FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 200003900: Walla Walla Subbasin Collaborative Salmonid Monitoring & Evaluation Project

Download this document in MS Word format
Open this document in PDF format

Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Brian Mahoney

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 200003900
Proposal Name: Walla Walla Subbasin Collaborative Salmonid Monitoring & Evaluation Project
BPA Project Manager: Jay Marcotte
Agency, Institution or Organization: Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
Short Description: To provide ecological information and technical services to decision makers in support of adaptive management for restoration, conservation, and preservation of cultural, social, and economic salmonid resources.
Information Transfer: Project staff will collect and analyze extensive data sets describing juvenile fish community structure, resident fish population structure, spawner distributions and densities, passage and adult movements, habitat conditions, and age and growth. Collectively these data are used in a number of plans and management actions including limiting factors analysis, habitat plans, passage restoration, flow augmentation, harvest planning, and hatchery master planning. Project staff will continue to work with other regional scientists to develop, run, and evaluate the Walla Walla Subbasin Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment model used in the Walla Walla Subbasin Plan and addendum. We will submit a final draft comprehensive RM&E plan, and produced several progress reports and peer reviewed papers. Maintain and develop integrated relational databases, interactive maps, and web servers for all data sets used in the project. Present data describing spawners, carcasses, adult movement and passage, juvenile and resident salmonid populations, fish habitat, age and growth, outmigration, and survival at local and regional technical and planning meetings.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Brian Mahoney Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 79772 South Fork Walla Walla River Road
Milton-Freewater, Oregon, 97862
Ph: (541) 938-5785
Fax: (541) 938-5767
Email: bmahoney@oregontrail.net
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Timothy Bailey Oregon Dept. of Fish & Wildlife 73471 Mytinger Lane
Pendleton, OR 97801
Ph: (541) 276-2344
Fax: (541) 276-4414
Email: Timothy.D.Bailey@state.or.us
Project Lead
Julie Burke Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reserva 73239 Confederated Way P.O. Box 638
Pendleton OR 97801
Ph: 541.966.2372
Fax: 541.966.2397
Email: julieburke@ctuir.com
Administrative Contact
Gary James Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Old Mission Highway P.O. Box 638
Pendleton OR 97801
Ph: 541.966.2371
Fax: 541.966.2397
Email: garyjames@ctuir.com
Technical Contact
Brian Mahoney Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 79772 South Fork Walla Walla River Road
Milton-Freewater, Oregon, 97862
Ph: (541) 938-5785
Fax: (541) 938-5767
Email: bmahoney@oregontrail.net
Project Lead
Glen Mendel WDFW 529 W Main St
Dayton, WA 99328
Ph: 509 382-1005
Fax: 509 382-1267
Email: mendegwm@dfw.wa.gov
Project Lead
Jesse Schwartz Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Old Mission Highway P. O. Box 638
Pendleton, OR 97801
Ph: 541-966-2380
Fax: 541-966-2397
Email: JesseSchwartz@ctuir.com
Supervisor

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Walla Walla ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
Walla Walla River Project work will include locations throughout the Walla Walla River Subbasin in Oregon and Washington. , Oregon Walla Walla Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Steelhead Middle Columbia River ESU
Steelhead Snake River ESU
Bull Trout
Mountain Whitefish
Rainbow Trout

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Spawner Surveys, Juvenile Fish and Habitat Surveys, Age Growth and Brood-year Monitoring, Outmigrant Monitoring, Radio Telemetry, Manage and Summarize Data.
2004 Spawner Surveys, Juvenile Fish and Habitat Surveys, Age Growth and Brood-year Monitoring, Outmigrant Monitoring, Radio Telemetry, Manage and Summarize Data.
2003 Water Temperature Monitoring, Spawner Surveys, Juvenile Fish and Habitat Surveys, Age Growth and Brood-year Monitoring, Outmigrant Monitoring, Radio Telemetry, Manage and Summarize Data.
2002 Water Temperature Monitoring, Spawner Surveys, Juvenile Fish and Habitat Surveys, Age Growth and Brood-year Monitoring, Outmigrant Monitoring, Radio Telemetry, Manage and Summarize Data.
2001 Water Temperature Monitoring, Spawner Surveys, Juvenile Fish and Habitat Surveys, Age Growth and Brood-year Monitoring, Outmigrant Monitoring, Radio Telemetry, Manage and Summarize Data.
2000 Water Temperature Monitoring, Spawner Surveys, Juvenile Fish and Habitat Surveys, Age Growth and Brood-year Monitoring, Manage and Summarize Data

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
Other: USFWS-LSRCP [no entry] WDFW LSRCP Evaluations LSRCP M&E - Hatchery steelhead releases, conduct steelhead spawning ground and juvenile surveys, operates adult trap in Dayton, creel census in Walla Walla Basin for steelhead.
Other: USFWS [no entry] USFWS Bull Trout Recovery Project Assist and collaborate with on-the ground work (i.e. WEs), provide logistic support, data, and technical review.
Other: USFWS, USGS, UCFWRU [no entry] Bull Trout Population Assesement in Northeastern Oregon Assist and collaborate with on-the ground work (i.e. WEs), provide logistic support, data and technical review.
PCSRF - WSRFB 00-1695 Walla Walla Watershed Spawning Provide spawner survey data
PCSRF - WSRFB 04-1379 Kooskooskie Dam Fish Passage E Submit fish passage data as needed
PCSRF - WSRFB 04-1605 Gose Street Fish Passage Proje Provide data, technical, and M & E services as needed
PCSRF - WSRFB 04-1606 Hofer Dam Fish Passage Project Provide data, technical, and M &E services as needed
BPA 198810804 Streamnet (CIS/NED) Submit data sets for distribution and use.
BPA 199000501 Umatilla Basin Nat Prod M&E Assist and coodinate M&E efforts as needed.
BPA 199008001 Pit Tag Purchases Requisition project PIT tags
BPA 199405400 Bull Trout Life History Projec Assist and Coodinate M&E efforts as needed; forward bull trout spawner survey data.
BPA 199601200 Anad Fish Passage Walla Walla Evaluate fish passage throughout the basin.
BPA 199604601 Walla Walla River Basin Fish H Assist and coodinate M&E efforts as needed
BPA 199800702 Gd Ronde Supp Lostine O&M/M&E Assist and coordinate M&E efforts as needed
BPA 199802000 Walla Walla R. Habitat Assess. Merges with this project
BPA 200002600 Rainwater Wildlife Area Operat Assist and coordinate M&E efforts as needed
BPA 200003300 Walla Walla River Fish Passage Assist and coordinate M&E and fish salvage efforts as needed
BPA 200203600 Restore Walla Walla River Flow Submit data analysis as requested
BPA 200301700 Integrated Status/Effect Progr Pilot Project for regionally standardized M&E program
BPA 200301700 Integrated Status/Effect Progr This is the pilot project for the development of a Columbia Basin-Wide RM&E program
OWEB - State 204-054 Walla Walla Basin WSC Support Provide data and technical services as needed
PCSRF - OWEB 204-054A Walla Walla Basin WSC Support Provide data and technical services as needed
PCSRF - CRITFC CCT 04-5 Bridge Funding to Operate and Outmigrant monitoring in the Walla Walla Subbasin; Provide data, technical, and M &E services as needed

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Coodinate and administer project Coordinate field activities with USFS, USFWS, NOAA, PNAMP, CSMEP, and the Federal Caucus. Meet the required administrative processes of BPA, GSA, ESA, USFWS, USFS, NMFS, CRITFC, CBFWA, ISRP, NPPC, ODFW, WDFW, ODEQ, TMDL, Watershed assessments, master plans, and subbasin plan. Walla Walla 2.8.26. Adopt locally and regionally standardized Protocols, 2.8.29 Coordinate with Local and Regional Management and Research Groups, and Intergrate Information from these Groups into Assessents of Walla Walla River Subbasin Fisheries Program AD3-39, AD3-40
Effectiveness Monitoring Evaluate program effectiveness in space and time. Walla Walla 2.8.25 Conduct Collaborative Study Planning, Implementation, Synthesis of Results, and Results Dissemination. 2.8.27Coordinate with Local and Regional …Groups, and integrate Information…into Assessments of the Subbasin Fisheries Program. AD3-39, AD3-40
Fish Abundance and Distribution Assess and detect changes in status and trends in abundance and spatial structure of salmonids in the Walla Walla River Subbasin throughout their life history. Walla Walla 2.8.2 M&A the Status and Trends of Abundance... of Hatchery- and Naturally-Reared Salmon, Bull Trout..., 2.8.3 M&A Distr. and Density of Spawners..., 2.8.8 Monitor Adult Spring Chinook Migration and Summer Holding in the subbasin... AD3-25, AD3-29
Fish Diversity Assess salmonid diversity in the Walla Walla River Subbasin. Walla Walla 2.8.11 M&A the Genetic Characteristics of Naturally and Hatchery Reared Spring Chinook and Steelhead. 2.8.16 Monitor and compare Progeny-per-Parent Productivitity of Hatchery-and Naturally-Reared Steelhead and Chinook Salmon. AD3-30, AD3-33
Fish Productivity Assess salmonid productivity in the Walla Walla River Subbasin River Subbasin. Walla Walla 2.8.12 Monitor and Assess the Natural Production and Productivity of Naturally Spawning Out-planted Chinook Salmon in the Walla Walla Subbasin. 2.8.24 Develop Models for Pre-season Estimation of Walla Walla Returns... AD3-35, AD3-37
Report and disseminate findings Complete centralization of data management, and develop node and portal to Streamnet/NED data management and server systems. Walla Walla Manage data according to protocols as developed by the Comprehensive Aquatic Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan, RM&E Objectives 2.8.27-2.8.29. AD3-39, AD3-40

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
1a: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Adult Escapement Collect adult escapement information using video monitoring and physical enumertion from Nursery Bridge Ladder, Bennington Dam Ladder, and Dayton fish weir. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $93,631
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1b: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Summer steelhead (EMAP) surveys Conduct summer steelhead spawner surveys. We will test implement spatially balanced randomized rolling panel surveys of summer steelhead spawning using visual multiple -pass sampling against standard surveys that have been conducted over the past decade to see which method provides the most precise estimate (by population). If similar, the EMAP approach will be adopted 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $180,845
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1c: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Bull trout spawner surveys Conduct bull trout spawner census surveys in the Walla Walla River Subbasin. Bull trout habitat is extremely limited in the Subbasin, and a complete census of these areas is practical, powerful, and informative. In addition, recent attempts to integrate probabilistic surveys of bull trout have proven ineffective. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $91,938
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1d: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Chinook and Coho spawner surveys Conduct Chinook and Coho spawner/redd/carcass census surveys.Chinook and coho spawning habitat is limiting in extent and distribution, but is expected to increase in size at an unpredictable rate due to management intervention. We will conduct a complete census of all known spawning areas for these taxa, but will begin to expand our survey efforts to include a probabilistic survey of expanded spawning using EMAP protocols. We will census all current spawning habitat using 3-pass visual surveys, and will sample an additional ten sites annually for each stock. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $198,582
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1e: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Juvenile and resident fish (EMAP) surveys Conduct (EMAP) surveys of juvenile and resident fish and their habitat.We will conduct EMAP surveys of Walla Walla juvenile and resident salmonids using standardized protocols to assess status and trends, and conduct project and program effectiveness evaluations. This section includes methods for electrofishing, snorkeling, and habitat surveys, collectively termed “summer EMAP surveys”. As requested by the ISRP, the sampling universe for summer EMAP surveys will be all wetted reaches in the subbasin based on the USGS quad. The samples will be selected from the 4964 random points generated by the Corvallis EMAP project. We will use these spatially balanced points to allocate sampling effort evenly across the subbasin. In addition, sampling intensity will be increased as needed in geographic areas that are receiving supplementation, flow, or habitat treatments. Habitat information for the EMAP analyses will be collected by the “Walla Walla Habitat Monitoring and Evaluation Project”, and will be provided in a summarized and analyzed form to the analysts. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $456,693
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1f: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Chinook and steelhead telemetry Monitor adult spring Chinook and steelhead migration and holding to assess spatial and temporal patterns of migration, holding, pre-spawn loss and spawning. We will use radio-telemetry to monitor spring Chinook passage, holding, and spawning. Spring Chinook migrate later in the year than summer steelhead, making summer steelhead radio telemetry information of limited applicability to spring Chinook. We will assess the spatial distribution and temporal patterns in adult abundance (Keefer et al. 2004a, Keefer et al. 2004b, Keefer et al. 2005), delay patterns and fish ladder use (Boggs et al. 2004), and spawning/holding/pre-spawn performance (Eiler et al. 1992, Eiler 1995, Goldstein et al. 1999, Garcia et al. 2004). General telemetry methods will follow our previous telemic work in Walla Walla River Subbasin (Mahoney 2003, Schwartz et al. 2005b). 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $220,161
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1g: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Juvenile salmonid outmigration and survival Assess the abundance and spatial structure (source) of Walla Walla salmonid outmigrants. We will estimate outmigrant abundance at the subbasin scale, and for the three major watersheds, using headwater PIT-tagging and rotary screw traps. Sample Size v. 1.3 (Westhagen et al. 2003) was used to determine the relationship between sample size and power for detecting survival of each brood year of summer steelhead, spring Chinook salmon, and fall Chinook salmon using PIT-tags. Downstream migrant salmonids are trapped, PIT tagged, and tracked as they migrate to the Pacific Ocean from the headwaters of the Walla Walla River Basin through the Columbia River. Rotary screw traps, irrigation canal bypass facilities, beach seining and electroshocking are utilized to capture rearing and emigrating juvenile salmonids. We propose to PIT-tag at least 9K hatchery and natural spring Chinook, and 15K summer steelhead and will opportunistically tag a total of 2K fall Chinook and coho annually.PIT tag detections are analyzed from tagged juvenile salmonids detected at in-basin antenna arrays and traps, and interrogation systems located at mainstem Columbia River dams. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $878,174
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1h: Analyze/Interpret Data Abundance and distribution analysis We will use associative analysis to assess the distribution, correlation, and covariance among abundance and distribution performance metrics. Traditional inferential statistics including ANOVAs, t-tests, regression, and principle components analysis all utilize the associative paradigm. In addition, juvenile population and community estimates will be expanded from the site and reach scale to the tributary, watershed, and subbasin levels of aggregation using geostatistical stock assessment based on habitat data (Petitgas 2001), and fish-habitat relationships (e.g. (Watson and Hillman 1997, Torgersen et al. 1999, Brown et al. 2000, Turgeon and Rodriguez 2005). Finally, smolt emigrant abundance is defined as the number of smolts leaving the Walla Walla River. It is calculated for both hatchery and natural emigrants and is a key component required to address critical uncertainties surrounding in-basin productivity and natural production capacity. Smolt abundance is derived based on the number of fish collected at the lower trap site and the estimated trap efficiency. We currently use the DARR model (Bjorkstedt 2005) for estimating abundance, and attribute the contribution of each watershed to the smolt output based on the fraction of PIT-tag recaptures from each system. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $114,669
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

1i: Analyze/Interpret Data Status and trend analysis (Mountain Whitefish) Assess status and trend in Walla Walla Mountain Whitefish Population. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $77,827
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Abundance and Distribution
No Metrics for this Work Element

2a: Analyze/Interpret Data Out-of-basin harvest assessment Assemble and analyze out-of-basin harvest of Walla Walla Chinook and steelhead for tribal and non-tribal fisheries in collaboration with PSMFC, and NOAA.Out of subbasin harvest information is collected by NOAA, CRITFE, ODFW, and WDFW. The information is assembled by PSMFC. We will work collaboratively with the Agencies and Authorities to analyze out of subbasin harvest information following their guidelines, processes, and standards. Annual out-of-subbasin harvest will be reported for tribal and non-tribal ocean, and Columbia River fisheries. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $49,604
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

2b: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data In-basin harvest assessment Work with ODFW, WDFW, PSMFC, and NOAA to quantify in-basin fishing effort, incidental catch, and harvest rates for tribal and non-tribal fisheries.Non-tribal fisheries will be monitored by ODFW and WDFW using a combination of stratified roving creel surveys and “punchcard” data from anglers that turn in their salmon and steelhead harvest cards. Effort, catch and harvest will be estimated weekly for spring Chinook salmon and monthly for fall Chinook salmon and steelhead. Methods for randomized creel surveys follow (Malvestuto 1996). Walla Walla tribal fisheries are monitored using phone and mail surveys because the effort is so low (Schwartz and Cameron 2005). 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $126,174
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

2c: Analyze/Interpret Data Estimate outmigrant survival Estimate outmigrant survival for Walla Walla salmonids.Survival estimates for hatchery and natural salmonids are conducted to assess in-basin and out-of-basin loss by species and life-stage. Out-of basin survival will be estimated using the CRiSP (www.cbr.washington.edu) and SURPH models. A mark-recapture methodology utilizing PIT tags and subsequent detections at in-basin PIT tag detection antennae arrays, the mainstem Walla Walla River rotary screw trap, and interrogation facilities at Columbia River dams is used to calculate survival. In-basin survival of hatchery salmonids is currently estimated using the Migrant Abundance Method (Dauble et al. 1993). 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $145,884
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

2d: Analyze/Interpret Data Age and growth analysis Conduct age and growth analysis collaboratively with states, PSMFC, and NOAA.Scales are usually the structure of choice for ageing of fish, due to there ease of collection and nonlethal sampling nature.Hard structures (scales, otoliths, fin rays, and opercula) will be collected from juvenile and adult fishes during a variety of sampling activities. These structures can be used to assess age as they all grow in tandem with the fish. Hard structures will be analyzed to detect growth rings and other growth patterns including accelerated development of the nuclei (indicating hatchery-reared origin) and marine/freshwater transitional depositions (indicating years at sea and years in-river).Growth curves will be developed using von Bertalanffy equations (Bertalanffy 1934). Age and growth analysis will be used to estimate rates of biomass accumulation at the geographic area level of aggregation, and to reconstruct run performance. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $130,109
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

2e: Analyze/Interpret Data Fish run and cohort reconstruction Conduct run and cohort reconstruction.We will integrate subbasin information using a relational database. Age, abundance, and distribution information will be used to assign fractions to cohorts, and reconstruct brood years. Brood year by life-stage information will be used to calculate the standard life-history performance metrics such as adult-to-adult, smolt-to-adult, and smolt-to-smolt productivity. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $88,355
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

2f: Analyze/Interpret Data Run estimation Run estimation and time series analysis: Develop predictive models of population performance in time.The current models for run prediction are based solely on the number of returns in years previous to the run, while more sophisticated and powerful methods could be adopted (www.cbr.washington.edu). In addition to the use of simple multivariate regression for predicting and explaining performance, and we will employ multivariate time series analysis (e.g. (Ives et al. 2003).Annual variability at index sites, and of aggregated randomly selected sites, will be analyzed using time-series analysis. Juvenile population and community information will be analyzed using trend analysis for all index sites, and for the aggregation of all index and randomly selected sites to the watershed and subbasin scale. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $71,252
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Productivity
No Metrics for this Work Element

3a: Analyze/Interpret Data Age and cohort diversity Analyze age and cohort diversity.We will develop an aggregated estimate of cohort diversity. Diversity will be expressed in terms of the numbers of possible age classes and geographic areas, and the realized fraction of that capacity. We will compare estimates of life history diversity across space and time using associative, spatial, and time series analysis as described above. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $57,856
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Diversity
No Metrics for this Work Element

3b: Analyze/Interpret Data Run timing diversity Assess outmigration, adult return and spawn timing – Analyze run timing diversity.Information on life history diversity will be collected during outmigrant and adult abundance enumeration (See work element 3.2., Section 10.F). 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $173,262
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Diversity
No Metrics for this Work Element

3c: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Genetic samples Collect and archive genetic material to assist in the quantification of population status, allelic diversity, and reproductive success.We will collect and archive up to 100 samples of each salmonid populations annually to serve in the long-term monitoring and assessment of genetic characteristics. Samples will be taken from adult traps, brood stock, carcasses, and specimens collected during electrofishing surveys. Non-lethal fin clips will be taken to avoid harm, except for mortalities where a sub-dermal sample will be taken from the left epaxial muscle. Samples will be labeled and stored in 100% molecular grade denatured ethanol, and archived by WDFW or NOAA (for anadromous stocks) and the WDFW or Hagerman Genetics Laboratory (for resident stocks). 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $113,055
Biological Objectives Metrics
Fish Diversity
No Metrics for this Work Element

4a: Create/Manage/Maintain Database Invantory project effectiveness Inventory on the ground project action effectiveness. The collaborators assembled a master database of historic, current, and planned activities for the system which was present in the WWSBP. This project will work with local and regional collaborators to support the ongoing maintenance and improvement of this database, and will post results to CBFWA and Streamnet. The dataset will include All-H activities, be georeferenced, and adhere to federal metadata standards. This will allow managers and analysts to keep careful track of the magnitude and nature of effort that is applied to various watersheds. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $78,185
Biological Objectives Metrics
Effectiveness Monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

4b: Analyze/Interpret Data Habitat action effectiveness Analyze habitat action effectiveness. We will use associative, spatial, and time series analysis to compare population performance in space and time as it relates to habitat actions in the tributary. We will use de-trending and shearing analysis to account for out of subbasin impacts on population performance, and will assess the relative progress of treated and reference geographic areas in terms of juvenile and adult abundance, distribution, and productivity. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $42,549
Biological Objectives Metrics
Effectiveness Monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

4c: Analyze/Interpret Data Operations and fisheries Assess the effectiveness of mainstem operations and fisheries in escapement of spawners to the tributary.We will compile mainstem harvest, mainstem escapement, and tributary escapement information and account for loss throughout the system. We will use associative and time series analysis to assess the status and trends in escapement and survival, and compare these to the ESA and US vs. Oregon objectives. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $42,549
Biological Objectives Metrics
Effectiveness Monitoring
No Metrics for this Work Element

5a: Coordination Coordinate field activities Coordinate field activities with USFS, USFWS, NOAA, PNAMP, CSMEP, and the Federal Caucus.The Walla Walla Technical Work Group supports local coordination for all salmonid science activities. Regional forums such as the PNAMP and CSMEP workshops provide an opportunity for refining regionally standardized efforts. We will participate, to the greatest extent possible, in all planning and coordination activities. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $52,943
Biological Objectives Metrics
Coodinate and administer project
No Metrics for this Work Element

5b: Coordination Administration and Process Meet the required administration processes of BPA, GSA, ESA, USFWS, USFS, NMFS, CRITFC, CBFWA, ISRP, NPPC, ODFW, WDFW, ODEQ, TMDL, watershed assessments, master plans, subbasin plan reviews, UMMEOC and the AOP.Participation in the BPA/NWPCC Fish and Wildlife Program carries with it certain environmental compliance and administrative responsibilities. We will work with the Agencies and Authorities to ensure that these requirements are met in a timely and efficient manner. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $132,296
Biological Objectives Metrics
Coodinate and administer project
No Metrics for this Work Element

5c: Produce Plan Walla Walla RM&E Plan Finalize the Walla Walla RM&E Plan.The collaborators will meet quarterly with management to extract the priority management and RM&E requirements of the subbasin plan. We will refine our local power analyses based on 2007-2008 study efforts, and will submit a draft RM&E plan to the ISRP for review in 2008. We will respond to edits and produce a final comprehensive salmonid RM&E for NWPCC in 2009. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $118,789
Biological Objectives Metrics
Coodinate and administer project
No Metrics for this Work Element

6a: Create/Manage/Maintain Database Manage Data Manage Data – Complete centralization of data management, and develop node and portal to Streamnet/NED data management and server systems.This collaboration is currently engaged with the Agencies and Authorities under EPA and BPA cost-matched support to centralize and automate, to the greatest extent possible, all information streams in the RM&E projects. To date we have centralized, and begun to serve, radio telemetry, spawner/carcass, harvest, and habitat information. We will work during the 2007-2009 funding cycle to integrate juvenile/resident fish survey information, and will begin to design and develop the automation systems for moving data from field crews to public servers. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $80,700
Biological Objectives Metrics
Report and disseminate findings
No Metrics for this Work Element

6b: Other PISCES status reporting Produce Report – Produce quarterly reports using PISCES system.We will meet all BPA requirements associated with PISCES status reporting. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $57,063
Biological Objectives Metrics
Report and disseminate findings
No Metrics for this Work Element

6c: Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Annual report Produce annual report.We will produce an annual report of activities, and bi-annual summaries of findings. Reports will be completed with the editorial input of BPA and the collaborating Agencies and Authorities. Final reports will be made available on the tribal, state, and BPA websites. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $133,046
Biological Objectives Metrics
Report and disseminate findings
No Metrics for this Work Element

6d: Other Produce reports Produce and present peer-reviewed reports via direct submissions and participation in local and regional technical conferences and workshops.Due to the management importance and technical nature of this project we participate in an extensive peer-review process. That adaptive loop begins with a local and ISRP review of plans and proposals, and ends ultimately with a national and international peer-review via technical journals. We will publish the results of our efforts in the Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, North American Journal of Fisheries Management, Journal of Fish Biology, Ecology, Conservation Biology, Ambio, BioScience, Journal of Ecological Modeling, and the Columbia Basin Journal – should one become available. We will present our findings at the Oregon and National American Fisheries Society Conference, at the PNAMP and CSMEP workshops, and to the Society for Conservation Biology and Ecological Society of America when possible and appropriate. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $210,022
Biological Objectives Metrics
Report and disseminate findings
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel WDFW-SRL Touchet Smolt & Other $65,897 $69,192 $72,656
Fringe Benefits WDFW-SRL Touchet Smolt & Other $21,087 $22,141 $23,250
Supplies WDFW-SRL Touchet Smolt & Other $20,512 $10,500 $10,500
Travel WDFW-SRL Touchet Smolt & Other $1,128 $1,150 $1,175
Capital Equipment WDFW-SRL Touchet Smolt & Other $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Overhead WDFW-SRL Touchet Smolt & Other $31,381 $29,865 $31,198
Other WDFW-SRL 5K PIT tags Touchet Smolt $10,300 $10,300 $10,300
Personnel CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E $459,255 $491,402 $525,801
Fringe Benefits CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E $91,010 $97,381 $104,197
Supplies CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E $124,570 $57,570 $44,570
Travel CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E $32,174 $32,174 $32,174
Capital Equipment CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Overhead CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E $261,593 $251,055 $261,495
Other CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E (pass-through) $11,400 $7,400 $7,400
Other CTUIR/ODFW-WWM&E (PIT-tags) $58,500 $58,500 $58,500
Personnel WDFW- FM RM&E $112,464 $118,087 $129,896
Fringe Benefits WDFW FM RM&E $37,113 $38,969 $42,866
Supplies WDFW FM RM&E $22,000 $17,000 $8,000
Travel WDFW FM RM&E $3,667 $3,500 $4,000
Capital Equipment WDFW FM RM&E $ 0 $10,000 $ 0
Overhead WDFW FM RM&E $53,324 $51,296 $53,378
Totals $1,417,375 $1,377,482 $1,421,356

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$4,216,213
Total Work Element budget$4,216,213

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
CTUIR-Summer Youth Jobs Program Shared Work Elements & other $8,960 $8,960 $8,960 In-Kind Confirmed
Gardena, Hudson Bay, & Walla Walla River Irr. Dist Shared Work Elements & other $6,750 $6,750 $6,750 In-Kind Confirmed
NOAA Pilot project for regional RME $200,000 $210,000 $225,000 In-Kind Confirmed
Tri-State Steelheaders Shared Work Elements & other $1,200 $1,200 $1,200 In-Kind Confirmed
USACE-Bennington Dam Ladder Counts Shared Work Elements & other $19,917 $19,917 $19,917 In-Kind Confirmed
USFWS - Lower Snake Compensation Plan Shared Work Elements & Other $62,500 $63,875 $65,153 In-Kind Confirmed
USFWS-BT Recovery Shared Work Elements & other $38,400 $38,400 $38,400 In-Kind Confirmed
USU-BT Pop. Assessement Shared Work Elements & other $24,000 $24,000 $24,000 In-Kind Confirmed
WDFW Salmonid HBT assesment Shared Work Elements & Other $120,000 $120,000 $120,000 In-Kind Confirmed
Whitman College Interns $4,500 $4,500 $4,500 Cash Confirmed
WWBWC-OWEB Shared Work Elements & other $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 In-Kind Confirmed
Totals $486,227 $497,602 $513,880

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$1,467,000 $1,555,000 This is the long-term regionally standardized M&E project for the Walla Walla Subbasin
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
This collaborative effort is the extension of the Fish and Wildlife Program's regionally standardized monitoring and evaluation efforts.
 
Termination Date Comments
 
Final Deliverables

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$914,360
FY 2008 Budget
$914,360
FY 2009 Budget
$914,360
Total NPCC Rec
$2,743,080
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: Sponsor should address ISRP concerns the next time they report to Bonneville (copy to Council staff) and in the next project review process.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$533,333
FY 2008 Budget
$533,333
FY 2009 Budget
$533,333
Total NPCC Rec
$1,599,999
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:
NPCC Staff Comments: WA recommends 1.6m for 3 yrs. Oregon recommends $2.25 for 3 yrs. The WA recommendation could increase if 199601100 is capitalized. Sponsor should address ISRP concerns in their next report to Bonneville and in the next project review process.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: Most of the ISRP’s comments were adequately addressed. The sponsors, however, did not truly address the need for prioritization of M&E actions to answer key management questions. The ISRP recognizes that the sponsors provided sound justification for their basic monitoring designs, taking an EMAP approach to assess smolt emigration and adult returns. Moreover, the conceptual Venn diagram is a good heuristic tool and the sponsors did provide better information on completion of tasks and activities, but they did not provide much quantitative data of findings to date. Thus, while the response represents an important improvement, the originally identified deficiency remains in place. Ultimately, the ISRP will need some detailed specifics to more fully evaluate the rigor of the science behind this collaborative M&E project.

The ISRP also identifies the need for this project (and directly related projects) to undergo an independent, comprehensive, site review to assess the integration of M&E data with management decisions before the next cycle of project funding. The sponsors have been conducting this project for six years. What is the justification for continuing project and what has been learned (and management adapted or maintained to date)?

Qualification: Finally, a decision analysis framework for fisheries management is required that incorporates risk assessment and options. As presented, the response (which is similar to that from Proposal #199905001) did not address the alignment of M&E tasks with key management decisions and objectives (as provided reasonably well within the Walla Walla Subbasin Plan (see Table 7.9)). In short, Objectives as listed in the proposal and response do not provide a clear program of data-driven evaluation and adaptive management.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Response requested
NPCC Comments: This project proposal is an omnibus collaboration for M&E in the Walla Walla basin by co-managers to address the 4 H's. As such it is exhaustive and identifies many elements for monitoring and evaluation.

In general this proposal was very difficult to review and evaluate as it lacks articulation of clear and prioritized monitoring objectives and clear purpose. While liberally peppered with algebraic expressions, it is not clear what was to be monitored and evaluated. Specifically, what management decisions are the sponsors tying this work to? Moreover, similar to the Umatilla M&E projects, this project proposes to "measure everything" without some prioritization of activities tied to specific information needs.

We recommend a roadmap of sorts as to who is going to do what and when? That the many contributors and co-managers participated in the proposal is a refreshing and potential strength, it is a little unclear who will do what and the enormity of the enterprise. The project is a collaboration between ODFW, WDFW, and CTUIR. The project is closely related to several BPA funded projects and CTUIR projects. The sponsors provide a table and description of the roles of each agency in the project, but they do not provide adequate descriptions of what the roles actually are. What does “participation” mean functionally? What is the specific role of the “coordinating agency”? How will analyses be shared?

In many cases the descriptions are vague, confusing, and repetitive. The proposal needs to be better organized and more concise. For example, in the “Approach“ section the approach is not described. Also, the discussion of the “Experimental Design” is vague and confusing. A clear picture of the design does not emerge from the description in this section nor does it make clear the integrative nature of the project.

Simple grammatical errors, figures located many pages away from the first text reference, and incorrect references to tables and figures hampered review and could easily have been corrected. For example, Table 2 (referred to as Table 6 in the text) does not describe a sampling design (significant details required of a sampling design are not considered) as the sponsors suggest. It is primarily a list of metrics and methods. Tables are incorrectly referred to in the text. Such mechanical errors in proposal preparation do not convey confidence that the work will be conducted with attention detail.

The project history is not organized according to the original objectives, and thus it is not possible to determine whether the objectives have been achieved. The sponsors provide information on what activities they engaged in and do not summarize the major findings of these actions. They mention development of an RM&E plan but do not describe the plan. The individual projects appear to have accomplished quite a bit. It is not clear, however, from the description of the project history why the collaborative effort is needed and what it will accomplish. Specific information regarding stock assessment is particularly important.

Description of the monitoring program should have been consolidated instead of discussed in pieces throughout the proposal. While detailed descriptions of some of the methods and analyses, others such as the habitat work were entirely omitted. The project history section needs to list findings (effectiveness) from previous work and not merely activities that have been instituted. Also, the proposal refers to tables and figures, but infrequently interprets the information within them.

What is it that is being monitored and evaluated, and why? As presented, this proposal is not an adaptive management experiment, but an attempt to provide complete assessment of all salmonids at every life stage. Essentially, we are not convinced of the feasibility of delivering the enormity of the project and that information will be used in an adaptive management context. This is so large that as proposed it is difficult to see how they will accomplish their task and actually evaluate the data for management application.

Ultimately, the ISRP recommends that this project (and related ones) be the subject of site and program review within the next 2 years.

Below are some specific comments on individual work elements:

WE 1.1. Will the dam counts provide an estimate of adult returns for all important spawning areas? How will smolt/spawner ratios indicate whether in-basin factors are limiting?

WE 1.2. How will the redd and carcass counts be related to adult counts at dams?

WE 1.3. The sponsors do not appear to be aware of the problems associated with counting bull trout redds. The sponsors conclude there is no consistent trends in redd counts but then they go on to say that the time series is too short to conclude that there is no declining trend in one of the tributaries. You can’t have it both ways. There is clearly a sharp declining trend in the North Fork Touchet. What does “collaborative analysis” mean? It is not possible to distinguish bull trout spawning areas in figure 10.

WE 1.4. How will coho redds be distinguished from Chinook redds?

WE 1.5. The sponsors provide no description of the methods for habitat monitoring and evaluation and how this data will be analyzed. The instead refer to a report. Proposals are supposed to be stand-alone documents and so habitat monitoring should have been described. If the sponsors can provide minute details on some sampling methods and data analysis, they should also provide a description of the habitat monitoring program including metrics, sampling scheme, etc.

WE 1.6. The sponsors refer to “spawning/holding/ and pre-spawn performance” of Chinook but do not explain what they mean by performance.

WE 1.7. The whole discussion of placement of the screw traps is unclear.

WE 2.3. The sponsors did not define “freshwater productivity”. Is this work related to WE 1.7?

WE 2.4. How will “biomass accumulation” and “productivity” be determined?

Objective 4. The monitoring program should be described in more detail. How does it related to the work described in Objectives 1-3? What are the reference areas? Treatment areas? Will a BACI design be employed? How will the “hypothesis” that status and trends are related to management activities be tested? How does this program related to project-specific monitoring?

Maintained by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority. Please direct comments or questions to the webmaster.