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Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199803100: Implement Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kis

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized Laura Gephart

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199803100
Proposal Name: Implement Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kis
BPA Project Manager: Linda Hermeston
Agency, Institution or Organization: Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC)
Short Description: This project will provide effective and efficient watershed restoration through coordination and support of tribal restoration planning and project implementation consistent with Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit and the NWPCC Fish and Wildlife Program.
Information Transfer: A magazine highlighting CRITFC tribal success stories of salmon restoration will be published along with numerous brochures and distributed widely. CRITFC Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund project data will be continually updated and available at www.critfc.org, and at www.nwr.noaa.gov/. Eventually tribal BPA project data will also be available at www.critfc.org.
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
Laura Gephart Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 729 NE Oregon St., Suite 200
Portland OR 97232
Ph: 503.238.0667
Fax: 503.235.4228
Email: gepl@critfc.org
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Laura Gephart Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 729 NE Oregon St., Suite 200
Portland OR 97232
Ph: 503.238.0667
Fax: 503.235.4228
Email: gepl@critfc.org
Contract Manager
Anita Nez Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 729 NE Oregon St Suite 200
Portland OR 97232
Ph: 503.731.1270
Fax: ..
Email: neza@critfc.org
Technical Contact
Jaime Pinkham Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 729 NE Oregon St., Suite 200
Portland OR 97232
Ph: 503.238.0667
Fax: 503.235.4228
Email: pinj@critfc.org
Supervisor
Dolores Rodriguez Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission 729 NE Oregon, 200
Portland, OR 97232
Ph: 503 238-0667
Fax:
Email: rodd@critfc.org
Administrative Contact

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Mainstem/Systemwide ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Systemwide ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
The project area covers all of the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe, the Yakama Nation, the Umatilla Tribe and the Warm Springs Tribe. , None Selected No

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
All Anadromous Fish
Other Anadromous
Pacific Lamprey
All Resident Fish

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Assisted with tribes/CRITFC in the PSC Southern Fund project selection process resulting in four funded projects. Created, printed and distributed 2000 PCSRF tribal restoration calendars. Coordinated 154 PCSRF projects (103 completed), at $13.4 million.
2004 Coordinated 102 tribal PCSRF projects at $11.5 million. Conducted site tours of 20 projects. Created PCSRF brochure and distributed widely. Coordinated PCSRF Science Review Team to review PCSRF proposals. Expanded PCSRF and BPA GIS database.
2003 Planned and workshop with the USACE and tribes to discuss potential funding opportunities (60 participants). Conducted fish contamination workshop with the tribes. Organized a tribal PCSRFworkshop with presentations by other potential funders.
2002 Organized a meeting and tour of the Haggerman facility in Idaho for NWPCC members. Supported submitted tribal BPA project proposals through the ISRP and CBFWA review processes. Implemented 31 tribal PCSRF projects resulting in 68 projects total.
2001 Organized the 2001 Tribal Water Quality Conference in Warms Springs, OR. Produced and distributed 2000 copies of Tribal Restoration Calendar. Drafted Cultural Assessment Methodology for watersheds with the Umatilla Tribe. Involved in Jammin for Salmon.
2000 Conducted Watershed Assessment Forums to assess feasibility of developing a standarized regional watershed assessment methodology. Organized 2000 Tribal Water Quality Conference in Spokane, WA. Trained Salmon Corps members in watershed asssessments.
1999 Wrote technical paper on Umatilla Basin Project and published in scientific journal. Established Spirit of the Salmon Fund within CRITFC to raise funds for tribal restoration projects. Participated and led regional discussions on subbasin planning.
1998 Coordinated Inter-Tribal watershed project development. Created and published Watershed Restoration Handbook and distributed 2,000 copies. Created brochures highlighting tribal projects. Organized Inter-Tribal Habitat & Production workshops.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
PCSRF - CRITFC 2000-5-01 Coordination of the Pacific Co The PCSRF Coordination project is a cost-share project for this BPA project.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2001-5-01 Coordination of the Pacific Co The PCSRF Coordination project is a cost-share project for this BPA project.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2002-5-02 Coordination of the Pacific Co Cost-share
PCSRF - CRITFC 2003-5-05 Coordination of the Pacific Co Cost-share.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2004-5-05 Coordination of the Pacific Co Cost-share.
PCSRF - CRITFC 2005-5-04 Coordination of the Pacific Co Cost-share.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
2000 Fish and Wildlife Program Appdx. D Protect and restore freshwater habitat for all life history stages of the key species. Protect and increase ecological connectivity between aquatic areas, riparian zones, floodplains and uplands. None Identify the current condition and biological potential of the habitat, and then protect or restore it to the extent described in the biological objective (taken from the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program). 25
Overarching Objectives Surfficient populations of fish and wildlife for abundant opportunities for tribal trust and treaty right harvest adn for non-tribal harvest. None Restore ecosystems, not just single species (taken from 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program). 26

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Coordination Coordination Objective 1. Provide assistance to CRITFC’s four member tribes on all regional salmon recovery processes. Track and provide assistance to the four member tribes on all regional processes of BPA, NWPCC, CBFWA and NOAA Fisheries such as the implementation and tracking of tribally sponsored watershed protection and restoration projects, FCRPS Biological Opinion, implementation of subbasin plans, subbasin plan roll-up, implementation of salmon recovery plans, identifying linkages between the different processes in the Columbia Basin, and on cost share/partnership opportunities. CRITFC staff will continue to participate in all monthly NWPCC and CBFWA meetings and ensure that tribal concerns are addressed. Staff will attend meetings on the FCRPS Biological Opinion through the Collaboration process, Federal Executive meetings, salmon recovery, PNAMP meetings, PCSRF and PSC meetings, and participate in other relevant forums with federal, state and local officials. CRITFC staff will meet on a regular basis with tribal staff either at the CRITFC or at their respective reservation to provide administrative and management assistance to the tribes’ fisheries programs to coordinate efforts and make sure the tribes’ restoration needs are being met. Maintenance of cooperative relationships between the CRITFC tribes and the co-managers of natural resources in the Columbia Basin will be evidenced by, among other things, development and implementation of collaborative proposals, productive interaction between the parties and continued improvement in communication and information exchange. Objective 2. Provide comprehensive coordination and tracking of tribally sponsored watershed protection & restoration projects to ensure timely on-the-ground project implementation within each subbasin. CRITFC will provide coordination between tribes and project cooperators to insure anadromous fish restoration projects are integrated within the subbasin and consistent with Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit fish habitat objectives for the subbasin, NWPCC Fish and Wildlife Program, and NOAA Fisheries salmon recovery plans. CRITFC will be in regular communication with the tribes and subbasin cooperators to identify and clarify, at the technical and policy levels, that overall goals and objectives for the subbasins are being met by coordinated actions and efforts in the subbasin. Provide assistance in the implementation and monitoring of prioritized projects identified in the subbasin plans. CRITFC will continue to coordinate the PCSRF for the member tribes by applying for annual funding, writing and amending subcontracts with the tribes, implementing projects, financial management, submitting progress reports to NOAA Fisheries, assisting in the project selection process, conducting site visits, creating PCSRF publications and adhering to audit compliance measures. A database with detailed data on all tribal and CRITFC PCSRF projects will be maintained. CRITFC staff will assist the tribes in the packaging and managing of comprehensive project proposals through the NWPCC Fish and Wildlife program peer review process, CBFWA review process, BPA contracting process, the PCSRF and PSC Southern Fund project selection process, and through other potential funding opportunities. CRITFC staff will attend and advocate for tribal projects in NWPPC, CBFWA, ISRP and PCSRF and PSC forums. Periodic meetings with affected tribal fishery managers and subbasin cooperators will be scheduled to review projects status and results (approximately 25 meetings will be conducted per year). Staff will continue to conduct telephone, e- mail, and on-site visits with tribes and project cooperators to discuss and coordinate projects. Objective 3. Promote cost-sharing of subbasin watershed projects with tribal, federal, state, local and private agencies, organizations and individuals by identifying and coordinating funding and implementation opportunities. CRITFC will organize between 10-20 new contacts annually with key personnel from funding agencies and tribal staffs to discuss opportunities for cost share. CRITFC will organize an annual workshop for tribal staff and invite potential private and government entities to assist in developing grant proposals. CRITFC will monitor the increase in tribal non-BPA funding requests and projects eventually funded in each subbasin. Staff will continue work with the NOAA Fisheries for funding of tribal restoration projects through the PCSRF and the PSC Southern Fund. CRITFC will collaborate with other agencies, discuss congressional allocations with senators and representatives and staff, support funding of complimentary programs in state funding processes, also meeting with tribes to review and assess needs for purposes of project development. A list of projects will be developed in conjunction with each tribe for which cost-share would be beneficial. Funds will be applied for in conjunction with the Spirit of the Salmon Fund at CRITFC. Staff will conduct research on private foundations for potential funding opportunities and organize informational meetings. Publications demonstrating salmon recovery efforts by the member tribes will be distributed at public meetings, at meetings with delegations in Washington D.C., and at regional fish meetings. Work Element Title: Outreach and Education Work Category: Planning and Coordination Work Element ID: 99 Work Element Description: Covers work to educate or communicate with the public. Includes conducting classess, seminars, workshops, training, symposia, and conferences. Objective 1. Publish and distribute public outreach materials on tribal salmon restoration efforts. CRITFC will produce publications describing the tribal successes in watershed protection, restoration, and supplementation, and the challenges of tribally sponsored salmon restoration efforts in the Columbia River Basin. Publications will include 1) brochures on the tribal PCSRF projects, and on tribal salmon recovery projects in general (Estimated 500 copies will be distributed), 2) a magazine and calendar highlighting tribal salmon restoration work (Estimated 2000 copies of each will be distributed), 3) GIS maps of tribal restoration projects accessible to all subbasin cooperators, and 4)fact sheets and articles. All of these efforts will promote opportunities for local partnerships Staff will distribute materials regionally and nationally to tribal partners and potential partners in new efforts, and at public events such as the annual Oxbow Village Festival and the CRITFC Salmon Gala. The CRITFC website will be frequently updated to reflect tribal efforts. The PCSRF and BPA database and GIS mapping all tribal project information will be maintained and expanded using CRITFC’s GIS workstations. The information will be available either on-line of on CD ROM to all subbasin cooperators. Objective 2. Assist tribes & subbasin cooperators with public outreach through community based meetings, workshops, and field tours of on-the- ground projects. CRITFC will provide information, outreach publications, and staff time to assist tribal staff in public outreach to partners in watershed and subbasin planning. Staff will organize and participate in forums (at least 4) interacting with the public, management partners and other river users (such as hydro power utilities and customers) to generate common understanding and to promote tribal restoration projects and the good science behind the tribal restoration plan Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit. CRITFC staff will coordinate field tours of tribal projects for NWPPC members, BPA officials, CBFWA partners, public officials, educators, other river users, and potential funders (Estimated 4 tours). Objective 3. Promote incorporation of standards in Tribal Restoration Handbook in watershed projects. Encourage the implementation of the Cultural Resources Assessment Methodology into salmon recovery projects. CRITFC staff will promote the use of watershed restoration priorities as described in the Tribal Restoration Handbook Staff will disseminate scientifically reviewed watershed restoration handbook (up to 50 copies yearly), and make presentations to watershed councils and subbasin planners. Staff will seek incorporation of standards in new planning efforts through meeting with planners and public promotion. CRITFC staff will also promote the use of the Cultural Assessment Methodology Guidebook produced by the Umatilla Tribe under this project. The public will be sensitive to tribal resource concerns through this outreach. 7/1/2007 6/30/2010 $334,800
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Outreach and Education Outreach and Education Objective 1. Publish and distribute public outreach materials on tribal salmon restoration efforts. CRITFC will produce publications describing the tribal successes in watershed protection, restoration, and supplementation, and the challenges of tribally sponsored salmon restoration efforts in the Columbia River Basin. Publications will include 1) brochures on the tribal PCSRF projects, and on tribal salmon recovery projects in general (Estimated 500 copies will be distributed), 2) a magazine and calendar highlighting tribal salmon restoration work (Estimated 2000 copies of each will be distributed), 3) GIS maps of tribal restoration projects accessible to all subbasin cooperators, and 4)fact sheets and articles. All of these efforts will promote opportunities for local partnerships Staff will distribute materials regionally and nationally to tribal partners and potential partners in new efforts, and at public events such as the annual Oxbow Village Festival and the CRITFC Salmon Gala. The CRITFC website will be frequently updated to reflect tribal efforts. The PCSRF and BPA database and GIS mapping all tribal project information will be maintained and expanded using CRITFC’s GIS workstations. The information will be available either on-line of on CD ROM to all subbasin cooperators. Objective 2. Assist tribes & subbasin cooperators with public outreach through community based meetings, workshops, and field tours of on-the- ground projects. CRITFC will provide information, outreach publications, and staff time to assist tribal staff in public outreach to partners in watershed and subbasin planning. Staff will organize and participate in forums (at least 4) interacting with the public, management partners and other river users (such as hydro power utilities and customers) to generate common understanding and to promote tribal restoration projects and the good science behind the tribal restoration plan Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit. CRITFC staff will coordinate field tours of tribal projects for NWPPC members, BPA officials, CBFWA partners, public officials, educators, other river users, and potential funders (Estimated 4 tours). Objective 3. Promote incorporation of standards in Tribal Restoration Handbook in watershed projects. Encourage the implementation of the Cultural Resources Assessment Methodology into salmon recovery projects. CRITFC staff will promote the use of watershed restoration priorities as described in the Tribal Restoration Handbook Staff will disseminate scientifically reviewed watershed restoration handbook (up to 50 copies yearly), and make presentations to watershed councils and subbasin planners. Staff will seek incorporation of standards in new planning efforts through meeting with planners and public promotion. CRITFC staff will also promote the use of the Cultural Assessment Methodology Guidebook produced by the Umatilla Tribe under this project. The public will be sensitive to tribal resource concerns through this outreach. 7/1/2007 6/30/2010 $134,400
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Provide Technical Review Provide Technical Review Objective 1. Implementation of scientifically sound watershed projects and promoting land management strategies which protect anadromous fish habitats within subbasins. CRITFC staff under this proposal will coordinate and participate on the CRITFC Technical Advisory Team (a scientific technical team including fisheries scientists, hydrologists, watershed and water quality scientists) to assist tribal/subbasin project sponsors and implementers in developing projects and standards for watershed restoration projects are consistent with Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit. Staff will provide technical reviews of proposed projects by the tribes and CRITFC under the PCSRF and PSC Southern Fund process. They will ensure that actions are consistent with subbasin habitat restoration efforts and Wy-Kan Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit. Staff will provide technical support to tribes and subbasin cooperators to assure federal, state, and private land managers implement accountable management plans consistent with the biological needs of fish, their habitats, and fishery management goals. Staff will continue regular communications with tribes and project partners to identify technical assistance needs and priorities. They will continue to conduct telephone, e-mail, and on-site visitations with tribes and project cooperators to discuss and coordinate projects. Staff will provide assistance in identifying and applying for funding for technical needs in conjunction with the Spirit of the Salmon Fund at CRITFC. Staff will provide coordination services and information regarding past and current projects occurring in the watershed where new activities are planned (see task 1.c.), review project in context of others in the watershed for compatibility of goals and methods. 7/1/2007 6/30/2010 $60,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Annual Report Produce Annual Report Work Element Title: Produce Status Report Work Category: Reporting Work Element ID: 141 Work Element Description: Reporting of the status of the milestones in each project. Objective 1. Continue the administration, management, and budget tracking of expenses for BPA Project # 1998-031-00 “Implement Wy-Kan-Ush-Mi Wa-Kish-Wit Watershed Assessment and Restoration Plan Now”. CRITFC staff will track budget expenditures by task and expense category to ensure adequate accountability and timely task completion and complete all grant reporting requirements for quarterly and annual reports 7/1/2007 6/30/2010 $16,815
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Create/Manage/Maintain Database Manage/Maintan Database Work Element Title: Manage/Maintain Database Work Category: RM&E and Data Management Work Element ID: 160 Work Element Description: Any work that maintains or improves the security, quality, accessibility, or utility of data in a structured database. Objective 1. Maintain a project tracking database for tribal subbasin projects to monitor project implementation, fiscal management, local and regional project coordination, and overall results within subbasins of concern. The Watershed Department will continue to maintain and expand the PCSRF database to include all tribal watershed projects for use by tribes, staff and the public in tracking, reviewing, and locating cost-shares for BPA projects, Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund projects, and projects with other agencies. This database will be periodically updated as projects or milestones are completed. The database contains information about submittal and approval of proposals and contracts, project leaders and cooperators, project locations and activities, and current project status. Further, queries will be created to examine data on entire subbasins, project sponsors, fiscal expenditures, regional review status, and compilation and summary of subbasin results and effectiveness. An annual status report highlighting overall annual and accrued results for each subbasin will be prepared for review and use by the tribes, subbasin cooperators, NWPPC, and BPA. Staff will expand the GIS mapping of tribal restoration project locations throughout the Columbia River Basin. 7/1/2007 6/30/2010 $156,600
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel Three FTEs employed. $112,880 $112,880 $112,880
Fringe Benefits For 1.75 FTEs. $36,686 $36,686 $36,686
Supplies Includes postage, phone/fax,registrations,office supplies $4,000 $4,000 $4,000
Travel Travel to all NWPCC, CBFWA, 13 Tribes,..meetings $16,500 $16,500 $16,500
Capital Equipment Computers $3,000 $3,000 $3,000
Overhead Indirect rate of 35.95% $61,139 $61,139 $61,139
Totals $234,205 $234,205 $234,205

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$702,615
Total Work Element budget$702,615

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status
BIA Cost-share $20,000 $20,000 $20,000 Cash Under Review
Pacific Salmon Commission Southern Fund Cost-share $18,000 $18,000 $18,000 Cash Under Review
PCSRF Cost-share $125,000 $125,000 $125,000 Cash Under Review
Totals $163,000 $163,000 $163,000

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$262,300 $270,200 Outyear budget will provide funding for ongoing coordination as outlined in this proposal.
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
 
Termination Date Comments
None This is an ongoing coordination proposal to assist CRITFC member tribes in working with the NWPCC and BPA to satisfy tribal trust adn treaty rights obligations.
 
Final Deliverables
Final report will be prepared. Database and maps will be shared with subbasin planners and tribal fish and wildlife partners within the Basin.

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$210,000
FY 2008 Budget
$210,000
FY 2009 Budget
$210,000
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:Basinwide
Recommendation:Under Review
Comments: Final funding recommendation pending further review. See 'regional coordination placeholder' below and see discussion of regional coordination funding in the programmatic recommendations.


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$210,000
FY 2008 Budget
$210,000
FY 2009 Budget
$210,000
Total NPCC Rec
$630,000
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$210,000
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$210,000
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$210,000
Total MSRT Rec
$630,000
Budget Category:Basinwide
Comments: Interim funding pending further Council review of the appropriate coordination activities. Council draft recommendation is an interim budget level that represented the MSRT recommendation. Council requests a recommendation from staff in October 06 re tasks, deliverables.

Local or MSRT Comments: The project should be funded at FY 2006 levels, plus a slight (5%) increase due to increased costs. The proposal should provide the same level of accountability in reporting as the CBFWA project (sign in sheets, meeting summaries, etc.).


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: CRITFC provided helpful answers to many ISRP comments. The response concerning outreach was well done. The list of over 150 completed or ongoing projects is impressive. However, no lists of technical reports or data resulting from these projects could be provided because of the "limited time frame." It is surprising that CRITFC does not routinely have this information available.

Better evaluation and documentation of the effectiveness of previous coordination efforts and project implementation in the form of feedback from the four Tribes and other agencies could help CRITFC to identify those activities that have been most effective and to prioritize future efforts. But overall, the response misses the point and does not address the ISRP’s comments on the need for better self-evaluation and monitoring of CRITFC activities.

The statement: "It is impossible to clearly state what the most effective activities are" is disconcerting in a coordination project, and can only true if no attempts to evaluate effectiveness are made. Approval of projects by the CRITFC Commission does not constitute an evaluation. The sponsors need to take a more proactive approach to learn how to conduct an effectiveness evaluation and to conduct it. At present, effectiveness is asserted rather than documented. Responses #12 and 16 address some potential indicators of effectiveness, but these remain assertions rather than demonstrations of effectiveness.

If it is the case (response #12) that "Effectiveness may well be measured by the success of preserving the tribal institutional capacity and leadership to deliver on-the-ground projects, collaboration to make shared decisions with state and federal co-managers on key policy issues, participation in forums that shape future actions by BPA and other federal entities that oversee the operation of the hydrosystem, and education and outreach to build and sustain partnerships," the elements of this statement provide guidance as to the types of indicators that would be appropriate to assess performance.

Response 17 also addresses the effectiveness evaluation issue. Stating, "As already agreed to by the ISRP, monitoring of coordination effectiveness is difficult to evaluate quantitatively" is again missing the point. Although it is difficult, it is both desirable and possible. The point is that careful thought should be given to what effectiveness would look like and how it can be measured, then develop a plan to measure it and evaluate it. Agreeing to "document any incidences of overlap or redundancy with CRITFC and individual tribal projects if they occur as a measure of effectiveness" is not sufficient and does not address the central question of effectiveness.

The response provides no indication of a prioritized approach to planning. Planning is apparently entirely reactive to short-term priorities expressed by CRITFC members. Response 15 describes some of the elements of consideration in coordination but does not explain the process of prioritization.

The recommended qualification to funding is that the sponsors be required to develop an effectiveness evaluation plan.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Response requested
NPCC Comments: The proposal is to implement the fish and wildlife programs of the Columbia River Treaty Tribes as coordinated through CRITFC. It provides a clear description of the role of the treaty tribes and the need for coordination among them. Without coordination there might be overlap and discontinuity of activities within and between the Tribal F&W departments. Extensive rationale is provided relating this proposal with the objectives of the Fish and Wildlife Program, BiOp, US v. Oregon, CBFWA, Pacific Salmon Treaty, PCSRF, PNAMP, and NOAA Fisheries Recovery planning. The proposal does a good job of specifically identifying CRITFC’s role in relation to each of these. Interactions between the CRITFC watershed group and PCSRF, PSC, PNAMP and individual projects are clearly described.

A project history enumerates a long list of accomplishments related to coordination, watershed assessments, proposal assistance, cost sharing, M&E guidelines, Salmon Corps, and Outreach. Reflecting earlier ISRP comments, there are clearly many good coordination activities being conducted through this project, but the proposal, and especially the project history, lacks evaluative content. How were decisions made as to where to focus efforts? What activities are the most effective? What challenges face these coordination efforts? How are they addressed? The proposal would be strengthened by this type of evaluation of the effectiveness of previous actions.

The project has a number of objectives related to implementation of the fish and wildlife program: coordination, outreach and education, technical review, database management, and report writing. Methods described for each objective seem reasonable; however, some are too generally written to understand what is entailed. For example:

• "Watershed Department staff participates in the development of a Framework for Performance Measures/Indicators for the PCSRF projects" - What methods were used to develop this framework and is it working?

• "So far under the PCSRF for FY 2000-2003, some of the progresses the tribes have made include: 442 stream miles restored, 1977 acres acquired and protected, 34 fish passage barriers removed, and 178 miles of riparian plantings" - Under guidance from CRITFC, are the Tribes using a quantitative method to forecast improvements in fish survival?

• "Methods under this proposal will be adapted as the NWPPC, CBFWA, and 13 Tribes processes evolve." - Can this statement be made more specific?

M&E is a big missing component of this proposal. Methods for assessing successful coordination as it translates to benefits to fish and wildlife need to be developed and used. Earlier ISRP comments recommended that the project would be improved by taking a more targeted approach to implementation. This would involve developing priorities. It also recommended a plan to monitor project effectiveness. How else will the project determine if it is being effective or if there are areas of possible improvement?

The narrative states under Objective 1 "Maintenance of cooperative relationships between the CRITFC tribes and the co-managers of natural resources in the Columbia Basin will be evidenced by, among other things, development and implementation of collaborative proposals, productive interaction between the parties and continued improvement in communication and information exchange." These may be suitable metrics to assess coordination success, but the proposal should present a definitive provision to actually monitor them. The proponents could also gather biological data (e.g., escapements, productivity, abundance) from the various Tribes and synthesize them annually as a contribution toward monitoring the streams under their purview.

Effectiveness of a coordinating entity such as CRITFC is sometimes difficult to assess quantitatively. Adaptive management and review of past activities may be one way of moving ahead. As suggested in the last ISRP review, CRITFC should develop evaluation methods or perform a literature review to find out what similar agencies do to assess effectiveness of their coordination activities. Measures of effectiveness might include observations on themes such as reduction in overlap, number of collaborative projects with Tribal fishery biologists resulting in peer reviewed papers, and biological improvements such as increases in smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for salmonids returning to streams managed by the Tribes.

Despite the good narrative descriptions contained in the proposal, more specific details are needed. More could be done to present examples of CRITFC coordination by adding information from the attachment “CRITFC Success under the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund” to the proposal narrative.

In addition, sponsors are requested to provide more detailed information addressing the areas listed below:

• Tabulation of the numerous collaborative projects done under the auspices of CRITFC. This table could include a column of the technical reports or data resulting from the work.

• Methods used to prioritize coordination activities.

• Methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of coordination.

• Information on effectiveness monitoring; how the evaluation procedure could be improved.

• The relation of funded projects to benefits for fish and wildlife.

• Potential for information transfer among CRITFC members to be enhanced by electronic means, such as an electronic newsletter to provide more timely information and coordination.

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