FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199606700: Manchester Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Project

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Desmond Maynard

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199606700
Proposal Name: Manchester Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Project
BPA Project Manager: Gregory Baesler
Agency, Institution or Organization: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Short Description: Smolt to adult seawater rearing of spring and summer chinook salmon broodstocks from Idaho's Salmon River and Oregon's Grande Ronde River sub-basins. Provides adult fish for spawning or direct release in recovery programs for ESA-listed stocks.
Information Transfer: The data is presented at bimonthly meetings of the Chinook Salmon Captive Propogation Techincal Oversight Committee and monthly interagency Technical Oversight Team meetings for the Oregon chinook captive broodstocks. Presentations at scientific meetings, peer discussions, and numerous tours at NMFS Manchester rearing facilities.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Desmond Maynard NOAA P.O. Box 130
Manchester, Washington, 98353
Ph: 360 871-8313
Fax: 206 842-8364
Email: des.maynard@noaa.gov
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Desmond Maynard NOAA P.O. Box 130
Manchester, Washington, 98353
Ph: 360 871-8313
Fax: 206 842-8364
Email: des.maynard@noaa.gov
Project Lead

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Mainstem/Systemwide ARG Province: Mainstem on the ground/Multiprovince
Sponsor Subbasin: Systemwide ARG Subbasin: Mainstem on the ground/Multiprovince
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
45.1272 -117.7016 Catherine Creek Catherine Creek Union, Oregon Grande Ronde Yes
45.1629 -118.3812 Grande Ronde River Grande Ronde River Union, Oregon Grande Ronde Yes
44.7191 -113.4056 Lemhi River Lemhi River Lemhi, Idaho Salmon Yes
45.3020 -117.3970 Lostine River Lostine River Wallowa, Oregon Grande Ronde Yes
44.3973 -114.8292 West Fork Yankee Fork West Fork Yankee Fork Custer, Idaho Salmon Yes
44.4421 -114.6104 Yankee Fork East Fork Yankee Fork Custer, Idaho Salmon Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Snake River Spring/Summer ESU

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 The project received BY 03 smolts from the Grande Ronde (n=710) and Salmon River (n=600) Basins, produced 353 maturing Grande Ronde and 471 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery activities, and installed pipeline for inceased seawater delivery.
2004 The project received BY 02 smolts from the Grande Ronde (n=716) and Salmon river (n=592) Basins and produced 463 maturing Grande Ronde and 256 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery efforts.
2003 The project received BY 01 smolts from the Grande Ronde (n=716) and Salmon River (n=542) Basins and produced 454 maturing Grande Ronde and 436 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery activities.
2002 The project received BY 00 smolts from the the Grande Ronde (705) and Salmon River (582) Basins, produced 354 maturing Grande Ronde and 539 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery, and demonstrated ultrasound enables early detection of maturation.
2001 The project received BY 99 smolts from the Grande Ronde (n=353) and Salmon River (n=630) Basins and produced 380 maturing Grande Ronde and 286 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery activities.
2000 The project received BY 98 smolts from Grande Ronde (n=485) and Salmon River (n=725) Basins and produced 348 maturing Grande Ronde and 151 Salmon River fish for use in recovery activities.
1999 The project received BY 97 smolts from Grand Ronde (n=486) and Salmon River (n=267) Basins and produced 264 maturing Grande Ronde and 77 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery activities.
1998 The project received BY 96 smolts from Grande Ronde (n=494) and Salmon River (n=175) Basins and produced 167 maturing Grand Ronde and 97 maturing Salmon River fish for use in recovery activities.
1997 The project completed infrastructure development, received BY 95 smolts from Grand Ronde (n=305) and Salmon River (n=69) Basins for marine culture, and provided 70 maturing Grand Ronde and 38 maturing Salmon River fish for use in ESA recovery activities.
1996 The project initiated construction of buildings, pumping system upgrades, water treatment upgrades, and effluent water ozone sterilization facilites required for the marine culture of ESA listed Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 198909803 Salmon Studies Id Rvrs SBT The Shoshone-Bannock tribes uses eggs derived from the joint IDFG-NOAA Salmon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Projects in an egg box program designed to recover Salmon River Chinook stocks listed under ESA.
BPA 199305600 Demonstration of Captive Salmo Refinement of captive broodstock technology is necessary to maximize potential of captive broodstock recovery programs for ESA-listed stocks of Pacific salmon in the Columbia River Basin.
BPA 199700100 Idaho Chinook Salmon Captive R The projects are inseparably bound together with IDFG's role being to provide freshwater rearing for presmolts, freshwater rearing for the final stages of maturation, and evaluating the efficacy of using adult releases as a tool for recovering ESA listed stocks. NOAA's role is to provides the seawater captive broodstock rearing that is crucial for these anadromous stocks during the several years of their life cycle when they would naturally be at sea.
BPA 199800703 Grande Ronde Supp. O&M/M&E The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla release the progeny of Manchester reared captive broodstock from acclimation sites in the Grande Ronde River Basin.
BPA 199801001 Grande Ronde Captive Brood O&M These projects are inseparably bound together with ODFW's role being to provide freshwater rearing for all presmolt stages, half the smolt to adult stage fish, all freshwater rearing for the final stages of maturation, spawning, incubation, offspring smolt production, and evaluating the efficacy of using smolt releases produced from captive broodstock parents as a tool for recovering ESA listed stocks. NOAA's role is to provide the seawater captive broodstock rearing that is crucial for these anadromous stocks during the several years of their life cycle when they would naturally be at sea.
BPA 199801006 Captive Broodstock Artificial The Nez Perce Tribe releases the progeny of the Manchester Reared Captive Broodstock from acclimation sites in the Grande Ronde Basin.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
2000 Biological Opinion ESA recovery The most important aspect of the Manchester Captive Broodstock Program is providing safety net captive broodstock rearing for chinook salmon populations as identified in the 2000 NMFS Biological Opinion. The Salmon River’s Lemhi, East Fork, and East Fork-Yankee Fork stocks that are reared to maturity in seawater at Manchester have been identified as a required action by RPA 175. The Oregon Grand Ronde stocks reared in the marine captive broodstock program at Manchester have been identified as a required action under RPA 176. The facility also can provide safety net rearing opportunities for ESA listed stock to be identified under RPA 178. The captive broodstock reared at Manchester provide for adult fish used to evaluate the reproductive success of hatchery fish compared to wild fish under RPA 182. None RPA 175, 176, 178, and 182 9-159,160,169
2004 Updated Biological Opinion ESA recovery Hatchery Actions (pg. 66) of the Updated Proposed Actions for the 2004 FCRPS Biological Opinion call for continued funding of the Grande Ronde River and Salmon River safety net programs for Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon. The 2004 FCRPS Biological Opinion (pg. 6-66) concurs with the above UPA and determined that the safety-net program for this ESU is effective at reducing the short-term risk of extinction. None Hatchery Actions 66 (UPA) and 6-66 (BiOP)
5.2.1 Fish production/population In the Grande Ronde Subbasin Plan's Supplement the future Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Objective is to reach 5,000-16,000 returning adults (pgs 32-35 of supplement). The Manchester Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Project provides a large number of the broodstock needed to meet this goal through artificial propagation. Grande Ronde Use strategic artificial propagation to achieve the goal in Table 5-3 of 5,000-16,000 returning spring/summer chinook salmon adults. 32-35
Aquatic Objective 2A "By 4th hydrologic unit, carry out focused activities designed to improve our understanding and definition of small populations, while protecting the genetic integrity of wild populations that are below historic levels". Along with its IDFG partners the project is applying safety net hatchery intervention through continuation of ongoing captive broodstock programs to meet interim abundance and delisting goals. These programs provide gene conservation measures needed to meet the Salmon Subbasin Plan's goal of preventing the irreversible loss of genetic diversity. Salmon 2A1: Preserve the genetic integrity of existing wild stocks...2A2: Continue ongoing and develop new programs in areas where intervention has already occurred...Support refinement...captive broodstock...2A5: Apply safety net hatchery intervention. 23 and 24
Aquatics Objective 1B Achieve goals defined in Table 6 (spring chinook) 119,000-128,000 long-term return, >36,400 natural spawning component, and 94,000 harvest component) for the Salmon Subbasin through application of artificial propagation program. Minimize short- and long-term genetic, ecological, and life history effects on wild populations. The Manchester Spring Chinook Salmon Project uses artificial propogation as a tool to help the Salmon Subbasin Management Plan meet these goals. Salmon Strategy 1B2: Implement additional artificial propagation programs to meet goals identified in Table 6 for anadromous salmonids...Strategy 1B3: Implement innovative propagation techniques to meet goals indentified in Table 6 for anadromous salmonids.. 21
Fish Production Goals The Manchester seawater rearing project plays a key role in the Grande Ronde sping/summer chinook salmon captive broodstock program (pgs 90-92) efforts to restore chinook salmon populations in the basin. In addition, the Manchester captive broodstock component plays a key role in the Subbasin's Fish Production Goal (3.23.4.2) for supplying native broodstock for the NE Oregon Hatchery conservation program (Table 37 pg 88) Grande Ronde Fish Production/Population Strategies 264 and 86-94

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Obtain environmental compliance Prepare and submit appropriate transfer permit applications for the States of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho for shipping of live eggs and fish. Coordinate with BPA staff to ensure complete NEPA/ESA clearance for BPA funded program activities. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $12,600
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Maintain Fish Health Pathology and diagnostic services Observable indices of fish health are checked daily by examining feeding response, external condition, and behavior of fish in each tank as initial indicators of developing problems. In particular, fish culturists observe for signs of lethargy, spiral swimming, side swimming, jumping, flashing, unusual respiratory activity, body surface abnormalities, and unusual coloration. Presence of any of these behaviors or conditions is reported to the fish health staff. Additionally, the presence of moribund fish is reported to fish health staff for blood and parasite sampling. A fish pathologist routinely monitors captive broodstock mortalities to determine cause of death. When a treatable pathogen is either detected or suspected, a veterinarian, in consultation with IDFG or ODFW fish health staff, prescribes appropriate prophylactic and therapeutic drugs to control the problem. Select mortalities are appropriately preserved for pathology, genetic, and other analyses. Specimens that are not vital to analysis are disposed of in a manner consistent with ESA permits. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $189,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
2000 Biological Opinion ESA recovery
2004 Updated Biological Opinion ESA recovery
5.2.1 Fish production/population
Aquatic Objective 2A
Aquatics Objective 1B
Fish Production Goals
No Metrics for this Work Element

Maintain Hatchery Maintain marine culture facilities This work encompasses a variety of grounds, building, and equipment maintenance activities required to ensure the Manchester Marine Research Station can provide a high quality salmon culture environment for these anadromous fish during the marine portion of their life cycle. It includes routine installation, service, and maintenance of chillers, generators, disinfection equipment, ozone generators, alarms, pumps, plumbing, electrical equipment, rearing vessels, fish culture equipment, buildings, and hatchery grounds. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $380,782
Biological Objectives Metrics
2000 Biological Opinion ESA recovery
2004 Updated Biological Opinion ESA recovery
5.2.1 Fish production/population
Aquatic Objective 2A
Aquatics Objective 1B
Fish Production Goals
No Metrics for this Work Element

Rear Fish Marine culture of Snake River Chinook Salmon NOAA Fisheries provides high quality seawater rearing for Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon at its Manchester Research Station on Washington's Puget Sound. The rearing process begins in May-June of each year when IDFG and ODFW each transfer about 750 smolting fish from their freshwater rearing facilities in Eagle, Idaho and Wallowa, Oregon to Manchester for seawater rearing. Upon arrival, these smolts are acclimated to seawater in 4.1-m diameter circular tanks in building 12. They are then transferred to larger 6.1-m circular tanks in building 13 where they are reared for one to three years before being transferred back to freshwater when they show the first signs of maturation. While being held at Manchester these ESA listed fish are reared following the best known salmon culture practices that have been developed over the last century. This begins by filtering and treating the natural seawater supplying all tanks with ultraviolet light (UV) to eliminate fish pathogens. In addition, the seawater is chilled as needed to improve the marine rearing environment. Rearing and loading densities within the tanks are held below 8 kg/m3 and 0.29 kg/Lpm respectively to ensure good fish health conditions. All tanks are covered with energy adsorbing netting to prevent injury. Fish are fed an established brood diet and hand fed to behaviorally assess their overall health prior to the loading of automatic feeders. The daily ration is limited to 0.075 lbs feed/gpm to ensure a healthy rearing environment and sampling minimized to reduce handling stress. The rearing tanks are housed within buildings to protect the fish from predation, vandalism, and theft, as well as, provide them a less stressful lowlight environment. Mortalities are picked daily, processed for diagnostic purposes, and therapeutic treatments administered following fish health staff recommendations. Each spring, the fish in all tanks are assessed for maturation status using ultrasound technology and then all maturing fish are transferred to freshwater facilities in Idaho and Oregon for final maturation. These fish culture practices generate up to 400 maturing marine reared spring chinook salmon that Idaho and Oregon can use in their restoration efforts. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $1,243,124
Biological Objectives Metrics
2000 Biological Opinion ESA recovery
2004 Updated Biological Opinion ESA recovery
5.2.1 Fish production/population
Aquatic Objective 2A
Aquatics Objective 1B
Fish Production Goals
# of adults released from program: More than 300 maturing adults for Oregon recovery
# of adults released from program: More than 300 maturing adults for Idaho recovery
# of smolts into program: Up to 750 smolts from Oregon/broodyear
# of smolts into program: Up to 750 smolts from Idaho/broodyear

Coordination Captive propagation program coord. NOAA Fisheries will coordinate the details of rearing parameters for these fish with ODFW and IDFG through the CSCPTOC and CCBPTOT process. NOAA Fisheries staff will have one or more phone and/or email interactions with IDFG, ODFW, Nez Perce Tribe, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, University of Idaho, and NOAA Fisheries regional office staff to coordinate information on fish rearing, health, sampling, and transfer. NOAA Fisheries will coordinate transfer of information from it Fish Health database as needed. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $50,400
Biological Objectives Metrics
2000 Biological Opinion ESA recovery
2004 Updated Biological Opinion ESA recovery
5.2.1 Fish production/population
Aquatic Objective 2A
Aquatics Objective 1B
Fish Production Goals
No Metrics for this Work Element

Manage and Administer Projects Manage project and prepare FY06 SOW with budget Provide oversight of the project and respond to BPA as requested to provide financial, contractual, and administrative documents. Prepare FY 07 Statement of Work for submision to BPA no less than 90 days before end of current performance period. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $75,600
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Annual Report Produce FY 07, 08, and 09 Annual Reports Each contract year prepare an annual report for BPA covering the fish rearing activities conducted during that Fisical Year. 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $50,401
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Status Report Produce status report Conduct online milestone status utilizinng the red/yellow/green designation 12/1/2006 9/30/2009 $2,520
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel [blank] $181,225 $144,980 $130,482
Fringe Benefits [blank] $90,436 $72,349 $65,114
Supplies [blank] $117,400 $93,920 $84,528
Travel [blank] $16,530 $13,224 $11,902
Capital Equipment [blank] $50,000 $40,000 $36,000
Other Rents, communications, utiliities $98,900 $79,120 $71,208
Other Contractual services $98,600 $78,880 $70,992
Overhead [blank] $142,316 $113,853 $102,468
Totals $795,407 $636,326 $572,694

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$2,004,427
Total Work Element budget$2,004,427

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
NOAA Personnel $125,000 $137,500 $151,250 In-Kind Confirmed
NOAA Fringe Benefits $34,150 $37,565 $41,322 In-Kind Confirmed
NOAA Rents, communications, utilities $20,000 $22,200 $24,200 In-Kind Confirmed
NOAA Captial Equipment $60,000 $66,000 $73,200 In-Kind Confirmed
Totals $239,150 $263,265 $289,972

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$515,423 $463,881 These costs will decrease if fish mature at a younger age or increase if BY 06 or later stocks are brought on station.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
Ninety percent of the Project's cost are for operation and maintenance. These costs will increase if additional broodyears or stocks of fish are brought to facility for safety net rearing. They will decrease as existing fish on station mature.
 
Termination Date Comments
11/30/2011 The marine safety net rearing of Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon will terminate with the maturation of six year old BY 05 fish expected to be brought on station in Spring 2007. The program could be extended if additional broodyears or stocks were brought into the program.
 
Final Deliverables
Prespawning adults and Final Report to BPA

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
Location:
Province: Mainstem on the ground/Multiprovince
Subbasin: Mainstem on the ground/Multiprovince
Primary Focal Species
No Change
ARG Comments: [none]


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$795,407
FY 2008 Budget
$636,326
FY 2009 Budget
$572,694
Total NPCC Rec
$2,004,427
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:Multi-province
Recommendation:Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: This project must be funded to complete the evaluation of salt water rearing for captive brood stocks and implement a spread the risk strategy for Idaho stocks. It is identified as a 2004 Biological Opinion and UPA project. It was determined a High Prio


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$795,407
FY 2008 Budget
$636,326
FY 2009 Budget
$572,694
Total NPCC Rec
$2,004,427
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:Multi-province
Comments:
NPCC Staff Comments: MSRT recommends 795,407

MSRT General Comments: This project must be funded to complete the evaluation of salt water rearing for captive brood stocks and implement a spread the risk strategy for Idaho stocks. It is identified as a 2004 Biological Opinion and UPA project. It was determined a High Priority project because this project may not continue after this funding cycle as a core program element, depending on the final evaluation.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: The ISRP recommends “Fundable (Qualified)” with the qualification being that this project needs to be funded only if the Grande Ronde and Salmon River Chinook captive propagation proposals are funded.

The technical and scientific background summarizes the problem facing managers trying to prevent extirpation of depleted animal populations, including Pacific salmon. The ISRP takes exception, however, to the first sentence of paragraph two on page 3: "Captive propagation of animals to maximize their survival and reproductive potential has won acceptance in endangered species restoration (Gipps ....)." In fact there is not a single species the ISRP is aware of that has been brought into captivity because the remaining numbers were so low that extinction was imminent, that has been returned to a self-sustaining status in the wild. Captive propagation remains a highly controversial avenue to pursue and should be regarded as experimental and untested.

Project personnel prepared a generally thorough description of the project's history, providing very succinct and useful summary of the number of smolts from each population that were transferred to Manchester, the ages at which they matured, and the percent survival. It would be good to break this table down by sex as well. Questions remain, however, regarding the continuing need for and desirability of the project. Data presented to justify the project concern the number of fish produced in the program. The real assessment of the project is the character of the contribution to the viability of these stocks. The summary shows success in raising and spawning the affected fish, but there does not seem to be any information available to document the project's impact on the viability of these fish populations.

The objectives were specific work elements. The ISRP believes it appropriate that this project have objectives similar to the 1998010006/1998010001 and 199700100 the Oregon and Idaho project for which they are rearing fish: prevent extirpation of listed ESU or independent populations of Chinook salmon, and contribute to the restoration of self-sustaining natural populations. The benefits are difficult to assess because the goal is to maintain or enhance the viability of the impacted stocks. The fish propagation goals are defined and measurable.

Some benefit may accrue in the short-term for a threatened stock, but the techniques used here are inconsistent with recovery of threatened species in the long-term.

The captive rearing at Manchester is unlikely to have major impacts on non-focal species, particularly since the effluent from the culture system is treated with ozone before discharge to Puget Sound. The most likely sources of impacts would be disease, possibly eutrophication of receiving waters, and interaction with escaped fish. These should be taken care of by the shore-based tank system.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: The ISRP recommends “Fundable (Qualified)” with the qualification being that this project needs to be funded only if the Grande Ronde and Salmon River Chinook captive propagation proposals are funded.

The technical and scientific background summarizes the problem facing managers trying to prevent extirpation of depleted animal populations, including Pacific salmon. The ISRP takes exception, however, to the first sentence of paragraph two on page 3: "Captive propagation of animals to maximize their survival and reproductive potential has won acceptance in endangered species restoration (Gipps ....)." In fact there is not a single species the ISRP is aware of that has been brought into captivity because the remaining numbers were so low that extinction was imminent, that has been returned to a self-sustaining status in the wild. Captive propagation remains a highly controversial avenue to pursue and should be regarded as experimental and untested.

Project personnel prepared a generally thorough description of the project's history, providing very succinct and useful summary of the number of smolts from each population that were transferred to Manchester, the ages at which they matured, and the percent survival. It would be good to break this table down by sex as well. Questions remain, however, regarding the continuing need for and desirability of the project. Data presented to justify the project concern the number of fish produced in the program. The real assessment of the project is the character of the contribution to the viability of these stocks. The summary shows success in raising and spawning the affected fish, but there does not seem to be any information available to document the project's impact on the viability of these fish populations.

The objectives were specific work elements. The ISRP believes it appropriate that this project have objectives similar to the 1998010006/1998010001 and 199700100 the Oregon and Idaho project for which they are rearing fish: prevent extirpation of listed ESU or independent populations of Chinook salmon, and contribute to the restoration of self-sustaining natural populations. The benefits are difficult to assess because the goal is to maintain or enhance the viability of the impacted stocks. The fish propagation goals are defined and measurable.

Some benefit may accrue in the short-term for a threatened stock, but the techniques used here are inconsistent with recovery of threatened species in the long-term.

The captive rearing at Manchester is unlikely to have major impacts on non-focal species, particularly since the effluent from the culture system is treated with ozone before discharge to Puget Sound. The most likely sources of impacts would be disease, possibly eutrophication of receiving waters, and interaction with escaped fish. These should be taken care of by the shore-based tank system.

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