen due to increased forage and habitat diversity within the Lower Camas Creek Geographic Area. John Day 2. Work with public land agencies to implement the recommended conservation & management practices; 3. Encourage organizations & entities who work with private landowners to implement recommended conservation & management practices. 308-309
Increase pool habitat Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by developing two pools within the Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas through construction of rock weirs and large woody debris (LWD)placement. Constructed holding pools will assist in recruiting spawning gravels to provide increased spawning opportunities for spring Chinook salmon and improve habitat complexity and cover for juvenile and adult salmonids. John Day Strategies: D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 260-266;270-280
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by placement of engineered log jams into 11 stream miles within the Desolation and Upper Camas Creek Geographic Areas. Log jams will assist in scouring holding pools and collecting spawning gravels to provide increased spawning opportunities, and improve habitat complexity and cover for juvenile and adult fish. John Day Strategies: D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 260-266;270-280
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by maintaining and improving quality and quantity of spawning grounds. This will be accomplished by removal of culverts impeding fish passage and replacement with culverts which will adequately pass fish to improve access to spawning areas; in-stream projects, including mine tailing removal, pool developments and engineered log jam placements to increase holding pools and available spawning gravels; riparian improvements, including construction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing and revegetation, to improve stream channel stability, width to depth ratios, and quality and quantity of spawning areas in all geographic areas. John Day Strategies: A: Improve Fish Passage, D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect High Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 252-54;270-280
Maintain riparian management objectives Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by obtaining riparian conservation easements with private landowners. These cooperative agreements are essential in protecting funding investments, securing landowner commitments and ensuring adequate habitat recovery to address limiting factors on private properties within the Desolation, Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas. John Day Strategies: G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 270-272;278-280
Minimize artificial fish passage barriers Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by removal of four culverts impeding fish passage and replacement with culverts which will adequately pass fish. These enhancements will improve access to 29.1 miles of spawning and rearing habitat within the Desolation and Granite Creek Geographic Areas. John Day Strategies: A: Improve Fish Passage, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 252-254;270-280
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by minimizing unnatural factors that lead to fluctuations in levels of dissolved oxygen. This will be accomplished from construction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing to exclude grazing from riparian and floodplain areas and development of upland livestock watering sites within the Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas. These improvements will better disperse livestock in upland areas, improving stream channel stability, width to depth ratios and native plant recovery, resulting in improved consistency in dissolved oxygen levels. John Day Strategies: E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 263-280
Moderate peak flows where appropriate Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased from construction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing to exclude grazing from riparian and floodplain areas and development of upland livestock watering sites within the Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas. These improvements will better disperse livestock in upland areas, improving stream channel stability, width to depth ratios and native plant recovery, resulting in moderation of peak flows. John Day Strategies: E: Riparian Habitat Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 263-266;270-280
Moderate temperatures through improvements Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by in-stream improvements including, engineered log jams, large woody debris placements (LWD), mine tailing removal and pool development projects, and riparian and upland improvements, including contruction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing and upland water developments and revegetation projects within all geographic areas. John Day Strategies: D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvements, I: Education/Outreach 260-266;270-280
Provide habitat components for focal species Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by obtaining riparian conservation easements with private landowners. These cooperative agreements are essential in protecting funding investments, securing landowner commitments and ensuring adequate habitat recovery to address limiting factors on private properties within the Desolation, Upper Camas and Lower Camas Creek Geographic Areas. Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will further be increased by conducting outreach efforts (public meetings, tours, mailings and presentations) to obtain input, identify public concerns, provide educational opportunities, and promote stream habitat restoration and protection to assist in addressing limiting factors and coordination with resource agencies in obtaining necessary cost share funds and developing partnerships to address limiting factors in proposed project areas. John Day Strategies: G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 270-272;278-280
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat Terrestrial mammal, bird and amphibian species survival and productivity will increase and fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by improved wetland functions including increased water retention capacity alleviating downstream flooding and soil erosion, streamflow maintenance, enhanced groundwater recharge, increased nutrient cycling within the Lower Camas Creek Geographic Area. John Day Strategy 2. Enhance degraded wetland habitat; Strategy 5. Work with federal agencies to target wetland conservation & development programs 304
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by removal of mine tailings from a 3,800-foot reach of Clear Creek, increasing habitat diversity, off-channel refugia, spawning and rearing areas, riparian vegetation and associated shade within the Granite Creek Geographic Area. John Day Strategies: A: Improve Fish Passage, D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 252-254;260-280
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by restoring off-channel areas for high flow refugia. This will be accomplished by constructing engineered log jams, mine tailing removal and pool development projects, and riparian improvements, including contruction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing and revegetation projects within all geographic areas. John Day Strategies: D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 260-266;270-280
Restore stream channel equilibrium Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by bringing vertical and lateral stream movement into balance with landscape and flow regimes. This will be accomplished by installing appropriate sized and designed culverts, removal of mine tailings, development of pools, placement of engineered log jams, construction of riparian livestock exclusion fencing and upland water developments and revegetation. John Day Strategies: A: Improve Fish Passage, D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, H: Upland Improvement Projects, I: Education/Outreach 252 - 280
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate Fish population and smolt-to-spawner ratios will be increased by trapping sediment on the floodplain to improve water quality and provide substrate for recovery of native plant communities in all geographic areas. This will be accomplished by placement of large woody debris and revegetation. John Day Strategies: A: Improve Fish Passage, D: In-stream Activities, E: Riparian Improvements, G: Protect Existing High Quality Habitat, I: Education/Outreach 252 - 280

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation. This involves acquiring all local, state and federal permits and clearances necessary to implement and maintain on-the-ground activities. The CTUIR will be consulting through BPA and coordinating with NRCS, Umatilla County SWCD, Monument SWCD, Grant County SWCD and the CTUIR Cultural Resource Protection Program in fulfilling all State, Local, and Federal permit requirements for proposed 2005 projects. Coordination with additional entities may be required as projects develop and opportunities arise. The Project shall complete and submit BPA Watershed NEPA Checklists to BPA’s Environmental Planning and Analysis Section for each project determined to have potential effects on cultural resources, water quality, or threatened or endangered species. Projects to be implemented shall potentially consist of fencing, off-stream and upland water developments, native vegetation plantings, passage improvements, large in-stream wood placements and mine tailing removals.Cultural and archeological surveys shall be conducted at sites, where habitat implementations will occur to determine if cultural resources are present and to insure their protection prior to project implementation. Any cultural resources, eligible for inclusion to the National Register of Historic Places, will be documented in reports. Reports of findings will be submitted to the State Historic Preservation Office (in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act) and to BPA’s Environmental Planning and Analysis Section. The Project shall complete and submit BPA CALENDAR YEAR 2007 and 2008 ACTUAL HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS forms and BPA CALENDAR YEAR 2007, 2008 and 2009 PROPOSED HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS forms to BPA’s Environmental Planning and Analysis Section. All identified noxious weed treatments shall be consistent with NOAA Fisheries’ 2003 Biological Opinion per BPA’s Habitat Improvement Program. 4/1/2007 3/31/2010 $50,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Maintain riparian management objectives
Minimize artificial fish passage barriers
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element

Develop Alternative Water Source Upland spring sites will be constructed to prevent livestock from watering from stream channels and better utilize upland forage. Approximately eight off-stream and upland spring sites will be developed, adjacent to new habitat project areas, to better disburse livestock and better utilize available forage in uplands, relieving concentrated grazing pressure and associated erosion problems in riparian and floodplain areas. Livestock watering troughs shall be purchased and installed at these sites. These sites shall be identified and mapped. This work element may also include well development and solar panel purchase and installation. Water developments will be implemented in combination with livestock exclusion projects on Camas Creek tributaries, Snipe, Cooper, and Hidaway Creeks. 5/15/2007 11/30/2009 $16,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Enhance base flows
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
No Metrics for this Work Element

Enhance Floodplain Construct engineered log jams to scour pools for recruiting spawning gravels, improve pool to riffle ratios, and assist in restoring floodplain function. Large wood additions will be implemented in lower Hidaway and lower Desolation Creeks to improve pool to riffle ratios, and assist in restoring floodplain function and enhancement. BPA project dollars will assist in covering tree and root wad purchase and installation subcontract costs. 5/15/2007 9/30/2009 $175,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of acres treated: 250 acres

Increase Instream Habitat Complexity Create pools to increase MCR ESU spring Chinook salmon spawning opportunities. Two pools shall be created in Camas Creek, one at the confluence of Cable Creek and another one at the confluence of Fivemile Creek. These pools will increase MCR ESU spring Chinook salmon spawning success. Construction of rock weirs and potential large woody debris placements will likely be included in the pool development designs. 5/15/2007 9/30/2009 $96,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of stream miles treated: 6 miles

Install Fence Install livestock exclusion fencing to restrict livestock from riparian corridors. Includes work to install riparian exclusion fence and gates. May also include water gaps for livestock. Project staff shall initiate invitations for fence construction bids, provide tour of proposed fence construction sites to interested contractors, award subcontracts to low-bid fence contractors, and develop fence construction subcontracts. 4/1/2007 2/28/2010 $85,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of miles of fence: 18

Plant Vegetation Native trees and shrubs will be planted within riparian areas. Specific plant species shall include willows, black cottonwood, wild rose, red alder, snowberry, red and black elderberry, choke cherry, redosier dogwood and black hawthorn. Approximately 8,000 Native trees and shrubs will be planted by project staff within Clear Creek riparian areas and lower Camas Creek tributary areas, including Snipe and Cooper Creeks riparian areas for purposes such as erosion control, roughness recruitment, shading, restoring native habitat and forage enhancement. These plants will originate from seeds and cuttings locally obtained by the project and grown out at the CTUIR Native Plant Nursery to provide cost savings. This Work Element shall include project staff collecting native willow cuttings on-site or from nearby drainages to sting into stream banks under operated equipment subcontracts. In-basin plant stocks shall be utilized because they are acclimated to the local climate, provide natural wildlife forage, are more resistant to the area’s potential disease and insect problems and reduce the risk of polluting existing plant community gene pools. 5/1/2007 11/15/2009 $10,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of acres of planted: 150
* # of riparian miles treated: 2

Remove Mine Tailings Remove mine tailings from the riparian corridor and re-contour the surrounding flood plain. The project will assist the Umatilla National Forest on U.S. Forest Service lands in Clear Creek to remove mine tailings from the riparian corridor and re-contour the surrounding flood plain. Clear Creek is the largest tributary to Granite Creek, an important spring Chinook salmon fishery. Dredge mining of Clear Creek during the 1930’s to 1950’s left a huge pile of river rock, approximately 150 feet wide and 10 feet high, for 3,800 feet adjacent to Clear Creek in the project area. The dredge piles constrict the former floodplain and dredging created a narrow, straight, high- energy channel unable to retain fine sediments, which resulted in 500 feet of Beaver Creek and 1000 feet of Clear Creek flowing subsurface during late summer months. These late-summer dry channel segments created fish passage barriers for spawning salmon migrating upstream over the decades following secession of dredge activities. The subsurface water flows under the dredge tailing piles forming a side channel on the other side of tailing piles. The water then flows down the side channel, for about 1500 feet, then back through tailings into Clear Creek, with no inlet or outlet for fish passage. The huge dredge tailing pile also cuts Clear Creek off from its floodplain, and for the most part has eliminated the riparian zone and its vegetation. Over the last 50 years the tailings have become very stable, and have experienced almost no vegetative recovery. Thirteen miles of similar work have been completed on the North Fork John Day River and its tributaries Granite and Clear Creeks downstream of the current project area between 1993 and 2002 (Ramsey, 2005). BPA funds will provide cost share for heavy equipment subcontracts, collection of native plant materials for propagation and shrub and tree propagation costs. 4/1/2007 9/30/2009 $96,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of acres treated: 84 acres
* Did the tailings create a fish passage barrier?: No

Maintain Vegetation Treat noxious weeds with herbicides; install mulching fabric, tree shelters and tubes around native trees and shrubs. The project shall treat noxious weeds with herbicides within existing project areas two to three times annually to decrease competition with native vegetation. BPA CALENDAR YEAR 2007, 2008 and 2009 PROPOSED HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS forms shall be submitted to BPA’s Environmental Planning and Analysis Section in December of each year (see Work Element-165) to insure consistency with NOAA Fisheries’ 2003 Biological Opinion per BPA’s Habitat Improvement Program. Treatment of noxious weeds is identified in all of CTUIR’s riparian easements as an annual CTUIR responsibility. Other activities under this Work Element shall include plant competition reduction (purchase and installation of mulching fabric around trees) and prevention or reduction of animal damage (purchase and installation of tree shelters and tubes). 3/1/2007 12/15/2009 $40,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
No Metrics for this Work Element

Install Fish Passage Structure Remove and replace culverts impeding fish passage to improve access to spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead spawning and rearing habitat. The project shall coordinate with the Umatilla National Forest and provide BPA cost chare funds to replace four individual culverts impeding fish passage on Forest Service lands. These culverts are located on Clear Creek (1), Granite Creek (1) and North Fork Desolation Creek (2). BPA dollars will assist in covering the costs of material purchases and heavy operated equipment subcontracts. 5/15/2007 9/30/2009 $50,943
Biological Objectives Metrics
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Minimize artificial fish passage barriers
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* Does the structure remove or replace a fish passage barrier?: Yes
* # of miles of habitat accessed: Access to 29 miles of salmon & steelhead habitat

Lease Land Develop and secure riparian easements with private landowners to protect BPA/CTUIR investments. This Work Element involves developing and securing riparian easements with private landowners to protect BPA/CTUIR investments. Landowner negotiations will include determining and agreeing upon riparian corridor widths, water development locations and numbers, etc., developing a scope of work, and deciding the number of years the easement shall cover (a minimum of 15 years and maximum length of perpetuity). Agreements will be developed which permit CTUIR restoration efforts and restrict certain land use activities, such as grazing, removal of vegetation, construction of buildings, etc. In lieu of landowners being provided direct funding to secure their participation, they shall accept the costs of all BPA-funded habitat improvements along with CTUIR’s maintenance of these improvements as consideration (with the exception of CREP cost shared projects, where they will recieve annual USDA subsidies). Easements shall be reviewed by CTUIR Attorneys. Easements shall be recorded at either the Umatilla County or Grant County Courthouse, attached to the property deed and binding upon heirs or successors in interest. 4/1/2007 3/31/2010 $20,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Maintain riparian management objectives
Minimize artificial fish passage barriers
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Provide habitat components for focal species
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of riparian miles protected: 9 stream miles

Coordination Develop and submit grant proposals to obtain cost share funds. Develop and submit grant proposals through the North Fork John Day Watershed Council and to various local, state and federal entities and via the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission. These cost share funds may be pursued during any month of the year and are used exclusively for on-the-ground project implementations. Such efforts effectively forge partnerships between the Tribes, resource agencies and the public, and allow BPA funds to go further. 4/1/2007 3/31/2010 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Maintain riparian management objectives
Minimize artificial fish passage barriers
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Provide habitat components for focal species
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
No Metrics for this Work Element

Identify and Select Projects Identify, prioritize, and select habitat enhancement areas Identify, prioritize, and select potential project sites through subbasin plan and watershed assessment review, public outreach, landowner coordination, interagency communication, and personal observation. 4/1/2007 3/31/2010 $20,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element

Manage and Administer Projects Produce project deliverables and accomplishment narratives. Project personnel shall prepare and submit draft statement of work packages, budgets, property inventories, spending plans, accural reports, BiOp metrics reports for applicable RPA's, deliverable and accomplishment narratives and miscellaneous other reports. 12/1/2007 2/28/2010 $35,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element

Outreach and Education Conduct outreach to obtain input, identify landowner and resource agency concerns, provide educational opportunities, and promote stream habitat restoration & protection. The project shall conduct outreach efforts (public meetings, tours, mailings and presentations) to obtain input, identify landowner and resource agency concerns, provide educational opportunities, and promote stream habitat restoration and protection; provide coordination between the project and participating landowners and various fish and wildlife personnel involved in project work. 4/1/2007 3/31/2010 $50,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Decrease gradient; restore sinuosity
Enhance base flows
Enhance/restore/protect aspen
Increase pool habitat
Increase role and abundance of large woody debris
Maintain & improve quality & quantity of spawning
Maintain riparian management objectives
Minimize artificial fish passage barriers
Minimize fuctuations of dissolved oxygen
Moderate peak flows where appropriate
Moderate temperatures through improvements
Provide habitat components for focal species
Restore and/or enhance wetland habitat
Restore channel and floodplain connectivity
Restore off-channel areas for high flow refugia
Restore stream channel equilibrium
Trap sediment on the floodplain as appropriate
* # of general public reached: Project goal is to reach 200 individuals.
* # of general public reached: 200

Provide Technical Review Coordinate with cost share partners to review implementation plans, designs and engineering specifications for partnered projects. Project staff shall coordinate with NRCS on combined BPA/CREP and BPA/WHIP projects to review individual NRCS Conservation Plans (planting, fencing & water development plans); project staff shall coordinate with BOR to review BPA/BOR design and engineering specifications for partnered in-stream and passage-related projects. 6/1/2007 9/30/2009 $15,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Annual Report Produce annual report for BPA. Project shall develop annual report of progress as per contract specifications between the CTUIR and BPA, which shall include details of accomplishments for work elements included within the Statement of Work, and submit to BPA. 4/1/2007 8/30/2009 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Status Report Produce quarterly reports to summarize status of project milestones. Project shall produce quarterly reports to summarize status of project milestones. Quarterly reports document project accomplishments, problems encountered, planned activities for the following quarter & purchases of non-expendable & sensitive items. 7/10/2007 1/10/2010 $10,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Collect pre-project data and monitor short and long-term effects of existing habitat enhancements to determine project successes. Project personnel shall collect pre and post project data to monitor enhancement effects of existing habitat projects. Data collected shall include longitudinal and cross-section surveys, percent shade,stream temperature, photo point monitoring, land-use and percent substrate 6/1/2007 3/31/2010 $18,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
Focal Area: Tributaries
Primary R, M, and E Type: Project Implementation/Compliance Monitoring
Primary R, M, and E Type: Collect data to determine project effectiveness

Submit/Acquire Data Share stream temperature data with others within and outside of the basin. The project shall continue to provide stream temperature data, collected within and downstream of existing enhancement areas (effectiveness monitoring), to the Monument SWCD for uploading to NOAA's access database; this database provides one point of storage and retrieval for North Fork John Day Basin stream temperature data. 5/15/2007 11/30/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Bring the stream channel in balance
Maintain riparian management objectives
Provide habitat components for focal species
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel 28 months of FTE's (Project Leader and Fisheries Technician salaries total 22 months; additional months cover administrative and cultural resource staff support) $116,500 $122,325 $128,441
Supplies Repairs; Field, Office, Construction Supplies, etc. $12,890 $13,535 $14,211
Travel Per diem; Vehicle Expense; Vehicle Insurance $11,479 $12,053 $12,656
Capital Equipment [blank] $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Overhead Overhead Rate @ 39% $71,023 $74,574 $78,303
Other Construction Subcontracts (fencing, operated equipment, etc.) $16,476 $17,300 $18,165
Personnel [blank] $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Fringe Benefits Fringe Rate @ 35.4% $41,241 $43,303 $45,468
Totals $269,609 $283,090 $297,244

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$849,943
Total Work Element budget$849,943

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
BIA training, travel, office and construction equipment purchases $3,333 $3,333 $3,333 Cash Under Development
BOR Provide engineering, cultural resource, ESA consultation, removal/fill permit application services $75,000 $75,000 $50,000 In-Kind Under Development
CTUIR salaries, fringe & associated overhead $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 Cash Confirmed
NF John Day Watershed Council providing mapping services, monitoring assistance; outreach $6,667 $6,667 $6,667 In-Kind Under Development
NOAA-Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund covers construction materials and implementation subcontracts $40,000 $40,000 $40,000 Cash Under Development
OWEB covers construction materials and implementation subcontracts $20,000 $20,000 $20,000 Cash Under Development
USDA-CREP covers construction materials and implementation subcontracts $75,000 $75,000 $50,000 In-Kind Under Development
USDA-Forest Service cost share on materials and subcontract costs for culvert replacements and mine tailing removal $40,000 $40,000 $20,000 Cash Under Development
USDA-WHIP covers construction materials and implementation subcontracts $50,000 $50,000 $100,000 Cash Under Development
Totals $320,000 $320,000 $300,000

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$312,106 $327,712 The project has conservatively anticipated inflation rates at 3% per year and adjusted the budget accordingly for out-years.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
The bulk of O&M costs, which this project incurs, are related to herbicide applications to address noxious weeds within existing project areas. These costs average $8,000 to $10,000 per year. The project utilized outside funds to maintain weeds in 2005. The project leader feels strongly that plant competition reduction (purchase and installation of mulching fabric around trees) and prevention or reduction of animal damage (purchase and installation of tree shelters and tubes) does not fit well under Work Element 22. Habitat/Passage O&M: Maintain Vegetation. Mulching fabric, tree shelters and tubes are generally placed around trees when they are initially planted and usually do not require replacement. Placing these items under WE 22 tends to over-inflate O&M costs for habitat projects.
 
Termination Date Comments
none This project is the only BPA funded project implementing habitat enhancements on private properties within the upper North Fork John Day Drainage. The CTUIR and partnering state and Federal agencies feel strongly that this project provides a critical link to achievement of the overall biological and habitat objectives indicated in the John Day Subbasin Plan (long-term target goals). Many miles of degraded habitat remain to be addressed within the upper basin along with protection of critical headwater sanctuaries on public lands.
 
Final Deliverables
This project provides annual reports to BPA, but does not anticipate project termination.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$200,000
FY 2008 Budget
$200,000
FY 2009 Budget
$200,000
Total NPCC Rec
$600,000
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: Budgetary restrictions keep us from funding this highly rated project. Another example of the capital to expense dilemma.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: Chinook Mid-Columbia ESU steelhead, Mid-Columbia ESU bull trout and interior redband trout should all realize long-term benefits from the habitat improvements proposed. This project is well planned, and the objectives and methods have been thought through. Clear ties are made to the Fish and Wildlife Program, the BPA Watershed Management Program, the BiOp RPAs, Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit, and the Subbasin Plan. There are many complementarities between this project and others in the subbasin, with clear descriptions of who does what, how they are related, and presentation of the role of CTUIR in the communities and watershed council.

This project proposes tributary habitat improvements in priority areas identified in the Subbasin Plan and tied to EDT results. Habitat limiting factors are linked with strategies and restoration activities. Detailed descriptions of habitat problems and activities to date are provided by geographic area. There is a clear description of project history and actions, but little evaluation of project outcomes and impacts. A table lays out the rationale for proposed actions. Objectives are specific to location, expressed in measurable units and relate actions to time lags for discerning measurable effects. Work elements are similarly specific, with milestones and dates. M&E will be done through collection of well-described, pre- and-post implementation data on channel hydrology and vegetative response. No direct monitoring of fish use of habitat. The sponsors should coordinate with ODFW so that fish monitoring occurs and can be tied to habitat improvements. Information transfer is accomplished through outreach and education activities, watershed council participation, landowner collaborations, and periodic reporting.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: Chinook Mid-Columbia ESU steelhead, Mid-Columbia ESU bull trout and interior redband trout should all realize long-term benefits from the habitat improvements proposed. This project is well planned, and the objectives and methods have been thought through. Clear ties are made to the Fish and Wildlife Program, the BPA Watershed Management Program, the BiOp RPAs, Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit, and the Subbasin Plan. There are many complementarities between this project and others in the subbasin, with clear descriptions of who does what, how they are related, and presentation of the role of CTUIR in the communities and watershed council.

This project proposes tributary habitat improvements in priority areas identified in the Subbasin Plan and tied to EDT results. Habitat limiting factors are linked with strategies and restoration activities. Detailed descriptions of habitat problems and activities to date are provided by geographic area. There is a clear description of project history and actions, but little evaluation of project outcomes and impacts. A table lays out the rationale for proposed actions. Objectives are specific to location, expressed in measurable units and relate actions to time lags for discerning measurable effects. Work elements are similarly specific, with milestones and dates. M&E will be done through collection of well-described, pre- and-post implementation data on channel hydrology and vegetative response. No direct monitoring of fish use of habitat. The sponsors should coordinate with ODFW so that fish monitoring occurs and can be tied to habitat improvements. Information transfer is accomplished through outreach and education activities, watershed council participation, landowner collaborations, and periodic reporting.

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