FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199901000: Pine Hollow/Jackknife Habitat

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Joli Munkers

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199901000
Proposal Name: Pine Hollow/Jackknife Habitat
BPA Project Manager: Jamie Swan
Agency, Institution or Organization: Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District (SWCD)
Short Description: Implement practices to reduce erosion, flooding, and protect critical areas in the stream corridor which will allow natural recovery of riparian vegetation and channel stability in the Pine Hollow and Jackknife watersheds.
Information Transfer: Information concerning the project will be transferred to BPA in the form of metrics, such as number of habitat/water quality improvement projects installed, number of stream miles protected, number of acres protected from peak flows, etc. Metrics will be reported on a 5th field watershed scale.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Joli Munkers Sherman County SWCD P.O. Box 405
Moro, OR, 97039
Ph: 541-565-3216
Fax: 541-565-3430
Email: joli.munkers@oacd.org
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Krista Coelsch Sherman County SWCD P.O. Box 405
Moro, OR 97039
Ph: (541) 565-3551
Fax: (541) 565-3430
Email: krista.coelsch@oacd.org
Administrative Contact
Jason Faucera Sherman County SWCD P.O. Box 405
Moro, OR 97039
Ph: (541) 565-3551
Fax: (541) 565-3430
Email: jason.faucera@oacd.org
Project Lead
Joli Munkers Sherman County SWCD P.O. Box 405
Moro, OR, 97039
Ph: 541-565-3216
Fax: 541-565-3430
Email: joli.munkers@oacd.org
Form Submitter

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: John Day ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
45.3 120.5 John Day River at RM 60 Sherman, Oregon John Day No
45.3 120.65 NE corner of Jackknife Canyon Sherman, Oregon John Day No
44.7 121.0 SE Headwaters of Pine Hollow Creek Sherman, Oregon John Day No
44.7 120.5 John Day River at RM 103 Sherman, Oregon John Day No

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Steelhead Middle Columbia River ESU
All Wildlife
Interior Redband Trout
Big Horn Sheep, Ferruginous Hawk, Grasshopper Sparrow, Sage Sparrow, American Beaver, Great Blue Heron, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Upland Game Birds, Migratory Species

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Installed 2 Spring Developments to reduce riparian grazing pressure. Installed 2 pasture cross fences to improve grass stand health and reduce riparian grazing pressure.
2004 Installed 1 well pumped to a livestock/wildlife watering system to reduce grazing pressure on 1.7 miles of riparian habitat.
2003 Installed 4 spring developments to reduce grazing pressure on 2 miles of streambanks. Installed 6 WASCBs to reduce peak flows from 1,468 acres of crop/rangeland. Improved 130 acres of pasture grassland to reduce riparian grazing pressure.
2002 No work was done due to lack of moisture to construct conservation structures. Unable to receive State Historical Preservation Office concurrance before the end of the construction window.
2001 Installed 1 Spring Development to reduce riparian grazing pressure. Installed 4 pasture cross fences to improve grass stand health and reduce riparian grazing pressure.
2000 Installed 6 WASCBs, 1 cross fence, 2 spring developments, 1 well development, 1 solar pump, 50 acres of native range seeding and 1 livestock waterline.
1999 Installed 12 WASCBs, 9 gradient terraces, 2 cross fences, 1 livestock watering facility. Began steelhead spawning surveys, temperature monitoring, and PFC in Pine Hollow. Upland restoration practices began. 20 stream miles enrolled in CREP.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 200201500 Provide Coordination and Technical Assistance to Watershed Councils and Individuals in Sherman County, Oregon This project provides technical assistance and coordinatiion from three planners/designers and one watershed coordinator to implement habitat/water quality improvent projects throughout Sherman County, Oregon.
OWEB - State 204-142 Sherman Co Conservation Work 2 Using OWEB and BPA funds combined, this grant implements 6,498 feet of terrace, 22 cropland WASCBs, 10 rangeland WASCBs, 6,800 feet of crossfencing, and 2 spring developments throughout the Sherman County watersheds.
OWEB - State 206-123 Grass Valley, Pine Hollow/Jack This project is targeted to help reduce erosion on cropland by implementing 85,162 feet of terrace, and 18 cropland WASCBs. The project also targets rangeland and riparian zone health by implementing 1 rangeland WASCB and 1 spring development for off-channel livestock watering. Without technical assistance and coordination through staff supported by BPA funds, this project would not be accomplished.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees in Pine Hollow/Jackknife spawning streams by October 2009. John Day Riparian habitat improvements including management of riparian grazing and vegetation. Upland improvements obtained through vegetative, structural, or management activities designed to improve water quality. 257-277
Increase spawning success To increase the spawning success of steelhead and redband trout in the Pine Hollow and Jackknife Watersheds by October 2009. John Day Flow restoration including off-stream storage basins and efforts to improve hydrological connectivity between springs and streams. Upland improvements obtained through vegetative, structural, or management activities designed to improve water quality. 257-277

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
01: Upland Erosion and Sedimentation Control Construct WASCB Construct Rangeland WASCBs to reduce water course and gully erosion, trap sediment, and reduce and manage onsite and downstream runoff to improve water quality. BPA funds will be provided to the landowner to cost share the earth moving involved in forming each WASCB structure. Landowners may complete the installation themselves or may hire a subcontractor to complete the installation. NRCS specifications are used on all engineering practices. Technical assistance is provided (before, during, and after) project implementation to ensure adherence to NRCS specifications. WASCBs consist of a constructed berm and spillway designed to capture, store, and safely release runoff within a specified watershed. Funding for project selection, developing plans, designs and technical assistance to landowners for project implementation is paid in part by BPA Project 2002-015-00 and other agencies participating in the cost share of this project and is not covered under this contract. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $24,788
Biological Objectives Metrics
Increase spawning success
No Metrics for this Work Element

02: Develop Alternative Water Source Construct Off-Stream Watering Facilities From Developed or Undeveloped Water Source Uses pipeline, trough, and protective fencing to connect to a water source on an off-stream watering facility. Alternative water development can take the form of a trough to provide water for domestic livestock and wildlife. Alternative watering systems reduce grazing pressure on riparian areas by providing an upland water source that draws cattle away from creek beds. BPA funds will be provided to the landowners to cost share the purchase and installation of the pipe and trough. Landowners may complete the installation themselves or may hire a subcontractor to complete the installation. Materials may include PVC pipe, protective fencing, and a trough. An overflow system is also included to deliver excess water back to the watershed. NRCS specifications are used on all engineering practices. Technical assistance is provided (before, during, and after) project implementation to ensure adherence to NRCS specifications. Funding for project selection, developing plans, designs and technical assistance to landowners for project implementation is paid in part by BPA Project 2002-015-00 and other agencies participating in the cost share of this project and is not covered under this contract. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $26,914
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees
No Metrics for this Work Element

03: Install Fence Installation of Cross Fences Fencing projects will allow better utilization of upland pastures, and separate management of riparian areas. Funding for project selection, developing plans, designs and technical assistance to landowners for project implementation is paid in part by BPA Project 2002-015-00 and other agencies participating in the cost share of this project and is not covered under this contract. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $4,958
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees
No Metrics for this Work Element

04: Remove vegetation Brush Control Brush control projects allow reestablishment of grass cover and will increase infiltration of precipitation. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $4,958
Biological Objectives Metrics
Increase spawning success
* # of acres treated: 250

05: Plant Vegetation Pasture Reseeding Pasture reseeding will be utilized in areas that were cropped or overgrazed earlier in the century to remove annuals and replace them with native perennial grasses. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $4,958
Biological Objectives Metrics
Increase spawning success
* # of acres of planted: 250

06: Manage and Administer Projects Manage & Administer Project Prepare FY07-FY09 statement of work, budget, spending plan and inventory list. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $1,417
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees
Increase spawning success
No Metrics for this Work Element

07: Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Obtain Environmental Compliance For Upland Projects NEPA Checklists, T&E and Cultural Resources surveys. Obtain Environmental Compliance for Upland Projects (water and sediment control basins (WASCBs), water/solar/spring developments and fencing). Cost associated with this work element are paid in part by BPA Project 2002-015-00 and other agencies participating in the cost share of this project. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $1,417
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees
Increase spawning success
No Metrics for this Work Element

08: Produce Annual Report Annual Report (October 1, 2006 - September 30, 2009) Annual Reports will be submitted to BPA each year no later than 90 days after the end of the annual performance period. Cost associated with this work element are paid in part by BPA Project 2002-015-00 and other agencies participating in the cost share of this project. 10/1/2006 9/30/2009 $1,417
Biological Objectives Metrics
Decrease water temperatures to below 64 degrees
Increase spawning success
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Other Subcontracts $21,363 $21,363 $21,363
Overhead Fiscal mangement and project coordination $2,146 $2,146 $2,146
Travel Travel for project technician $100 $100 $100
Totals $23,609 $23,609 $23,609

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$70,827
Total Work Element budget$70,827

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
Landowners Cost-share on practices $3,350 $3,350 $3,350 Cash Confirmed
ODFW Participation in watershed council, spawning survey, other activities $600 $600 $600 In-Kind Confirmed
SWCD Administration, monitoring, supplies $4,100 $4,100 $4,100 Cash Confirmed
Totals $8,050 $8,050 $8,050

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$23,609 $23,609 Subcontracts, Administration, Travel
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
Actual Operation and Maintenance costs are the responsibility of the landowners/operator.
 
Termination Date Comments
2011
 
Final Deliverables
Third Year Deliverables (FY 07 - FY 09): 1) Six alternate water sources 2) 5,000 feet of cross fencing 3) Four rangeland WASCBs 4) 250 acres of brush removal and reseeding

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Do Not Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: Despite the low cost and ISRP designation, project did not rank high enough in subbasin ratings.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This is a well-written proposal for another cost-effective SWCD project that will leverage private and public money to achieve subbasin environmental improvements. The proposal shows good collaboration with other resource agencies and is well integrated with private interests.

The proposal does a good job describing the causes and effects of watershed impairment, as well as the history of collaboration among landowners and agencies in addressing problems of aquatic habitat quality and quantity. The project is clearly linked to the limiting factors and restoration priorities identified in the John Day Subbasin Plan, as well as to regional programs. Benefits are clearly defined; however, it would be useful to have more detail on the nature of the linkages among the various riparian buffer projects

Specific results of the project’s several years of implementation are reported. The accomplishments are impressive and represent good cost-sharing and leveraging. However, more evaluative detail on the effectiveness of past projects (actual impact, beyond enrollment numbers) would be helpful. It would also be useful to know how the results of the project fit within the overall needs of the watershed to have a better understanding of how recovery is progressing.

Objectives are clearly stated in measurable terms, with time lines, in ways that address limiting factors identified in the subbasin plan. The project will use straightforward approaches. M&E is tied to each objective. Methods are clearly described in specific terms and relate well to objectives. Justification for each work element is clearly provided. This project appears to have excellent interagency and landowner coordination in implementing work elements.

Effectiveness monitoring is conducted in collaboration with ODFW and landowners. The effect of restoration is monitored in part through redd counts and water temperature. The redd count data presented in the proposal show sensitivity to drought years, and it would be interesting to know the sponsors’ thinking on how this effect might be alleviated. M&E is also a component of the work elements for each habitat improvement project. Lists of indicators and performance standards are provided as a way to monitor habitat improvements. The metrics are measurable and reasonable. Information on project results will be reported on the form of metrics: water quality improvement, number of stream miles, water quality projects, etc.

Benefits to focal species in the John Day Subbasin Plan (steelhead and redband trout) are clear and should be long lasting. The changes being made in the process of restoration are likely to be permanent, although the question of how to further protect in-stream flows in drought years should be addressed.

Overall, this proposal outlines a practical, on-the-ground approach to protection of focal species. The improvements provided by project activities should also benefit a wide range of non-focal aquatic and terrestrial species.

See comments under proposal 200201900 and the programmatic section of this report on SWCD projects.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable
NPCC Comments: This is a well-written proposal for another cost-effective SWCD project that will leverage private and public money to achieve subbasin environmental improvements. The proposal shows good collaboration with other resource agencies and is well integrated with private interests.

The proposal does a good job describing the causes and effects of watershed impairment, as well as the history of collaboration among landowners and agencies in addressing problems of aquatic habitat quality and quantity. The project is clearly linked to the limiting factors and restoration priorities identified in the John Day Subbasin Plan, as well as to regional programs. Benefits are clearly defined; however, it would be useful to have more detail on the nature of the linkages among the various riparian buffer projects

Specific results of the project’s several years of implementation are reported. The accomplishments are impressive and represent good cost-sharing and leveraging. However, more evaluative detail on the effectiveness of past projects (actual impact, beyond enrollment numbers) would be helpful. It would also be useful to know how the results of the project fit within the overall needs of the watershed to have a better understanding of how recovery is progressing.

Objectives are clearly stated in measurable terms, with time lines, in ways that address limiting factors identified in the subbasin plan. The project will use straightforward approaches. M&E is tied to each objective. Methods are clearly described in specific terms and relate well to objectives. Justification for each work element is clearly provided. This project appears to have excellent interagency and landowner coordination in implementing work elements.

Effectiveness monitoring is conducted in collaboration with ODFW and landowners. The effect of restoration is monitored in part through redd counts and water temperature. The redd count data presented in the proposal show sensitivity to drought years, and it would be interesting to know the sponsors’ thinking on how this effect might be alleviated. M&E is also a component of the work elements for each habitat improvement project. Lists of indicators and performance standards are provided as a way to monitor habitat improvements. The metrics are measurable and reasonable. Information on project results will be reported on the form of metrics: water quality improvement, number of stream miles, water quality projects, etc.

Benefits to focal species in the John Day Subbasin Plan (steelhead and redband trout) are clear and should be long lasting. The changes being made in the process of restoration are likely to be permanent, although the question of how to further protect in-stream flows in drought years should be addressed.

Overall, this proposal outlines a practical, on-the-ground approach to protection of focal species. The improvements provided by project activities should also benefit a wide range of non-focal aquatic and terrestrial species.

See comments under proposal 200201900 and the programmatic section of this report on SWCD projects.

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