FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199000500: Umatilla Hatchery - M&E

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Gerold Grant

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199000500
Proposal Name: Umatilla Hatchery - M&E
BPA Project Manager: Jonathan McCloud
Agency, Institution or Organization: Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW)
Short Description: This proposal is for ongoing research, monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery program. The Umatilla Hatchery RM&E Project evaluates hatchery practices for steelhead supplementation and spring and fall Chinook salmon reintroduction.
Information Transfer: Information is disseminated in annual reports, special reports to BPA, peer reviewed scientific articles, and on the stream net website.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Gerold Grant ODFW 203 Badgley Hall, One University Blvd., EOU
La Grande, OR 97850
Ph: 541-962-3755
Fax: 541-962-3067
Email: ggrant@eou.edu
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Gerold Grant ODFW 203 Badgley Hall, One University Blvd., EOU
La Grande, OR 97850
Ph: 541-962-3755
Fax: 541-962-3067
Email: ggrant@eou.edu
Form Submitter

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Umatilla ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
45° 54' 79" N 119° 33' 28" W Umatilla Hatchery Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.6884 -118.3614 Meacham Creek Bonnifer Springs acclimation facility Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.7124 -118.3440 Umatilla River Imeques acclimation facility Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.6851 -118.4488 Umatilla River Thornhollow acclimation facility Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.6742 -118.6104 Umatilla River Minthorn Springs acclimation facility Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.8882 -119.3238 Umatilla River Three Mile Falls Dam Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.6731 -118.7894 Umatilla River Pendleton acclimation facility Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla No
45.6622 -118.8636 Umatilla River Entire Umatilla River Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Chinook Mid-Columbia River Spring ESU
Chinook Upper Columbia River Summer/Fall ESU
Steelhead Middle Columbia River ESU

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Closed spring Chinook fishery early due to creel survey results, made in-season run prediction adjustments, changed spring Chinook regulation to prohibit harvest of natural fish due to Comprehensive Assessment Report recommendation.
2004 Completed draft of Comprehensive RM&E Plan to guide future research, shifted more spring Chinook production to Umatilla Hatchery due to poor survival of fish from Little White Salmon Hatchery, and reduced rearing density at LWSH.
2003 Shifted spring Chinook rearing to Michigan raceways as result of Michigan-Oregon evaluations, stopped size grading of steelhead to better evaluate release location.
2002 Began releasing steelhead at Pendleton to increase recreational harvest and rearing site evaluation initiated, completed releases for Michigan-Oregon evaluations for spring Chinook, completed draft of comprehensive assessment report for Umatilla program.
2001 Began evaluation of fall Chinook release location and size on survival and straying.
2000 Estimated take of ESA listed steelhead from creel surveys, developed in-season prediction for spring Chinnook run, opened lower river fishery as result of creel survey results.
1999 Used telemetry to asses juvenile migration, downsized subyearling fall Chinook program due to poor survival and marking costs, shifted small grade steelhead release site from Bonnifer to Minthorn due to poor survival.
1998 Initiated PIT tagging of juvenile fish for migration timing and survival, determined SAS of fall Chinook from Michigan/Oregon ponds were similar and documented subjack production and straying to Snake, began fall transfer evaluation for spring Chinook.
1997 Initiated rearing density comparison for fall Chinook salmon and paint marking of juvenile fish. Based on evaluations, management adapted to eliminate May releases of steelhead, targets for steelhead survival and production should be lowered.
1996 Shifted subyearling fall Chinook rearing to Michigan raceways and began rearing density evaluation, eliminated subyearling spring Chinook program, began freeze branding steelhead and reading steelhead CWTs prior to spawning.
1995 Initial adult returns from Umatilla Hatchery releases were documented, and the second year of creel data obtained. Suggestions included the continued use of Michigan raceways, elimination of gill ATPase monitoring, and improvements to Bonnifer Springs.
1994 Documented juvenile migration time to JDD, physiological indications of smoltification, and blank wire tagged all Umatilla fall Chinook salmon to allow removal from the Snake River. Segregation of spring Chinook salmon progeny suggested to control BKD.
1993 In addition to activities performed in 1992, initiated creel surveys for sport harvest of salmon and steelhead. Results include elimination of body tagging, releases of spring Chinook salmon during high water, and the flourescent antibody test.
1992 Monitored and evaluated hatchery practices (egg take, survival, rearing densities, and Michigan/Oregon systems), marking and fin clipping, and fish health. Resulted in adjustments in rearing densities for steelhead, tagging and release timing for Chinook.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 198343500 Umatilla Hatchery O&M - CTUIR The Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Faclilities Operation and Maintenance Project operates and maintains the adult holding and spawning facilities and juvenile acclimation and release facilities. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project coordinates closely with the Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities O&M Project to share data, including adult spawning data, coded wire tag data, juvenile release data. Personnel from the Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project coordinate PIT tagging operations with the Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities O&M Project and staff regularly visit acclimation sites during operation to monitor juvenile fish health and condition.
BPA 198802200 Umatilla Fish Passage Ops The Umatilla Fish Passage Operations Project monitors flow and passage condition, oversees flow enhancement activities, transports juvenile and adult fish during low flows, and runs the adult trapping facility at Three Mile Falls Dam. The adult trap at Three Mile Falls Dam is the primary data gathering location for fish returning to the Umatilla River. Located at river mile 3.7, Three Mile Falls Dam has an adult ladder and trap where fish are collected for broodstock, sacrificed for coded wire tag recovery, or passed upriver for harvest or spawning in the wild. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project recieves data on adult returns, broodstock collection, and coded wire tag data from the Fish Passage Operations Project. The two projects coordinate to determine run timing and collection schedules for broodstock and coded wire tag collection. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project combines data from creel surveys in the lower Umatilla River with counts provided by Fish Passage Operations to determine run sizes to the Umatilla River and harvest levels for in-season adjustments to the spring Chinook salmon recreational fishery regulations, including early closure if harvest quotas have been achieved. Data provided from the Fish Passage Operations Project is also used by the Hatchery M&E Project to develop pre-season and in-season run predictions.
BPA 198902401 Eval Um Juvenile Sal Out Migra The Umatilla Outmigration and Survival Project works closely with the Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project to estimate migration parameters, health and survival of hatchery juveniles. The Umatilla Outmigration and Survival Project runs juvenile trapping facilities in the lower Umatilla River and provides data on outmigration timing of hatchery smolts. Timing of hatchery and natural smolts is compared to evaluate life history traits, especially the comparison of natural and hatchery steelhead to assess supplementation efforts. The Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project calculates in-subbasin and out-of-subbasin survival estimates of hatchery smolts and correlates survival with environmental characteristics to assess the success of hatchery releases in the Umatilla River and identify potential bottlenecks on survival. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E and Umatilla Outmigration and Survival projects collaborate on PIT tagging of juvenile fish, share office space, supplies, and vehicles and personnel when needed to complete study objectives. The two projects coordinate in study planning and design (e.g. Comprehensive RM&E Plan), publication of results (e.g. Comprehensive Assessment Report) and other tasks (e.g. BOR steelhead take study).
BPA 198902700 Power Repay Umatilla Basin Pro The Power Repay Umatilla Basin Project provides instream flow enhancement through exchange of Columbia River water for instream water rights from water diverters in the Umatilla Subbasin. The Hatchery M&E Project evaluates the effects of flow enhancement on hatchery juvenile and adults and coordinates with the Power Repay Project on optimal water release timing for adult passage and juvenile migration based on environmental conditions and planned timing of juvenile releases in the Umatilla River.
BPA 198903500 Umatilla Hatchery O&M - ODFW The Umatilla Hatchery O&M Project operates the Umatilla Hatchery, including collecting adults for broodstock, transporting broodstock to holding facilities, spawning adults, collecting and transporting eggs, hatching eggs, ponding fry, rearing juveniles, marking juveniles and transporting eggs and juveniles from the hatcheries to acclimation and release sites. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project coordinates closely with the Hatchery O&M Project to coded wire tag and mark juveniles for identification of hatchery origin and rearing and release strategy, to evaluate optimal hatchery operations practices, to monitor fish health and administer profylactic treatments, determine optimum release sizes, timing and locations, and PIT tag juveniles for outmigration and survival monitoring. The Hatchery M&E Project determines optimal broodstock collection timing based on past run timing (provided by Fish Passage Operations Project) and provides pre-season run estimates to plan adult collection strategies and egg sources. The Hatchery M&E Project reports program performance by assessing juvenile survival in coordination with the Umatilla Outmigration and Survival Project, adult production and survival (smolt-to-adult survival and smolt-to-adult return), straying, and in-subbasin and out-of-subbasin fisheries harvest to assess the optimal rearing, acclimation and release strategies. These include optimal raceway type (oxygen or non-oxygen supplemented), rearing densities, release timing, release location, and acclimation strategies. Based on the results of Hatchery M&E Project results, management of the Umatilla Hatchery Program is adapted to maximize effectiveness of reintroduction and supplementation programs. The Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project samples adults used for broodstock and collected on the spawning grounds and juveniles from raceways and acclimation facilties to monitor fish health, administer or recommend profylactic treatments, prevent disease outbreaks in hatchery or natural fish in the Umatilla River, and maximize hatchery production. Tagging and marking procedures are closely coordinated between the Umatilla Hatchery O&M and M&E projects, with hatchery O&M performing mass marking of juveniles and M&E performing coded wire tagging and PIT tagging of juveniles.
BPA 199000501 Umatilla Basin Nat Prod M&E The Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project and Umatilla Natural Production M&E Project work together to compare production, survival and harvest of naturally and hatchery-produced fish in the Umatilla Subbasin. The Natural Production M&E project performs spawning ground surveys and documents reproduction of natural and hatchery steelhead and Chinook salmon in the wild. The Natural production M&E Project estimates productivity (smolts-per-spawner in cooperation with the Umatilla Outmigration and Survival Project and progeny/parent ratios) of naturally-produced steelhead and Chinook salmon, which are compared to productivity of hatchery steelhead and Chinook salmon estimated by the Hatchery M&E Project. The Hatchery M&E Project performs creel surveys for the Umatilla recreational fisheries, while the Natural Production M&E Project performs creel surveys for the tribal fisheries. These data are used to assess the success of harvest mitigation programs and to estimate fish available to spawn in the wild. The Natural Production M&E Project also estimates abundance and PIT tags naturally produced steelhead and Chinook salmon juveniles. These estimates are used to assess the success of hatchery supplementation programs and compare survival and migration of hatchery and naturally-produced juveniles (survival and migration timing of hatchery juveniles is collected by the Umatilla Outmigration and Survival Project, see below). The Natural production M&E project collects life history information for natural steelhead, and the Umatilla Hatchery M&E Project collects life history information for hatchery steelhead. These life history traits are compared to insure the steelhead supplementation program is not affecting life history characteristics of the steelhead population. The Natural Production M&E Project and Hatchery M&E Project collaborate on planning and study design (e.g. Comprehensive RM&E Plan), publishing research results (e.g. Comprehensive Assessment Report), and other coordinated activities (e.g. BOR steelhead take evaluation).

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Assess straying of summer steelhead and Chinook sa Monitor and assess straying of adult summer steelhead and Chinook salmon returns from the Umatilla Subbasin hatchery program. Umatilla Management Objectives 1, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 15 and Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-4 to 5-7
Assess whether management actions maximize non-tri Assess whether management actions maximize non-tribal fishery opportunities under the current co-management agreement while meeting production and population objectives. Umatilla Management Objectives 13, 14, 15, and Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-5 to 5-7
Compare life history characteristics of hatchery a Monitor and assess life history characteristics of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and compare to life history characteristics of naturally-reared summer steelhead in cooperation with CTUIR. Umatilla Management Objectives 3, 6, 8, 9 5-5
Conduct creel surveys of Umatilla River non-tribal Quantify effort, catch, and harvest for non-tribal recreational Chinook salmon and summer steelhead fisheries in the Umatilla River. Umatilla Management Objectives 1, 7, 13, 15, 16, and Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-4 to 5-7
Develop run predictions for Umatilla summer steelh Develop prediction models for Umatilla River returns to facilitate management of subbasin fisheries in cooperation with co-managers. Umatilla Management Objectives 6, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16 and Harvest Objective for spring Chinook salmon (Table 2) 5-5 to 5-7
Estimate progeny-per-parent productivity of hatche Calculate progeny-per-parent productivity of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon and compare to progeny-per-parent productivity of naturally-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon in cooperation with CTUIR. Umatilla Management Objectives 3, 5, 8, 14, 15 5-4 to 5-5
Evaluate rearing and release strategies Evaluating two ongoing rearing and acclimation/release strategy comparisons as well as future strategies implemented during FY07-09. Umatilla Management Strategies 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 and Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-5 to 5-7
Monitor broodstock collection and artificial spawn Monitor summer steelhead and Chinook salmon broodstock collection and artificial spawning to assess whether collection and spawning goals and protocols are met. Umatilla Management Objectives 6, 7, 8 5-5
Monitor fish health Improve broodstock survival and disease status of naturally and hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon. Umatilla Management Objectives 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 15 5-5 to 5-6
Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to acc Monitor smolt production, smolt condition and migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, adult production, and harvest and spawning contributions of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon to ensure a full accounting of all artificial production strategies. Umatilla Management Objectives 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-4 to 5-7
Monitor status and trends of hatchery summer steel Monitor and assess the status and trends of adult Chinook salmon and summer steelhead abundance, life history, returns to the Umatilla River, and productivity by hatchery- and naturally -reared origin in cooperation with CTUIR. Umatilla Management Objectives 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16 and Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-4 to 5-7
Quantify out-of-subbasin harvest of Umatilla summe Quantify harvest of Umatilla summer steelhead and Chinook salmon in out-of-subbasin fisheries. Umatilla Management Objectives 1, 8, 13, 15, 16 and Biological Objectives (Table 2) 5-4 to 5-7

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
01: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to account for all artificial production strategies Monitor smolt production, smolt condition and migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, adult production, and harvest and spawning contributions of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon to ensure a full accounting of all artificial production strategies. Summer steelhead, yearling spring Chinook salmon and subyearling fall Chinook salmon are reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery. In addition, Umatilla spring Chinook salmon reared at Little White Salmon Hatchery and Umatilla fall Chinook salmon reared at Bonneville Hatchery are released as yearlings in the Umatilla River. To monitor the success of each stock and rearing strategy, we quantify the number of smolts released and smolt condition (length, weight, condition factor, descaling, and smoltification status) at release. All spring Chinook salmon and steelhead are adipose clipped, and a subset of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead smolts are coded-wire tagged and ventral fin clipped. Fall Chinook salmon are either codedwire tagged and adipose fin-clipped (subyearlings) or blank-wire tagged and unclipped (yearlings). A subset of fall Chinook salmon yearlings are also coded-wire tagged and adipose fin-clipped. In addition, a subset of smolts from each rearing group are PIT tagged and smolt survival and migration performance to Three Mile Falls, John Day, and Bonneville dams is assessed by the Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. We evaluate adult returns from each production group, including adults harvested in and out of the Umatilla Subbasin, broodstock collected, strays, spawning escapement monitored by the Umatilla Passage Operations Project, and contribution to natural spawners reported by the Umatilla Natural Production Project. Smolt-to-adult survival, harvest and spawning contributions of each production group are determined using CWT recoveries compiled and reported by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) database. Coded wire tags are recovered in fisheries, at terminal locations (hatcheries, dams, weirs, etc.), from hatchery broodstock, and from carcasses recovered on the spawning grounds. 3/1/2007 5/31/2009 $14,308
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to acc
No Metrics for this Work Element

02: Mark/Tag Animals Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to account for all artificial production strategies Monitor smolt production, smolt condition and migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, adult production, and harvest and spawning contributions of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon to ensure a full accounting of all artificial production strategies. Summer steelhead, yearling spring Chinook salmon and subyearling fall Chinook salmon are reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery. In addition, Umatilla spring Chinook salmon reared at Little White Salmon Hatchery and Umatilla fall Chinook salmon reared at Bonneville Hatchery are released as yearlings in the Umatilla River. To monitor the success of each stock and rearing strategy, we quantify the number of smolts released and smolt condition (length, weight, condition factor, descaling, and smoltification status) at release. All spring Chinook salmon and steelhead are adipose clipped, and a subset of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead smolts are coded-wire tagged and ventral fin clipped. Fall Chinook salmon are either coded wire tagged and adipose fin-clipped (subyearlings) or blank-wire tagged and unclipped (yearlings). A subset of fall Chinook salmon yearlings are also coded-wire tagged and adipose fin-clipped. In addition, a subset of smolts from each rearing group are PIT tagged and smolt survival and migration performance to Three Mile Falls, John Day, and Bonneville dams is assessed by the Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. We evaluate adult returns from each production group, including adults harvested in and out of the Umatilla Subbasin, broodstock collected, strays, spawning escapement monitored by the Umatilla Passage Operations Project, and contribution to natural spawners reported by the Umatilla Natural Production Project. Smolt-to-adult survival, harvest and spawning contributions of each production group are determined using CWT recoveries compiled and reported by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) database. Coded wire tags are recovered in fisheries, at terminal locations (hatcheries, dams, weirs, etc.), from hatchery broodstock, and from carcasses recovered on the spawning grounds. 11/1/2006 11/30/2009 $659,626
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to acc
No Metrics for this Work Element

03: Submit/Acquire Data Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to account for all artificial production strategies Monitor smolt production, smolt condition and migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, adult production, and harvest and spawning contributions of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon to ensure a full accounting of all artificial production strategies. Summer steelhead, yearling spring Chinook salmon and subyearling fall Chinook salmon are reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery. In addition, Umatilla spring Chinook salmon reared at Little White Salmon Hatchery and Umatilla fall Chinook salmon reared at Bonneville Hatchery are released as yearlings in the Umatilla River. To monitor the success of each stock and rearing strategy, we quantify the number of smolts released and smolt condition (length, weight, condition factor, descaling, and smoltification status) at release. All spring Chinook salmon and steelhead are adipose clipped, and a subset of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead smolts are coded-wire tagged and ventral fin clipped. Fall Chinook salmon are either codedwire tagged and adipose fin-clipped (subyearlings) or blank-wire tagged and unclipped (yearlings). A subset of fall Chinook salmon yearlings are also coded-wire tagged and adipose fin-clipped. In addition, a subset of smolts from each rearing group are PIT tagged and smolt survival and migration performance to Three Mile Falls, John Day, and Bonneville dams is assessed by the Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. We evaluate adult returns from each production group, including adults harvested in and out of the Umatilla Subbasin, broodstock collected, strays, spawning escapement monitored by the Umatilla Passage Operations Project, and contribution to natural spawners reported by the Umatilla Natural Production Project. Smolt-to-adult survival, harvest and spawning contributions of each production group are determined using CWT recoveries compiled and reported by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) database. Coded wire tags are recovered in fisheries, at terminal locations (hatcheries, dams, weirs, etc.), from hatchery broodstock, and from carcasses recovered on the spawning grounds. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $12,970
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to acc
No Metrics for this Work Element

04: Analyze/Interpret Data Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to account for all artificial production strategies Monitor smolt production, smolt condition and migration performance, smolt-to-adult survival, adult production, and harvest and spawning contributions of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon to ensure a full accounting of all artificial production strategies. Summer steelhead, yearling spring Chinook salmon and subyearling fall Chinook salmon are reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery. In addition, Umatilla spring Chinook salmon reared at Little White Salmon Hatchery and Umatilla fall Chinook salmon reared at Bonneville Hatchery are released as yearlings in the Umatilla River. To monitor the success of each stock and rearing strategy, we quantify the number of smolts released and smolt condition (length, weight, condition factor, descaling, and smoltification status) at release. All spring Chinook salmon and steelhead are adipose clipped, and a subset of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead smolts are coded-wire tagged and ventral fin clipped. Fall Chinook salmon are either codedwire tagged and adipose fin-clipped (subyearlings) or blank-wire tagged and unclipped (yearlings). A subset of fall Chinook salmon yearlings are also coded-wire tagged and adipose fin-clipped. In addition, a subset of smolts from each rearing group are PIT tagged and smolt survival and migration performance to Three Mile Falls, John Day, and Bonneville dams is assessed by the Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. We evaluate adult returns from each production group, including adults harvested in and out of the Umatilla Subbasin, broodstock collected, strays, spawning escapement monitored by the Umatilla Passage Operations Project, and contribution to natural spawners reported by the Umatilla Natural Production Project. Smolt-to-adult survival, harvest and spawning contributions of each production group are determined using CWT recoveries compiled and reported by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) database. Coded wire tags are recovered in fisheries, at terminal locations (hatcheries, dams, weirs, etc.), from hatchery broodstock, and from carcasses recovered on the spawning grounds. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $84,671
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor hatchery releases and adult returns to acc
No Metrics for this Work Element

05: Submit/Acquire Data Monitor broodstock collection and artificial spawning Monitor summer steelhead and Chinook salmon broodstock collection and artificial spawning to assess whether collection and spawning goals and protocols are met. Adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla Subbasin are collected for broodstock at the fish ladder at TMFD. Natural and hatchery fish are collected following guidelines agreed on by comanagers. Protocols include collecting natural and hatchery steelhead throughout the run year, collecting spring Chinook salmon based on historic run timing, and collecting all fall Chinook salmon until broodstock goals are met. We will compare steelhead broodstock collection timing to run timing to TMFD on a biweekly or monthly basis. We will assess whether protocols outlined in the Annual Operating Plan for spawning matrices, use of hatchery/natural origin fish, and disease screening are met for Chinook salmon and steelhead. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $14,308
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor broodstock collection and artificial spawn
No Metrics for this Work Element

06: Analyze/Interpret Data Monitor broodstock collection and artificial spawning Monitor summer steelhead and Chinook salmon broodstock collection and artificial spawning to assess whether collection and spawning goals and protocols are met. Adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla Subbasin are collected for broodstock at the fish ladder at TMFD. Natural and hatchery fish are collected following guidelines agreed on by comanagers. Protocols include collecting natural and hatchery steelhead throughout the run year, collecting spring Chinook salmon based on historic run timing, and collecting all fall Chinook salmon until broodstock goals are met. We will compare steelhead broodstock collection timing to run timing to TMFD on a biweekly or monthly basis. We will assess whether protocols outlined in the Annual Operating Plan for spawning matrices, use of hatchery/natural origin fish, and disease screening are met for Chinook salmon and steelhead. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $15,706
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor broodstock collection and artificial spawn
No Metrics for this Work Element

07: Analyze/Interpret Data Evaluate rearing and release strategies Evaluate two ongoing rearing and release strategies and any future strategies implemented during the 2007-09 fiscal years. The two ongoing strategies include: Evaluate if rearing in ambient water temperature in fall will increase smolt-to-adult survival of spring Chinook salmon compared to standard rearing at Umatilla Fish Hatchery. Transfer of spring Chinook salmon to acclimation facilities in the fall was initiated to test if a more natural temperature regime during rearing would increase smolt-to-adult survival compared to rearing fish in the warmer well water at UFH and transferring fish to the acclimation facility in winter. To compare acclimation strategies, we will compare survival and migration performance of PIT tagged smolts and smolt-to-adult survival between the groups using ANOVAs. Evaluations will include the 1998-2001 brood years (released 2000-2003) and adult returns through the 2006 run year. Coded wire tag data will be analyzed by 2007 and data analysis completed by 2008. Both transfer strategies and associated PIT tagging are being continued until the analysis of adult returns is complete to determine the best transfer and release strategy to implement. Intitial outmigration comparisons are complete, but will continue for future release groups until smolt-to-adult survival analysis for the initial evaluation is complete. Evaluate if smolt-to-adult survival of subyearling hatchery fall Chinook salmon can be improved by programmatic changes including larger size-at-release and direct-stream release lower in the subbasin. Subyearling fall Chinook salmon will be released using two strategies and smolt-to-adult survival will be compared between groups. One group will be direct-stream released lower in the subbasin (RM 48) at a larger size (35/lb.), while a second group will be acclimated and released at the Thornhollow facility (RM 74) at a smaller size (50/lb.). Because the size and release location/strategy are confounded by keeping one group in the hatchery environment while the second group is in acclimation ponds and experiencing a different thermal regime, it is not logistically possible to design a factorial experiment. Migration performance of PIT tagged smolts and smolt-to-adult survival will be compared between release strategies using ANOVAs. Smolt-to-adult survival will be calculated for each release strategy using adult return data from CWT recoveries and adult returns to TMFD. The original evaluation was scheduled for the 2000-2004 brood years (released 2001-2005), however the 2001 and 2004 brood years were omitted because low flow resulted in altered release times and locations. The evaluation will be extended through the 2005 brood year (released in 2006), adult returns will be assessed through the 2009 run year, coded wire tag data will be analyzed by 2010 and data analysis completed by 2011. Evaluate smolt-to-adult survival among fall Chinook salmon reared at three densities in Michigan raceways: Subyearling fall Chinook salmon were reared at three densities in Michigan raceways in early evaluations of rearing strategies for the Umatilla Hatchery. The last brood year for this experiment was 1999, and five year old adults returned in the 2004 run year. Based on the final CWT recovery data, we will compare smolt-to-adult survival among the three rearing groups using ANOVAs. The evaluation will conclude when all coded-wire tag data have been analyzed and results will be reported in annual reports to BPA. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $133,863
Biological Objectives Metrics
Evaluate rearing and release strategies
No Metrics for this Work Element

08: Analyze/Interpret Data Quantify out-of-subbasin harvest of Umatilla steelhead and Chinook salmon Quantify harvest of Umatilla summer steelhead and Chinook salmon in out-of-subbasin fisheries. Annual harvest of Umatilla River origin Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in ocean and Columbia River fisheries will be estimated by hatchery group with coded-wire tag recovery data from the PSMFC database. We will categorize harvest by tribal and non-tribal ocean, and tribal and non-tribal Columbia River fisheries. Subcategories for ocean harvest will be United States, Canadian, and tribal treaty commercial fisheries and a single category for all ocean sport fisheries. Subcategories of Columbia Basin fisheries include tribal commercial, tribal subsistence, non-tribal commercial, and non-tribal sport in the mainstem Columbia River above and below Bonneville Dam, and non-tribal harvest in Columbia Basin tributaries other than the Umatilla River. Trends will be determined with general linear models and/or spectrum analysis. Results will be reported annually in both brood year and run year formats. 3/1/2007 10/31/2009 $17,044
Biological Objectives Metrics
Quantify out-of-subbasin harvest of Umatilla summe
No Metrics for this Work Element

09: Analyze/Interpret Data Assess straying of steelhead and Chinook salmon from Umatilla hatchery program Monitor and assess straying of adult summer steelhead and Chinook salmon returns from the Umatilla Subbasin hatchery program. Straying of adult steelhead and Chinook salmon produced at the Umatilla hatchery is monitored by marking all fall Chinook salmon with either a blank wire tag or coded wire tag, and a proportion of summer steelhead and spring Chinook salmon with coded wire tags. Wire tags allow fish produced at the Umatilla Hatchery to be separated from wild fish passing Lower Granite Dam and recovery of coded-wire tagged fish allows us to estimate straying outside of the Umatilla River. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $21,494
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare life history characteristics of hatchery a
Estimate progeny-per-parent productivity of hatche
Monitor status and trends of hatchery summer steel
No Metrics for this Work Element

10: Submit/Acquire Data Monitor status and trends of hatchery steelhead and Chinook salmon Monitor and assess the status and trends of adult Chinook salmon and summer steelhead abundance, life history, returns to the Umatilla River, and productivity by hatchery- and naturally -reared origin in cooperation with CTUIR. Adult abundance will be determined as the sum of adult returns to Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD, RM 3.7), harvest in the ocean, Columbia Basin, and Umatilla River below TMFD, and strays. The Umatilla Passage Operations Project enumerates adult returns to TMFD by species, hatchery-natural origin, and adult age class by trapping fish that ascend the ladder. Fish passage is monitored by video when the trap is not operating. We receive data on adults trapped and estimate the composition of the untrapped return by species, sex, age class, and hatchery/natural origin for summer steelhead, using the trap data from the periods immediately before and after each video monitoring period. Strays and harvest outside of the Umatilla River are estimated from coded-wire tag recoveries from fisheries and adults recovered at other terminal locations. Harvest in the Umatilla River below TMFD is estimated from creel surveys. We monitor adult life history characteristics including age structure, sex ratios, and length. Inbasin productivity will be estimated as the number of smolts-per-spawner from spawner abundance data collected by the Umatilla Natural Production Project and smolt abundance estimates collected by the Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. Adult-to-adult productivity will be measured as progeny-per-parent ratios using spawner abundance data and estimates of total adult production resulting from each brood year. Data will be entered into spreadsheet and trends will be assessed through time using general linear models and/or spectrum analysis. 7/1/2007 9/1/2009 $16,950
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor status and trends of hatchery summer steel
No Metrics for this Work Element

11: Analyze/Interpret Data Monitor status and trends of hatchery steelhead and Chinook salmon Monitor and assess the status and trends of adult Chinook salmon and summer steelhead abundance, life history, returns to the Umatilla River, and productivity by hatchery- and naturally -reared origin in cooperation with CTUIR. Adult abundance will be determined as the sum of adult returns to Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD, RM 3.7), harvest in the ocean, Columbia Basin, and Umatilla River below TMFD, and strays. The Umatilla Passage Operations Project enumerates adult returns to TMFD by species, hatchery-natural origin, and adult age class by trapping fish that ascend the ladder. Fish passage is monitored by video when the trap is not operating. We receive data on adults trapped and estimate the composition of the untrapped return by species, sex, age class, and hatchery/natural origin for summer steelhead, using the trap data from the periods immediately before and after each video monitoring period. Strays and harvest outside of the Umatilla River are estimated from coded-wire tag recoveries from fisheries and adults recovered at other terminal locations. Harvest in the Umatilla River below TMFD is estimated from creel surveys. We monitor adult life history characteristics including age structure, sex ratios, and length. Inbasin productivity will be estimated as the number of smolts-per-spawner from spawner abundance data collected by the Umatilla Natural Production Project and smolt abundance estimates collected by the Umatilla Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. Adult-to-adult productivity will be measured as progeny-per-parent ratios using spawner abundance data and estimates of total adult production resulting from each brood year. Data will be entered into spreadsheet and trends will be assessed through time using general linear models and/or spectrum analysis. 7/1/2007 10/31/2009 $35,193
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor status and trends of hatchery summer steel
No Metrics for this Work Element

12: Analyze/Interpret Data Estimate progeny-per-parent productivity of hatchery steelhead and Chinook salmon Calculate progeny-per-parent productivity of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon and compare to progeny-per-parent productivity of naturally-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon in cooperation with CTUIR. Progeny-per-parent productivity indicates the success of salmonids in producing offspring that survive to reproduce. By comparing progeny-per-parent ratios of naturally- and hatchery-reared salmonids, we can measure the ability of artificial rearing to impart a survival advantage to hatchery-produced salmonids. Progeny-per-parent productivity is calculated by dividing the estimated adult returns from each hatchery brood by the number of adults spawned to produce the brood. Adult returns are estimated by brood year from CWT recoveries using adult age data. Progeny-per-parent productivity from Umatilla Fish Hatchery will be compared to natural production in the Umatilla and other nearby watersheds (Yakima, Tucannon, Imnaha, Minam, and John Day rivers). Umatilla natural production data will be aquired from the Umatilla Natural Production Project (CTUIR). 7/1/2007 10/31/2009 $56,446
Biological Objectives Metrics
Estimate progeny-per-parent productivity of hatche
No Metrics for this Work Element

13: Analyze/Interpret Data Compare life history characteristics of hatchery and natural steelhead Monitor and assess life history characteristics of hatchery-reared summer steelhead and compare to life history characteristics of naturally-reared summer steelhead in cooperation with CTUIR. Smolt migration timing will be determined for hatchery-produced summer steelhead from juvenile traps operated by the Smolt Outmigration and Survival Project. Migration timing and sex ratios will be compared between hatchery and wild summer steelhead from adult returns to TMFD collected by the Umatilla Fish Passage Operations Project. Ocean residency age structure will be determined by length criteria from returning adults collected at TMFD. 7/1/2007 10/31/2009 $28,999
Biological Objectives Metrics
Compare life history characteristics of hatchery a
No Metrics for this Work Element

14: Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Conduct creel surveys for non-tribal Umatilla River recreational fisheries Quantify effort, catch, and harvest for non-tribal recreational Chinook salmon and summer steelhead fisheries in the Umatilla River. Non-tribal fisheries will be monitored in the Umatilla River from RM 0-3.7 and RM 37-55 to estimate catch and harvest using stratified roving creel surveys. Catch and harvest will be categorized by adult, jack, and subjack for Chinook salmon and hatchery and natural origin for summer steelhead and spring Chinook salmon. Angling effort will be expressed as total number of anglers hours and angler day trips. Catch composition data collected includes sex, length, and external marks. Snouts will be collected from all harvested coded-wire tagged fish. Data will be entered into spreadsheets and analyzed, trends will be assessed through time series analysis, and data will be reported to co-managers and BPA. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $248,435
Biological Objectives Metrics
Conduct creel surveys of Umatilla River non-tribal
No Metrics for this Work Element

15: Analyze/Interpret Data Conduct creel surveys for non-tribal Umatilla River recreational fisheries Quantify effort, catch, and harvest for non-tribal recreational Chinook salmon and summer steelhead fisheries in the Umatilla River. Non-tribal fisheries will be monitored in the Umatilla River from RM 0-3.7 and RM 37-55 to estimate catch and harvest using stratified roving creel surveys. Catch and harvest will be categorized by adult, jack, and subjack for Chinook salmon and hatchery and natural origin for summer steelhead and spring Chinook salmon. Angling effort will be expressed as total number of anglers hours and angler day trips. Catch composition data collected includes sex, length, and external marks. Snouts will be collected from all harvested coded-wire tagged fish. Data will be entered into spreadsheets and analyzed, trends will be assessed through time series analysis, and data will be reported to co-managers and BPA. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $49,888
Biological Objectives Metrics
Conduct creel surveys of Umatilla River non-tribal
No Metrics for this Work Element

16: Analyze/Interpret Data Assess whether management actions maximize fishery opportunities Assess whether management actions maximize non-tribal fishery opportunities under the current co-management agreement while meeting production and population objectives. Creel data will be analyzed to determine if current management maximizes non-tribal recreational fishing opportunities. We will assess whether current fishery objectives and harvest goals are achieved within the constraints co-management objectives. If fishery objectives are not met, we will assess the potential of alternative management actions for adjusting fishery opportunities, including changes in fishing regulations, hatchery production, or rearing and release strategies. By adjusting the amount, distribution, timing, or duration of catch, harvest, or incidental mortality, alternative management might improve fishery opportunities while continuing to meet other management objectives for natural spawning escapement and minimizing negative impacts to natural fish populations. 7/1/2007 10/31/2009 $11,113
Biological Objectives Metrics
Assess whether management actions maximize non-tri
No Metrics for this Work Element

17: Analyze/Interpret Data Develop pre-season run estimates for Umatilla steelhead and Chinook salmon Develop prediction models for Umatilla River returns to facilitate management of subbasin fisheries in cooperation with co-managers. Estimating adult summer steelhead and Chinook salmon returns to the Umatilla River allows managers and program staff to plan broodstock collection and spawning escapement strategies and subbasin fisheries. Predictions for spring Chinook salmon are based on the previous run year jack escapement to the Umatilla River mouth. Predictions for summer steelhead and fall Chinook salmon are based on same year run predictions past Bonneville Dam. Linear regression models are currently used to estimate run sizes. We will work collaboratively with CTUIR in a team setting to investigate new run prediction methods using retrospective analysis and additional variables, such as ocean condition indices. 6/15/2007 9/30/2009 $42,777
Biological Objectives Metrics
Develop run predictions for Umatilla summer steelh
No Metrics for this Work Element

18: Maintain Fish Health Monitor fish health Broodstock survival and disease status of naturally and hatchery-reared summer steelhead and Chinook salmon. Adult salmonids collected for broodstock are held at Umatilla Program Satellite Facilities prior to spawning. The survival of broodstock is monitored by Satellite Facilities Operations and Maintenance Project staff and the incidence of disease is monitored by the ODFW fish health services laboratory in La Grande. A minimum of 60 fish are examined for culturable viruses as per fish health section bluebook methods. All female spring and fall Chinook salmon spawners are assayed for Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) antigen by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Family groups are tracked to allow for aggressive BKD management by culling eggs from infected groups. Broodstock survival is reported annually by the Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Juvenile hatchery fish health is monitored through rearing and release. Five fresh-morbid or moribund fish from each raceway are sampled monthly. Health of natural fish is assessed through disease testing on mortalities encountered during smolt outmigrant trapping. Kidneys of Chinook salmon are assayed for Rs, the causative agent of BKD by ELISA as per methodology adopted from Pascho and Mulcahy (1987). Sixty fish from Umatilla Hatchery will be tested annually for Myxobolus cerebralis, the causative agent of Whirling Disease. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $303,516
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor fish health
No Metrics for this Work Element

19: Coordination Coordinate with local and regional management and M&E groups Coordinate with local and regional management groups and integrate information from these groups into assessments of the Umatilla Subbasin fisheries program. The Umatilla Management, Monitoring and Evaluation Oversight Committee (UMMEOC) will meet to coordinate research projects, program operation, staff, and co-management. The UMMEOC is a forum to discuss and implement program performance, research, and adaptive management. We will also share information with regional projects in nearby watersheds including the John Day, Walla Walla, and Grande Ronde subbasins to compare status and trends in fish abundance, productivity, and habitat. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $37,572
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor fish health
No Metrics for this Work Element

20: Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Produce and publish manuscripts in scientific publications Produce one manuscript per year on the research results and submit to scientific journals for publication. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $171,160
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor fish health
No Metrics for this Work Element

21: Produce Annual Report Annual report production Produce Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Annual Report An annual report will be prepared that summarizes work conducted annually. 11/1/2006 10/31/2009 $139,876
Biological Objectives Metrics
Monitor fish health
No Metrics for this Work Element

22: Manage and Administer Projects Manage and administer project Submit draft scope of work/budget/FY accruals/FY metrics/RPAs 6/1/2007 12/31/2009 $20,971
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

23: Produce Status Report Produce quarterly status reports [Work Element Description Not Entered] 11/1/2006 8/1/2009 $7,611
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel 5.51 FTE $241,091 $253,145 $265,803
Fringe Benefits [blank] $122,999 $129,149 $135,606
Supplies [blank] $82,806 $85,291 $87,849
Travel [blank] $22,495 $23,170 $23,865
Overhead indirect rate 35.87% $177,714 $185,658 $193,970
Other Contract services (tagging/marking) $26,049 $26,830 $27,635
Other PIT tags 5,400@$2.06/tag Purchased by BPA $11,124 $11,124 $11,124
Totals $684,278 $714,367 $745,852

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$2,144,497
Total Work Element budget$2,144,497

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$783,146 $822,303 [Outyear comment field left blank]
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
 
Termination Date Comments
 
Final Deliverables

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$572,848
FY 2008 Budget
$572,848
FY 2009 Budget
$572,848
Total NPCC Rec
$1,718,544
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Fund
Comments: See decision memo discussion of the Umatilla subbasin projects.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$572,848
FY 2008 Budget
$572,848
FY 2009 Budget
$572,848
Total NPCC Rec
$1,718,544
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:
NPCC Staff Comments: See decision memo comment

Local or MSRT Comments: OSPIT recommends holding project funding to FY06 levels plus $12,000 and flatlined. The additional $12K provides for the ad clip and release group Coded Wire Tag, plus some additional fish health monitoring. OSPIT hopes to find greater synergies with the


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: This proposal does an excellent job of identifying the problem and providing the technical background. The section on relationship to other projects was particularly helpful, both for understanding this project proposal and the others mentioned. The proponents are to be thanked and congratulated for supplying this vital information despite the limitations of the format of the proposal form.

Past history of some efforts is properly glossed over. These have been commented upon in past ISRP reviews. A history of review and adaptation within the program is clearly evident, with continual improvements, reporting, and publication. Success and failures are noted, and a list of adaptive management examples was tabled. Research continues on release strategies, but more work may be required on the issue of acclimatization sites and steelhead residualism, as well as evidence of collaboration on supplementation studies in the basin.

The reported results seem to indicate that the hatchery is not contributing to natural fish populations (see Figures 1 and 2). Are there other actions that need to occur besides hatchery releases and their habitat restoration activities to increase abundance?

The methods and procedures for collecting data on recovery of marked fish will be done by related projects that are specified. The goal is to obtain full accounting of all artificial production strategies -- a worthy goal. A missing ingredient seems to be designation of responsibility for combining description of both steps, the marking and recovery methods. Since it appears that the present project has the ultimate responsibility for analysis of the objectives specified, are we to assume that the progress report of this project will include both?

The ISRP qualifies this fundable recommendation suggesting that this program (Umatilla Program) is too complex to adequately review in an annual process and needs a more intensive review including a site visit, and presentation and discussion of results. Such a site review should be comprehensive enough to include an assessment of program goals and measurable objectives, results to date based on whether the program is leading to increased natural production (preliminary data to date do not show this is happening), design and structure of M&E program, and importance of entire O&M elements. Also, there is need to show how co-manager's programs are working together (or at least in communication).

See ISRP comments on the “Umatilla Initiative” under proposal 198343600.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: This proposal does an excellent job of identifying the problem and providing the technical background. The section on relationship to other projects was particularly helpful, both for understanding this project proposal and the others mentioned. The proponents are to be thanked and congratulated for supplying this vital information despite the limitations of the format of the proposal form.

Past history of some efforts is properly glossed over. These have been commented upon in past ISRP reviews. A history of review and adaptation within the program is clearly evident, with continual improvements, reporting, and publication. Success and failures are noted, and a list of adaptive management examples was tabled. Research continues on release strategies, but more work may be required on the issue of acclimatization sites and steelhead residualism, as well as evidence of collaboration on supplementation studies in the basin.

The reported results seem to indicate that the hatchery is not contributing to natural fish populations (see Figures 1 and 2). Are there other actions that need to occur besides hatchery releases and their habitat restoration activities to increase abundance?

The methods and procedures for collecting data on recovery of marked fish will be done by related projects that are specified. The goal is to obtain full accounting of all artificial production strategies -- a worthy goal. A missing ingredient seems to be designation of responsibility for combining description of both steps, the marking and recovery methods. Since it appears that the present project has the ultimate responsibility for analysis of the objectives specified, are we to assume that the progress report of this project will include both?

The ISRP qualifies this fundable recommendation suggesting that this program (Umatilla Program) is too complex to adequately review in an annual process and needs a more intensive review including a site visit, and presentation and discussion of results. Such a site review should be comprehensive enough to include an assessment of program goals and measurable objectives, results to date based on whether the program is leading to increased natural production (preliminary data to date do not show this is happening), design and structure of M&E program, and importance of entire O&M elements. Also, there is need to show how co-manager's programs are working together (or at least in communication).

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