FY 2007 Solicitation Homepage

Project Proposal Request for FY 2007 - FY 2009 Funding

Proposal 199402600: Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project

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Table of Contents
Part 1. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative
Section 2: Project Location
Section 3: Project Species
Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Section 5: Relationship to Other Projects
Section 6: Biological Objectives
Section 7: Work Elements
Section 8: Budget
Section 9: Project Future
Section 10: Documents
Part 2. Reviews
Part 1 of 2. Administration and Budgeting
Section 1: General Administrative Information
Process Information:
Date Proposal Submitted & Finalized Status Form Generator
January 10, 2006 Finalized David Close
DB Administrator's Note [Primary contact changed to David Close by request on 7/12/1006 - DBA]

Proposal Type: Ongoing
Proposal Number: 199402600
Proposal Name: Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project
BPA Project Manager: Deborah Docherty
Agency, Institution or Organization: Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation
Short Description: The purpose of this study is to provide the critical information to restore Pacific lampreys Lampetra tridentata in the Umatilla River that is called for in the Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan.
Information Transfer: Publish results in peer-reviewed journals
 
Project Proposal Contacts
Contact Organization Address Phone/Email Roles Notes
Form Submitter
David Close CTUIR 13 Natural Resource building
East Lansing, Michigan, 48823
Ph: 517-432-1141
Fax: [left blank]
Email: closedav@msu.edu
Form Submitter
All Assigned Contacts
Jeanette Howard Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reserva 73239 Confederated Way
Pendleton, OR 97801
Ph: 541-966-2387
Fax: 541-276-4348
Email: jeanettehoward@ctuir.com
Form Submitter

Section 2: Project Location
Sponsor Province: Columbia Plateau ARG Province: No Change
Sponsor Subbasin: Umatilla ARG Subbasin: No Change
Location(s) at which the action will be implemented
Latitude Longitude Waterbody Location Description County/State Subbasin Primary?
strean The Umatilla River mainstem and tributaries Umatilla, Oregon Umatilla Yes

Section 3: Focal Species
Focal Species:
Primary Secondary Additional Species
Pacific Lamprey
River Lamprey

Section 4: Past Accomplishments
Past Accomplishments for Each Fiscal Year of This Project
Fiscal Year Accomplishments
2005 Outplanted spawning ready adults into the Umatilla River. Estimated larval lamprey densities. Estimated the number juvenile outmigrants. Identified stress steroids in lamprey. Began radio telemetry to understand spawning migration behavior and passage e
2004 Outplanted spawning ready adults into the Umatilla River. Estimated larval lamprey densities. Estimated the number juvenile outmigrants. Identified stress steroids in lamprey.
2003 Outplanted spawning ready adults into the Umatilla River. Estimated larval lamprey densities. Estimated the number juvenile outmigrants. Determined adult lamprey spawning habitat requirements. Identified stress steroids in lamprey.
2002 Outplanted spawning ready adults into the Umatilla River. Estimated larval lamprey densities. Estimated the number juvenile outmigrants. Calculated habitat preference curves for larvae. Determine which known bile acids are produced and excreted by lam
2001 Outplanted spawning ready adults into the Umatilla River. Estimated larval lamprey densities. Estimated the number juvenile outmigrants. Examine sensitivity of upstream migrating lamprey to bile salts.
2000 Began outplanting adults into Umatilla River to increase larval densities. Conducted larval habitat modeling in the Middle Fork John Day.
1999 Completed: genetic analysis using allozyme and mtdna; radio-tracking study to assess migrational behavoir; status surveys in the John Day, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Tucannon, and Grande Ronde rivers; restoration plan for the Umatilla River, Oregon.
1998 Began development of Umatilla Basin lamprey restoration plan. Assessment of past and current lamprey abundance in NE Oregon subbasins. Completed assessment of ability of adult Pacific lampreys to detect pheromones and larval production of pheromones.
1997 Completed sampling for Columbia Basin lamprey genetic database. Completed assessment of radio-tagged Pacific lampreys using clinical indicators and swimming performance.
1996 Assessment of radio tag use for lamprey. Tested clinical indicators of stress in Pacific lamrpeys.
1995 Status report of lamprey in Columbia Basin.

Section 5: Relationships to Other Projects
Other Current Projects Related to this Project (any funding source)
Funding Source Related ID Related Project Title Relationship
BPA 198343600 Umatilla Passage O&M Improvements made for salmonid passage may benefit Pacific lamprey.
BPA 198710001 Umatilla Anad Fish Hab - CTUIR Habitat improvements made for salmonids in the Umatilla Basin may benefit Pacific lamprey.
BPA 198902700 Power Repay Umatilla Basin Pro The results of our studies have provided details on the timing of the lamprey spawning migration. This information can be used to inform the power repay project in the basin.
BPA 199000500 Umatilla Hatchery - M&E Pacific lamprey are reared at CTUIR acclimation facilities.
BPA 199000501 Umatilla Basin Nat Prod M&E Research and monitoring conducted under the Umatilla Basin Nat. Production Project are shared with the Lamprey Project and vice versa. The CTUIR programs inform eachother.
BPA 200203700 Freshwater Mussels In River CTUIR staff work closely with both projects as both freshwater mussels and lamprey require similar habitat and perform similar ecosystem functions.

Section 6: Biological Objectives
Biological Objectives of this Proposed Project
Biological Objective Full Description Associated Subbasin Plan Strategy Page Nos
Collaboration and Communication Maximize effectiveness of Umatilla Subbasin RM&E projects with collaborative study planning and implementation, synthesis of results, and results dissemination. Umatilla The project maximizes the effectiveness of Umatilla Subbasin RM&E projects by collaborating with other Umatilla River studies and projects, as well as in other subbasins, through planning and implementation, synthesis of results, and disseminating results 5-6
Fisheries Maintain and enhance tribal and non-tribal steelhead, Chinook, coho and lamprey fisheries compatible with production, population, and conservation objectives. Umatilla Since the project’s initiation in 1994, the long-term goal of the project has been to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable levels. That goal continues to this day and 5-5
Natural Production Maintain and enhance natural production, productivity, abundance, life history characteristics and genetic diversity of fish and mussels throughout the Umatilla Basin using habitat protection and improvement. Umatilla The project seeks to maintain and enhance natural production, productivity, and abundance throughout in the Umatilla Basin by improving passage efficiency of adult Pacific lamprey. 5-5
Natural Production Maintain, augment, and enhance natural production, productivity, abundance, life history characteristics and genetic diversity of steelhead, Chinook, coho, and lamprey throughout the Umatilla Basin using hatchery supplementation and out-planting. Umatilla The project continues to maintain, augment and enhance natural production, productivity, and abundance of Pacific lamprey by supplementing lamprey populations with spawning ready outplants. 5-5
Population and Environmental Status Monitor the status and trends of fish and mussel populations, their habitats and ecosystems throughout the Umatilla Basin. Umatilla CTUIR’s Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project continues to monitor the status and trends of lamprey (in all life stages) in the Umatilla Basin. 5-4

Section 7: Work Elements
Work Elements and Associated Biological Objectives
Work Element Name Work Element Title Description Start Date End Date Estimated Budget
Produce Environmental Compliance Documentation Provide Environmental Compliance documentation for lamprey project (CTUIR) Provide BPA Environmental Compliance Group with information necessary to support a categorical exclusion for all project activities 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $3,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Operate and Maintain Habitat/Passage Modify and/or develop structures to improve passage success of adult Pacific lamprey in the Umatilla River. Based on the radiotelemetry results from the first year, we will identify the structures with the lowest lamprey passage efficiency. Each of these sites will be fitted with a low-elevation ramp to allow lamprey to pass over. This approach has been used with success to pass lamprey at much higher elevation structures (Moser et al. 2005). In some cases, it may be possible to breach or notch structures to allow lamprey to pass. This work will be coordinated under the Umatilla Basin Plan with dam owners/operators. Radiotelemetry in the last two years (described in Objective 3) will be used to monitor lamprey passage success after modifications are made. Passage efficiency of lamprey before and after the modifications will be compared to assess their efficacy. 1/1/2008 12/31/2009 $75,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Natural Production
No Metrics for this Work Element

Spawn Fish Release sexually mature adult Pacific lamprey into Umatilla River (CTUIR) Outplant spawning phase adult lampreys (up to 500) into the Umatilla River watershed, at specific sites in the Umatilla River, Meacham Creek and Iskuulpa Creek to increase larval abundance. Outplantings began in 2000 and have continued annually. 4/1/2007 12/31/2009 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Natural Production
No Metrics for this Work Element

Trap/Collect/Hold/Transport Fish - Hatchery Collect Pacific Lamprey for radio tracking experiment (CTUIR) The scope of this work is to monitor the movement of Pacific lamprey in the Umatilla River during the spawning migration. To do this we must collect lamprey for a radio tagging experiment. We will collect up to 100 adult lamprey for radio tagging experiment. The number actually collected depends on the number caught at the dam. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $75,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Natural Production
No Metrics for this Work Element

Trap/Collect/Hold/Transport Fish - Hatchery Trap/Collect/Hold adult Pacific lampreys (CTUIR) Successfully collect (at Bonneville, The Dalles and John Day dams), transport, and hold (at South Fork Walla Walla or Minthorn Springs hatcheries) up to 500 adult Pacific lamprey (depending on numbers available from dams) until lamprey are ready to spawn. The number of individuals collected and held depends on the numbers that are available at mainstem dams. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $210,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
Natural Production
No Metrics for this Work Element

Manage and Administer Projects Project Management for lamprey project (CTUIR) Manage project logistics, field activities and subcontractors. Provide administrative support for all project activities and to meet BPA requirements such as metrics reporting, financial reporting (e.g. accruals), invoicing and development of FY06 SOW and related documents. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $45,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Outreach and Education Educate and inform the public about the Lamprey Research and Restoration Project (CTUIR) The purpose of this work is to educate the Tribal community, the public at large and the scientific community about the Lamprey Research and Restoration Project. We will make professional presentations and class presentations (via oral and visual presentations, hands-on training exhibits, field training classes, etc.) 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $35,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce Annual Report Produce annual report for lamprey project (CTUIR) We will complete an annual report to the funding agency with results of our work element milestones. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $15,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Produce/Submit Scientific Findings Report Publish results of Pacific lamprey studies (CTUIR) We will submit our findings from our various work elements to peer reviewed journals for publication. We expect to publish the results of our research as 1-3 papers in peer-reviewed, scientific journals. We have identified the following possible journals: Northwest Scientist, Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, and/or the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $10,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Analyze/Interpret Data Analyze lamprey movement during spawning migration (CTUIR) Movements of radio-tagged lamprey will be tracked using a portable receiver from a vehicle or aircraft. In addition, an array of fixed-site receiving stations will be positioned at the mouth of the Umatilla River and at each structure of interest (Three Mile Dam and other low-elevation structures). Receiving stations will have a scanning receiver with either a Yagi aerial antenna or a digital spectrum processor and one or more underwater coaxial cable antennas. Data will downloaded every 1-2 weeks and transmitted electronically to an existing database housed at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, WA. In addition, mobile tracking transects will be conducted at least weekly during the summer and monthly thereafter. The passage efficiency (number of lamprey that pass over of those that approach each structure) will be determined for each structure in addition to the route of passage and the amount of time lamprey required to complete each segment of their migration. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $68,124
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Analyze/Interpret Data Estimate larval lamprey population sizes in the Umatilla River. (CTUIR) From the data collected through the capturing of larval and metamorphosed data, we can estimate population sizes through statistical analysis. These estimates can then be converted to density measurements (# / m2) for the Umatilla River. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $15,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Analyze/Interpret Data Estimate trap efficiencies for capturing Pacific lamprey (CTUIR) Through our efforts to estimate the number of larval and metamorphosed outmigrating lamprey, and adult spawning upmigrants in the Umatilla River, we will test the efficiency of our trapping efforts by analyzing our mark and recapture data. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $10,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Determine the structure and profile of migratory and sex pheromones in larval and sexually mature Pacific lamprey. We will identify possible migratory and sex pheromones in larval and sexually mature Pacific lamprey and conduct a behavioral assay specific to the migratory and sex pheromones. We will use a phased approach in our investigation. In the first phase we will conduct experiments designed to examine migratory and sex pheromone production in larval and spermiating Pacific lampreys. In the second phase, tests will be conducted with the identified pheromones in a two choice maze in the Umatilla River. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $121,450
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Estimate larval lamprey densities in the Umatilla River (CTUIR) he scope of this work element is to continue monitoring the number of larval and metamorphosed lamprey in the upper reaches of the Umatilla River. Before outplantings started in 2000, we obtained estimates of larval densities at 33 index sites beginning in 1998. This provides us with population estimates before and after the outplanting broodstock program began, and allows us to monitor and quantify the success of the project. At 33 index sites, electroshock using 2 or 3 pass methodology in 7.5 m2 plats and measure 20% of larvae to nearest mm and seigh to nearest mg. ID as larval or metamorphosed. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $120,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Estimate the number of adult lamprey migrating into the Umatilla River and John Day This work will continue efforts to estimate the number of adult spawning migrants into the Umatilla and John Day rivers. Using pot traps and portable assessment traps, we will capture and individually mark lamprey, and measure to nearest mm and weigh to nearest mg, all captured lamprey. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $120,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Estimate the number of outmigrating lamprey in the Umatilla River. (CTUIR) The scope of this work is to estimate the number of larval and metamorphosed lamprey migrating out of the Umatilla River. Before outplanting broodstock began in 2000, we obtained estimates of larval densities, and the number of outmigrants and upmigrants into the Umatilla River. The number of outmigrating lampreys is a measure of larval production in the Umatilla River. CTUIR will operate a rotary screw trap at Threemile Dam (24/7) from November-April to enumerate and fin clip outmigrating lamprey. Collect discharge, temperature and turbidity data. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $150,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Collect/Generate/Validate Field and Lab Data Monitor spawning behavior of Pacific lamprey (CTUIR) The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable levels. Since 2000, the project has been successful in increasing larval abundance in the upstream reaches of the Umatilla by outplanting sexually mature adults. However, spawning habitat requirements of the adults in the river remains largely unknown. After an over-wintering holding period (mid-September until mid-March), in which Pacific lampreys remain relatively sedentary, adult lampreys begin migrating upstream. The objective of this work is to monitor the movement of Pacific lamprey in the Umatilla River from the time upmigration begins after the over wintering period (March), until spawning (May-June). By tracking the movement of lamprey in the Umatilla, we aim to quantitatively assess the spawning habitat selection of adult lamprey. These efforts are crucial to understanding the life cycle of the lamprey, and for successful conservation efforts. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $130,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Mark/Tag Animals Mark and tag Pacific Lamprey for radio tracking experiment (CTUIR) In each study year, we will collect up to 100 adult Pacific lamprey in early June at a trap located at Bonneville Dam (Columbia River at river kilometer 235). On the day of capture, each lamprey will be equipped with a uniquely coded radio transmitter that is less than 0.6% of its body weight and less than 25% of its girth (to minimize tagging effects). All lamprey will be anaesthetized using 60 ppm clove oil, measured (length and girth to the nearest mm) and weighed (nearest gram). A transmitter will be inserted into the body cavity, and the antenna threaded through the body wall approximately 3 cm posterior to the incision using a cannula (following the methods of Moser et al. 2002). The incision is closed with a 19-mm needle and at least five individual stitches of 3-0 absorbable surgical suture. Fish will be allowed to recover for approximately 2 to 4 hours prior to release in the Umatilla River. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $306,558
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element

Submit/Acquire Data Download radio telemetry data (CTUIR) Radio tagged adult Pacific lamprey will be relocated via mobile tracking and with an array of fixed-site receiving stations positioned along the Umatilla River. Receiving stations will have a scanning receiving to accept data on lamprey position. To access this information data must be downloaded on a regular basis. Downloaded data will be transmitted to existing database at Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA. 1/1/2007 12/31/2009 $30,000
Biological Objectives Metrics
No Metrics for this Work Element


Section 8: Budget

Itemized Estimated Budget
Item Note FY 2007 Cost FY 2008 Cost FY 2009 Cost
Personnel NMFS/NOAA $25,264 $27,790 $30,569
Travel NMFS/NOAA $4,975 $4,975 $5,715
Other NMFS/NOAA Rents (9% of direct labor) $2,274 $2,501 $2,751
Supplies NMFS/NOAA $29,500 $1,500 $1,500
Overhead NMFS/NOAA $13,339 $14,673 $16,140
Fringe Benefits NMFS/NOAA $6,316 $6,948 $7,642
Personnel CTUIR $201,915 $202,924 $213,070
Fringe Benefits CTUIR (27%) $54,517 $54,789 $57,528
Travel CTUIR (air fare, vehicle expense, per diem for field work) $30,728 $31,728 $32,728
Supplies CTUIR $24,100 $24,100 $24,100
Overhead CTUIR Indirect (39%) $117,613 $118,502 $123,918
Other Professional Services (lab analysis, aerial flights) $17,500 $17,500 $17,500
Totals $528,041 $507,930 $533,161

Total Estimated FY 2007-2009 Budgets
Total Itemized Budget$1,569,132
Total Work Element budget$1,569,132

Cost sharing
Funding Source or Organization Item or Service Provided FY 2007 Est Value ($) FY 2008 Est Value ($) FY 2009 Est Value ($) Cash or in-kind? Status

Section 9: Project Future
Project Future Costs and/or Termination
FY 2010 Est Budget FY 2011 Est Budget Comments
$ 0 $ 0
Future Operations & Maintenance Costs
 
Termination Date Comments
 
Final Deliverables

Section 10: Narrative
Document Type Size Date

Part 2 of 2. Reviews of Proposal
Administrative Review Group (ARG) Results
Account Type:
Expense
No changes were made to this proposal


NPCC Final Funding Recommendations (October 23, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
Budget Type:Expense
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Recommendation:Do Not Fund
Comments:


NPCC Draft Funding Recommendations (September 15, 2006) [Full NPCC Council Recs]

FY 2007 Budget
$ 0
FY 2008 Budget
$ 0
FY 2009 Budget
$ 0
Total NPCC Rec
$ 0
FY 2007 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2008 MSRT Rec
$ 0
FY 2009 MSRT Rec
$ 0
Total MSRT Rec
$ 0
Budget Category:ProvinceExpense
Comments:

Local or MSRT Comments: CTUIR priority for only place for lamprey success monitoring for returning lamprey to stream and for basis of work occurring elsewhere in the Columbia.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Final Review (August 31, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Fundable in part (Qualified)
NPCC Comments: The ISRP has previously called attention to the need for oversight of work on lamprey in the Columbia Basin. There has been an effort in this direction (apparently through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority) by appointment of a Columbia Basin Lamprey Technical Working Group. However, it is clear that the Technical Working Group has served as a medium of information exchange, rather than as a coordinating body to assign tasks and avoid unnecessary duplication of effort, as was intended by the ISRP recommendation. The sponsors are reluctant to accept the concept of a "generic" applied study on lamprey on their watershed (or somewhere else in the Basin) that might provide results that are widely applicable. Watershed-specific issues, such as identification of specific obstacles to passage, are no doubt important but a concerted, well-coordinated, and cooperative effort would provide better scientific results with respect to identification of physical and biological characteristics of impediments to passage. The basic question is “Does the region need a lamprey project with similar goals, objectives and tasks in every subbasin?” If this criterion is applied to the Umatilla Basin, the question becomes “What is the innovative work that is being done that is expected to be applicable basinwide, or that requires tasks specific to the Umatilla?”

The ISRP had asked for a revision of the Project History section, organized by objectives. This was not supplied. We remain convinced that the sponsors themselves would benefit from a progress report that would relate the particular aspects of the life history and behavior of lamprey in the Umatilla River.

The sponsors agree with the ISRP that if mainstem passage is not improved, major increases in adult abundance in the Umatilla River may not occur. The question to be addressed by this proposal then is, to what degree factors within the Umatilla Basin might still limit abundance even if mainstem passage is improved. Direction for efforts of this project would be improved by identification of potential or possible limiting factors in the Umatilla Basin, and a focus on those that are determined to be likely to have the greatest effect on abundance. It is difficult to reconcile the sponsor's statement, made later in their response, that habitat is not a limiting factor for lamprey in the Umatilla River with comments such as: “The issue of dewatering is serious and the low head diversion dams that provide the water may also inhibit migration.”

The Abstract of this proposal provides a useful summary of objectives for work in the Umatilla River: “In addition to increasing the abundance of larval lamprey in the subbasin, key components are to establish that more adult lamprey are returning to the Umatilla Subbasin, and that they are able to reach historical spawning areas. Consequently, the project objectives are: (1) estimate the numbers of adult lampreys entering the Umatilla Subbasin; (2) investigate the olfactory cues lamprey use to orient in the Umatilla Subbasin; (3) monitor passage success to spawning areas; (4) develop structures to improve passage success; (5) increase larval abundance in the Umatilla River by continuing to outplant adult lamprey; (6) monitor larval population trends in the Umatilla River by conducting electrofishing surveys, and (7) estimate the numbers of juvenile lampreys migrating out of the Umatilla River.”

ISRP requested information on annual reports and meta-data. The sponsors did not respond adequately to this request. They refer to reports with results but do not summarize or give citations to many of the reports.

The ISRP concludes that benefits in terms of potential for improved abundance of Pacific lamprey in the Umatilla Basin are likely to accrue from portions of this project, modified according to the following recommendation.

Fundable in part, as listed below:

Objectives 1, 3, 4 (except Task 2d), 5, and 6. Emphasis of the work should be placed on:

1. Enumeration of upstream migration of adults in the Umatilla River. The proposed radio tracking approach deserves more emphasis. Sponsors should obtain advice from a statistician in the design and analysis of their enumeration efforts.

2. Identification of barriers to adult migration within the river. The sponsors should determine particular features of these barriers that inhibit or prevent passage and consider the possibility that if mainstem passage is the principle cause of low adult abundances, then improvements in the migration corridor in the Umatilla Basin may have little impact on adult returns.

3. Outmigrant abundance must be accurately determined. With the low numbers expected, increased effort will be required beyond what is described in the proposal, with a rigorous statistical design applied to the sampling of juveniles, with the assistance of a statistician.

4. Quantify effects of river operations, i.e., pumping of water from the Columbia River and its subsequent distribution, on abundance and success of passage of lamprey upstream and downstream. (Quantify with river flow and lamprey counts.) (Note the ISRP comments on other proposals for work in the Umatilla River, specifically 198343600, in which we recommend incorporation of all projects into a package we refer to as the Umatilla Initiative, which should be established to evaluate the effects on fish abundance of restoration of flows in the river, other habitat improvement measures, and the hatchery. Restoration of flow would seem to be an obvious habitat improvement measure that ought to affect abundance of lamprey.)

5. Carefully investigate the causes for low larval survival. Likely suspects include fluctuations or reductions in flow brought about by irrigation removals or other operations, leading to stranding and compaction of substrate in which lamprey are located. Investigate possibilities for modification of operations, if warranted.

Not Fundable:

We view objective 2 as being unlikely to reveal measures that might lead to increases in lamprey abundance. Our conclusion is that further studies of stress steroids, larval extracts, sex pheromones, bile salts, synthetic compounds or the like, are not, at this time, fruitful areas of pursuit and are not likely to suggest measures that might lead to increases in lamprey abundance. This work cannot be justified given current knowledge (or the lack of it) of up-river lamprey populations.


Independent Scientific Review Panel Preliminary Review (June 2, 2006) [Download full document]

Recommendation: Response requested
NPCC Comments: Technical and Scientific Background: Decline in abundance of Pacific lamprey is recognized as one of the key anadromous fish problems in the Columbia basin. The proposed work is directed at developing self-sustaining lamprey populations. The proposal addresses this problem by attempting to better understand factors impeding upstream migration of adults. The sponsors need to explain why they believe that conditions in the upstream migration corridor in the Umatilla are the major factors limiting adult lamprey abundance rather than passage at the mainstem dams. The proposal would be improved by more background material on possible passage problems for lamprey in the Umatilla watershed (e.g., number of dams, descriptions, etc). If mainstem passage is the principle cause of low adult abundances then improvements in the migration corridor in the Umatilla Basin may have little impact on adult returns.

The literature review is adequate but the cited references to the sea lamprey may not be relevant.

Alternative hypotheses concerning factors affecting survival should be mentioned, especially estuarine and marine factors.

Rationale and significance to subbasin plans and regional programs: The proposal directly addresses biological objectives and specific action items related to lamprey restoration in the Umatilla Subbasin Plan, the biological objectives in the Fish and Wildlife Program, and the 2000 Biological Opinion. The proposal also addresses uncertainties identified by the Lamprey technical work group.

Relationships to other project: The tie-in with other lamprey projects is mentioned, especially with 20070220 (stress/cDNA microarrays). However, we question whether there is a potential benefit to fish from that particular aspect of the project. The potential application in a restoration initiative is not clear. Two in-basin M&E projects collect data said to support the proposed project. The project is said to provide useful information on lamprey migration to a BPA funded project seeking to increase flows in the Umatilla.

The proposal seems somewhat in isolation from non-lamprey projects and might benefit from collaboration with people working on stream habitat.

We found no mention of the Lamprey Workshop sponsored by CRITFC in 2004. This is a serious omission from this proposal. To ensure there is maximum return from its investment in restoration of Pacific lamprey, the Council should insist that proponents of lamprey studies throughout the Basin spell out the nature of their cooperation with the others. This could be accomplished through the Columbia Basin Lamprey Technical Working Group mentioned in proposal 200201600.

This proposal makes no mention of lamprey work being conducted elsewhere, as for example in the Deschutes River (Proposal 200201600). There is a question whether full information exchanges have continued. Agreements should be designed to maximize information obtained from the studies by apportioning responsibilities among the funded lamprey projects.

Project history: Valuable information appears to have been gained since the project’s inception; however, some accomplishments are poorly presented. For example, it is not clear whether the sponsors believe that outplanting of lamprey has been effective or not. The description of past work is often sketchy and conclusions sometimes were not provided. The sponsors need to provide a bottom line, a comprehensive synthesis, a summary of what has been learned since project inception. Based upon past work, the knowledge gaps that need to be addressed should clearly and logically be identified. For example: What has been learned about stock genetics that is relevant to the project? What conclusions can be drawn from the pheromone studies about migratory cues and how is it relevant to lamprey restoration in the Umatilla? We are skeptical that these have potential for practical application in restoration initiatives.

Objectives: Objectives relating to population monitoring and stream surveys should have measurable benefits for long-term databases. Research on olfactory cues is more exploratory, and results are less tangible for the program unless some form of attractant can be developed. Most of the objectives are directed at issues related to lamprey recovery and are necessary for M&E. Objective 2, relating to pheromones is poorly justified and its relevance to lamprey recovery is unclear. The sponsors have been conducting pheromone research since 2000 but they have not presented any firm conclusions that make clear how the work might benefit lamprey restoration in the Columbia Basin. Here, the problems are exactly opposite those in the Great lakes, where the objective is to reduce lamprey populations. Pheromones have been useful there in attracting lamprey to their deaths. Ecological factors such as reduced flow, increased temperature, and mortality and passage problems at mainstem dams may be far more important in explaining the low adult return than an insufficient concentration of pheromone attractors. Stimulating migration up the Umatilla by introducing pheromones into the water, if it can be done successfully -- a large unknown -- may have little impact on adult returns to the river unless other major causes of adult declines are addressed first. Objective 2 should be eliminated.

Tasks (work elements) and methods: The methods used are adequate for investigation of freshwater factors that may be limiting lamprey in the basin. Radio-tagging and trapping designs are reasonable. Statistical aspects of estimating larval lamprey in the sediments may be questioned, see 200001400 (lamprey in Cedar Creek WA). Extrapolation of trap counts to number per square meter in the Umatilla River is a stretch given the mosaic of habitats in the river.

For others, such as the in-river behavioral studies, description of the design and methods is insufficient. In the radio-telemetry study it is unclear how the two hypotheses will be tested and how they can be distinguished from each other. The use of radio tracking addresses the objective of improving upstream passage for adult lamprey, and assumes that solutions have already been devised ("low elevation ramp"). Would it not be reasonable to assign high priority to fitting the obstacles identified in year 1 with these ramps and shifting the objective of the radio tracking study to evaluating the effectiveness of these ramps? Why wait?

Monitoring and evaluation: M&E is a part of the proposal. The adequacy of some of the methods such as those used to assess adult abundance is questionable. The confidence interval for the 2000 estimate of outmigrant abundance using screw traps is so large as to render the estimate virtually meaningless.

It will be difficult to link tributary monitoring to mainstem, estuarine, and marine sampling but this may be necessary to determine ultimate success/failure of the recovery program.

Facilities, Equipment, and Personnel: The facilities seem adequate, and the personnel are qualified.

Information Transfer: Plans for information transfer are adequate, and the proponents have a good track record for publications in the peer-reviewed literature. Annual reports and publications are mentioned, but there is no discussion of the disposition of meta-data.

Benefit to focal and non-focal species: The project could result in long-term benefits for lamprey if the deficiencies are dealt with adequately. It appears from results so far, that the greatest benefit is to be expected from improvements in passage. Habitat is not limiting, they say. Obstacles to passage have been identified in the mainstem and the Umatilla itself. The proposal should discuss the effect of lamprey sampling (trapping, electroshocking) on salmonids, non-salmonids and other biota.

Summary: Overall this is a comprehensive project generating good data on lamprey ecology in freshwater. However as with other anadromous species the estuarine and marine phases are probably as important. The proposal would benefit from more explanation of the success or failure of outplanting. Has this been attempted elsewhere? Have any results been published?

Other questions relate to statistical methods and degree of coordination, overlap, and consistency with other lamprey projects in the Columbia River Basin, as noted above.

The proposal should focus upon the central purpose of the proposed work, which is to increase adult returns. Major causes of low return rates of adults apparently are mortality and passage problems at mainstem dams, possible low flows and high temperatures, and low survival to the outmigrant stage, as indicated by large reductions in trapped outmigrants despite increasing larval abundance. The sponsors should focus their work on these problems. Pheromone research (Objective 2) should be discontinued as it is less relevant to the major problems at this point in time. A possibly critical issue seems to be survival from the larval to the outmigrant stage. The sponsors should carefully investigate the causes for low larval survival. Outmigrant abundance must be accurately determined. Every effort should be made to significantly increase flows in the lower river during the period of adult migration. Further discussion of this hindrance to passage seems necessary. It seems possible that monitoring upstream migrations and improving passage through barriers could improve upstream passage, but if low larval survival rates continue, any increase in abundance would still be limited by the low number of adults appearing at the river mouth.

The sponsors seem to be working under the assumption that lamprey do not home with fidelity (the small study in the lower Columbia cannot be considered to be conclusive) and that their genetic structure is not substantively different from other stocks (this topic needs a more thorough discussion). The sponsors do not present a convincing case in support of this assumption in the proposal, other than to record the fact that lamprey collected at John Day Dam did spawn successfully in the Umatilla. More thought should be given to this subject, particularly since other lamprey projects are being funded to conduct genetic analysis of lamprey. The focus in this proposal upon bile salts and pheromones seems questionable at best, and to be primarily of academic interest, particularly given the willingness to collect lamprey at a mainstem dam for introduction into the Umatilla. To date, obstacles to passage seem to explain the low abundance of lamprey in the Columbia Basin.

1. The past history should be revised. It is presented by year and not by objective. No supporting graphs or tables for the yearly data. Temporal trends are needed.

2. Examination of effects of dams on migrations of adults should focus upon questions such as: What are the physical characteristics of impediments to lamprey passage? Aspects of lamprey behavior and bioengineering need to be incorporated to identify what the actual passage problem(s) is or are.

3. Sponsors should refer to the ISRP programmatic comments on lamprey and respond to them.

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